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The effects of valence and arousal on time perception in individuals with social anxiety.

Yoo JY, Lee JH - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Consequently, adaptive behavior is disrupted and interpersonal situations avoided.Participants were assigned to two groups, High Anxiety (HA) and Low Anxiety (LA), presented with four types of facial expression stimuli (positive-high arousal, positive-low arousal, negative-high arousal, and negative-low arousal), and asked to estimate the duration of stimulus presentation.Results indicated that, relative to other stimuli, the HA and LA groups perceived longer presentation for high-arousal negative and low-arousal positive stimuli, respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical Neuro-pSychology Lab, Department of Psychology, Chung-Ang University , Seoul, South Korea.

ABSTRACT
Time distortion in individuals with social anxiety has been defined as the seemingly slower passage of time in social situations and is related to both arousal and valence. Consequently, adaptive behavior is disrupted and interpersonal situations avoided. We explored the effects of valence and arousal on time distortion in individuals with social anxiety. Participants were assigned to two groups, High Anxiety (HA) and Low Anxiety (LA), presented with four types of facial expression stimuli (positive-high arousal, positive-low arousal, negative-high arousal, and negative-low arousal), and asked to estimate the duration of stimulus presentation. Results indicated that, relative to other stimuli, the HA and LA groups perceived longer presentation for high-arousal negative and low-arousal positive stimuli, respectively. These findings suggest that anxious individuals' time distortion was more severe in situations that evoked high arousal and involved negative emotion.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Time estimation value (modified T-Corrected) for each group.
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Figure 1: Time estimation value (modified T-Corrected) for each group.

Mentions: A 2 (Group: HA and LA) × 2 (Arousal: high and low) × 2 (Valence: positive and negative) mixed analysis of variance (ANOVA), with group as a between subject factor and arousal and valence as between-subject factors, was performed to identify differences in time perception between groups according to arousal and valence, using modified T-corrected scores (Figure 1). A significant effect of valence was observed, F(1, 38) = 26.37, p < 0.05, η2 = 0.41. Modified T-corrected scores were significantly higher for negative, relative to positive, pictures. A significant 2-way interaction between group and arousal was observed, F(1, 38) = 58.91, p < 0.05, η2 = 0.61, suggesting that patterns of modified T-corrected scores for arousal differed between the HA and LA groups. Post hoc tests showed higher rates of high, relative to low, arousal in the HA group, t(19) = –6.87, p < 0.001, and low, relative to high, arousal in the LA group, t(19) = 7.73, p < 0.001. A significant 3-way interaction between group, arousal, and valence was observed, F(1, 38) = 22.16, p < 0.05, η2 = 0.37, suggesting that patterns of time estimation differed according to arousal and valence between the HA and LA groups. Separate follow-up paired comparisons of arousal and valence were performed for each group to clarify the 3-way interaction. The HA group perceived the durations of the presentation of high-arousal negative pictures as significantly longer relative to those of high-arousal positive pictures, t(19) = –5.86, p < 0.05. In contrast, the LA group perceived the durations of the presentation of low-arousal positive pictures as significantly longer relative to those of low-arousal negative pictures, t(19) = –3.53, p < 0.05.


The effects of valence and arousal on time perception in individuals with social anxiety.

Yoo JY, Lee JH - Front Psychol (2015)

Time estimation value (modified T-Corrected) for each group.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4538238&req=5

Figure 1: Time estimation value (modified T-Corrected) for each group.
Mentions: A 2 (Group: HA and LA) × 2 (Arousal: high and low) × 2 (Valence: positive and negative) mixed analysis of variance (ANOVA), with group as a between subject factor and arousal and valence as between-subject factors, was performed to identify differences in time perception between groups according to arousal and valence, using modified T-corrected scores (Figure 1). A significant effect of valence was observed, F(1, 38) = 26.37, p < 0.05, η2 = 0.41. Modified T-corrected scores were significantly higher for negative, relative to positive, pictures. A significant 2-way interaction between group and arousal was observed, F(1, 38) = 58.91, p < 0.05, η2 = 0.61, suggesting that patterns of modified T-corrected scores for arousal differed between the HA and LA groups. Post hoc tests showed higher rates of high, relative to low, arousal in the HA group, t(19) = –6.87, p < 0.001, and low, relative to high, arousal in the LA group, t(19) = 7.73, p < 0.001. A significant 3-way interaction between group, arousal, and valence was observed, F(1, 38) = 22.16, p < 0.05, η2 = 0.37, suggesting that patterns of time estimation differed according to arousal and valence between the HA and LA groups. Separate follow-up paired comparisons of arousal and valence were performed for each group to clarify the 3-way interaction. The HA group perceived the durations of the presentation of high-arousal negative pictures as significantly longer relative to those of high-arousal positive pictures, t(19) = –5.86, p < 0.05. In contrast, the LA group perceived the durations of the presentation of low-arousal positive pictures as significantly longer relative to those of low-arousal negative pictures, t(19) = –3.53, p < 0.05.

Bottom Line: Consequently, adaptive behavior is disrupted and interpersonal situations avoided.Participants were assigned to two groups, High Anxiety (HA) and Low Anxiety (LA), presented with four types of facial expression stimuli (positive-high arousal, positive-low arousal, negative-high arousal, and negative-low arousal), and asked to estimate the duration of stimulus presentation.Results indicated that, relative to other stimuli, the HA and LA groups perceived longer presentation for high-arousal negative and low-arousal positive stimuli, respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Clinical Neuro-pSychology Lab, Department of Psychology, Chung-Ang University , Seoul, South Korea.

ABSTRACT
Time distortion in individuals with social anxiety has been defined as the seemingly slower passage of time in social situations and is related to both arousal and valence. Consequently, adaptive behavior is disrupted and interpersonal situations avoided. We explored the effects of valence and arousal on time distortion in individuals with social anxiety. Participants were assigned to two groups, High Anxiety (HA) and Low Anxiety (LA), presented with four types of facial expression stimuli (positive-high arousal, positive-low arousal, negative-high arousal, and negative-low arousal), and asked to estimate the duration of stimulus presentation. Results indicated that, relative to other stimuli, the HA and LA groups perceived longer presentation for high-arousal negative and low-arousal positive stimuli, respectively. These findings suggest that anxious individuals' time distortion was more severe in situations that evoked high arousal and involved negative emotion.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus