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Unintentional fall-related mortality in the elderly: comparing patterns in two countries with different demographic structure.

Majdan M, Mauritz W - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: In ages over 75 years rates were significantly higher in Austria, compared to Slovakia.We conclude that higher proportions of the elderly population of Austria could have contributed to the higher fall-related mortality rates compared to Slovakia, especially in females over 80 years.Our study quantified the differences between two countries with different structure of the elderly population and these findings could be used in planning future needs of health and social services and to plan prevention in countries where a rapid increase in age of the population can be foreseen.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Health Sciences and Social Work, Department of Public Health, Trnava University, Trnava, Slovakia International Neurotrauma Research organization (INRO), Vienna, Austria.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Crude and standardised fall-related mortality rates per 100 000 person-years in Slovakia and Austria in 2003–2010. SK, Slovakia; AT, Austria.
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BMJOPEN2015008672F1: Crude and standardised fall-related mortality rates per 100 000 person-years in Slovakia and Austria in 2003–2010. SK, Slovakia; AT, Austria.

Mentions: Table 1 presents the annual average mortality rates by age group and sex for both countries along with crude and age standardised overall mortality rates. Detailed calculations of annual mortality rates by age-groups and sex can be found in online supplementary tables S1 and S2 in the ESM. The annual average crude mortality rate for Slovakia was 28.82 and for Austria 54.19. When comparing mortality rates in the analysed age groups a clear increasing tendency was observed towards higher age in both countries and both sexes, with the highest rates in the age group of 95 years and older. The analysis of time trends (from 2003 to 2010) revealed an increasing trend of female and overall mortality rates in Slovakia (Kendall's τ 0.29 for both) and a stagnation of rates in males (τ=0.07). On the other hand, female, male and overall mortality rates in Austria were decreasing over the analysed period (τ=−0.57; −0.57 and −0.43). Such trends were observed also for the age standardised rates (see figure 1 for details).


Unintentional fall-related mortality in the elderly: comparing patterns in two countries with different demographic structure.

Majdan M, Mauritz W - BMJ Open (2015)

Crude and standardised fall-related mortality rates per 100 000 person-years in Slovakia and Austria in 2003–2010. SK, Slovakia; AT, Austria.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4538254&req=5

BMJOPEN2015008672F1: Crude and standardised fall-related mortality rates per 100 000 person-years in Slovakia and Austria in 2003–2010. SK, Slovakia; AT, Austria.
Mentions: Table 1 presents the annual average mortality rates by age group and sex for both countries along with crude and age standardised overall mortality rates. Detailed calculations of annual mortality rates by age-groups and sex can be found in online supplementary tables S1 and S2 in the ESM. The annual average crude mortality rate for Slovakia was 28.82 and for Austria 54.19. When comparing mortality rates in the analysed age groups a clear increasing tendency was observed towards higher age in both countries and both sexes, with the highest rates in the age group of 95 years and older. The analysis of time trends (from 2003 to 2010) revealed an increasing trend of female and overall mortality rates in Slovakia (Kendall's τ 0.29 for both) and a stagnation of rates in males (τ=0.07). On the other hand, female, male and overall mortality rates in Austria were decreasing over the analysed period (τ=−0.57; −0.57 and −0.43). Such trends were observed also for the age standardised rates (see figure 1 for details).

Bottom Line: In ages over 75 years rates were significantly higher in Austria, compared to Slovakia.We conclude that higher proportions of the elderly population of Austria could have contributed to the higher fall-related mortality rates compared to Slovakia, especially in females over 80 years.Our study quantified the differences between two countries with different structure of the elderly population and these findings could be used in planning future needs of health and social services and to plan prevention in countries where a rapid increase in age of the population can be foreseen.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Health Sciences and Social Work, Department of Public Health, Trnava University, Trnava, Slovakia International Neurotrauma Research organization (INRO), Vienna, Austria.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus