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Impact of a private sector living wage intervention on depressive symptoms among apparel workers in the Dominican Republic: a quasi-experimental study.

Burmaster KB, Landefeld JC, Rehkopf DH, Lahiff M, Sokal-Gutierrez K, Adler-Milstein S, Fernald LC - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Poverty reduction interventions through cash transfers and microcredit have had mixed effects on mental health.These individuals were compared with workers at a similar local factory paying minimum wage, 15-16 months postintervention.In adjusted analyses using the standard CES-D clinical cut-off of 16, workers at the intervention factory had a 47% reduced risk of clinically significant levels of depressive symptoms compared with workers at the comparison factory (23% vs 40%).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of California Berkeley, University of California San Francisco Joint Medical Program, Berkeley, California, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of total CES-D scores for comparison and intervention factory workers. Boxes denote the IQR between the first and third quartiles (25th and 75th centiles, respectively) and the blue line inside denotes the median. Whiskers denote the lowest and highest values within 1.5 times IQR from the first and third quartiles, respectively. Circles denote outliers beyond the whiskers. The red line denotes the total CES-D score of 16 that has frequently been used as the cut-off indicating clinical levels of distress. CES-D, Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale.
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BMJOPEN2014007336F1: Distribution of total CES-D scores for comparison and intervention factory workers. Boxes denote the IQR between the first and third quartiles (25th and 75th centiles, respectively) and the blue line inside denotes the median. Whiskers denote the lowest and highest values within 1.5 times IQR from the first and third quartiles, respectively. Circles denote outliers beyond the whiskers. The red line denotes the total CES-D score of 16 that has frequently been used as the cut-off indicating clinical levels of distress. CES-D, Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale.

Mentions: Workers at the intervention factory had lower mean depressive symptom scores than workers at the comparison factory (10.6±9.3 vs 14.7±11.6, p=0.007) (table 2); depressive symptom scores had a much wider distribution among workers at the comparison factory when compared with the intervention factory (figure 1). Using the standard CES-D cut-off score of 16, 23% of workers at the intervention factory reported clinical levels of depressive symptoms compared to 40% of workers at the comparison factory (p=0.010). Using a more conservative CES-D cut-off score of 20, 17% of workers at the intervention factory and 29% of workers at the comparison factory reported clinical levels of depressive symptoms (p=0.053).


Impact of a private sector living wage intervention on depressive symptoms among apparel workers in the Dominican Republic: a quasi-experimental study.

Burmaster KB, Landefeld JC, Rehkopf DH, Lahiff M, Sokal-Gutierrez K, Adler-Milstein S, Fernald LC - BMJ Open (2015)

Distribution of total CES-D scores for comparison and intervention factory workers. Boxes denote the IQR between the first and third quartiles (25th and 75th centiles, respectively) and the blue line inside denotes the median. Whiskers denote the lowest and highest values within 1.5 times IQR from the first and third quartiles, respectively. Circles denote outliers beyond the whiskers. The red line denotes the total CES-D score of 16 that has frequently been used as the cut-off indicating clinical levels of distress. CES-D, Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4538264&req=5

BMJOPEN2014007336F1: Distribution of total CES-D scores for comparison and intervention factory workers. Boxes denote the IQR between the first and third quartiles (25th and 75th centiles, respectively) and the blue line inside denotes the median. Whiskers denote the lowest and highest values within 1.5 times IQR from the first and third quartiles, respectively. Circles denote outliers beyond the whiskers. The red line denotes the total CES-D score of 16 that has frequently been used as the cut-off indicating clinical levels of distress. CES-D, Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale.
Mentions: Workers at the intervention factory had lower mean depressive symptom scores than workers at the comparison factory (10.6±9.3 vs 14.7±11.6, p=0.007) (table 2); depressive symptom scores had a much wider distribution among workers at the comparison factory when compared with the intervention factory (figure 1). Using the standard CES-D cut-off score of 16, 23% of workers at the intervention factory reported clinical levels of depressive symptoms compared to 40% of workers at the comparison factory (p=0.010). Using a more conservative CES-D cut-off score of 20, 17% of workers at the intervention factory and 29% of workers at the comparison factory reported clinical levels of depressive symptoms (p=0.053).

Bottom Line: Poverty reduction interventions through cash transfers and microcredit have had mixed effects on mental health.These individuals were compared with workers at a similar local factory paying minimum wage, 15-16 months postintervention.In adjusted analyses using the standard CES-D clinical cut-off of 16, workers at the intervention factory had a 47% reduced risk of clinically significant levels of depressive symptoms compared with workers at the comparison factory (23% vs 40%).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of California Berkeley, University of California San Francisco Joint Medical Program, Berkeley, California, USA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus