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Current pain education within undergraduate medical studies across Europe: Advancing the Provision of Pain Education and Learning (APPEAL) study.

Briggs EV, Battelli D, Gordon D, Kopf A, Ribeiro S, Puig MM, Kress HG - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Excluding France, only 22% (47/211 schools) provided a dedicated pain module and in only 9% (18/211) was this compulsory.Overall, the median number of hours spent teaching pain was 12.0 (range 4-56.0 h; IQR: 12.0) for compulsory dedicated pain modules and 9.0 (range 1.0-60.0 h; IQR: 10.5) for other compulsory (non-pain specific) modules.There was substantial international variation throughout.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, King's College London, London, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Percentage of medical schools with a dedicated pain medicine module (compulsory or elective) documented on the undergraduate curriculum in 15 European countries*.
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BMJOPEN2014006984F1: Percentage of medical schools with a dedicated pain medicine module (compulsory or elective) documented on the undergraduate curriculum in 15 European countries*.

Mentions: Where dedicated pain modules were provided, they were compulsory in only 44 schools (18% of all schools; figure 1). For 37 schools (15%), pain teaching was documented only within such a dedicated pain module (ie, and not within other compulsory modules). Dedicated pain modules were most common in France (27/31 schools; 87%). Excluding France, only 47/211 schools (22%) provided a dedicated pain module and in only 18/211 (9%) was this compulsory. Five schools with available information enrolled a mean of 22 students (range 15–50) in elective dedicated pain modules, representing 4–11% of the schools’ students in that year group.


Current pain education within undergraduate medical studies across Europe: Advancing the Provision of Pain Education and Learning (APPEAL) study.

Briggs EV, Battelli D, Gordon D, Kopf A, Ribeiro S, Puig MM, Kress HG - BMJ Open (2015)

Percentage of medical schools with a dedicated pain medicine module (compulsory or elective) documented on the undergraduate curriculum in 15 European countries*.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4538268&req=5

BMJOPEN2014006984F1: Percentage of medical schools with a dedicated pain medicine module (compulsory or elective) documented on the undergraduate curriculum in 15 European countries*.
Mentions: Where dedicated pain modules were provided, they were compulsory in only 44 schools (18% of all schools; figure 1). For 37 schools (15%), pain teaching was documented only within such a dedicated pain module (ie, and not within other compulsory modules). Dedicated pain modules were most common in France (27/31 schools; 87%). Excluding France, only 47/211 schools (22%) provided a dedicated pain module and in only 18/211 (9%) was this compulsory. Five schools with available information enrolled a mean of 22 students (range 15–50) in elective dedicated pain modules, representing 4–11% of the schools’ students in that year group.

Bottom Line: Excluding France, only 22% (47/211 schools) provided a dedicated pain module and in only 9% (18/211) was this compulsory.Overall, the median number of hours spent teaching pain was 12.0 (range 4-56.0 h; IQR: 12.0) for compulsory dedicated pain modules and 9.0 (range 1.0-60.0 h; IQR: 10.5) for other compulsory (non-pain specific) modules.There was substantial international variation throughout.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, King's College London, London, UK.

No MeSH data available.