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Optical projection tomography permits efficient assessment of infarct volume in the murine heart postmyocardial infarction.

Zhao X, Wu J, Gray CD, McGregor K, Rossi AG, Morrison H, Jansen MA, Gray GA - Am. J. Physiol. Heart Circ. Physiol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Experimental studies therefore commonly assess injury by histological analysis of sections sampled from the infarcted heart, an approach that is labor intensive, can be subjective, and does not fully assess the extent of injury.Tissue processing for OPT did not compromise subsequent immunohistochemical detection of endothelial cell and inflammatory cell markers.OPT is thus a nondestructive, efficient, and accurate approach for routine in vitro assessment of murine myocardial infarct volume.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: BHF/University Centre for Cardiovascular Science, Queen's Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom;

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Optimization of image acquisition for identification and measurement of infarct regions in the mouse heart postmyocardial infarction (MI). In nontomographic projection images of an infarcted mouse heart, thinning of infarcted area is clearly visible (black arrowheads) when images were obtained using whether white (visible, A) or fluorescent light (B, 545 nm; C, 470 nm), compared with the darker viable myocardium. In tomographic reconstructions (D–F), the infarct region (dark, dashed contours) is optimally separated from the brighter viable myocardium, when applying the 470 nm excitation filter (F).
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Figure 3: Optimization of image acquisition for identification and measurement of infarct regions in the mouse heart postmyocardial infarction (MI). In nontomographic projection images of an infarcted mouse heart, thinning of infarcted area is clearly visible (black arrowheads) when images were obtained using whether white (visible, A) or fluorescent light (B, 545 nm; C, 470 nm), compared with the darker viable myocardium. In tomographic reconstructions (D–F), the infarct region (dark, dashed contours) is optimally separated from the brighter viable myocardium, when applying the 470 nm excitation filter (F).

Mentions: To determine the suitability of OPT for the identification of infarcted myocardium, 7 day postinfarct hearts were scanned for visible light transmittance and at two different fluorescent emission wavelengths (Fig. 3). While scanning in the visible (white) light channel, the contrast between viable and infarcted myocardium was sufficient to allow image reconstruction. However, emission from collagen or other fibrotic elements was too bright and widely distributed to permit threshold setting and analysis (Fig. 3, A and D). In both fluorescence emission channels, the viable myocardium was observed to have strong autofluorescence and was clearly delineated from infarct regions. Better resolution in the noninfarcted tissue and optimal discrimination between infarct and healthy myocardium were achieved following excitation at 470 nm (Fig. 3, C and F), and fluorescent emission imaging with excitation at 470 nm was thus adopted for all further investigations.


Optical projection tomography permits efficient assessment of infarct volume in the murine heart postmyocardial infarction.

Zhao X, Wu J, Gray CD, McGregor K, Rossi AG, Morrison H, Jansen MA, Gray GA - Am. J. Physiol. Heart Circ. Physiol. (2015)

Optimization of image acquisition for identification and measurement of infarct regions in the mouse heart postmyocardial infarction (MI). In nontomographic projection images of an infarcted mouse heart, thinning of infarcted area is clearly visible (black arrowheads) when images were obtained using whether white (visible, A) or fluorescent light (B, 545 nm; C, 470 nm), compared with the darker viable myocardium. In tomographic reconstructions (D–F), the infarct region (dark, dashed contours) is optimally separated from the brighter viable myocardium, when applying the 470 nm excitation filter (F).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4537945&req=5

Figure 3: Optimization of image acquisition for identification and measurement of infarct regions in the mouse heart postmyocardial infarction (MI). In nontomographic projection images of an infarcted mouse heart, thinning of infarcted area is clearly visible (black arrowheads) when images were obtained using whether white (visible, A) or fluorescent light (B, 545 nm; C, 470 nm), compared with the darker viable myocardium. In tomographic reconstructions (D–F), the infarct region (dark, dashed contours) is optimally separated from the brighter viable myocardium, when applying the 470 nm excitation filter (F).
Mentions: To determine the suitability of OPT for the identification of infarcted myocardium, 7 day postinfarct hearts were scanned for visible light transmittance and at two different fluorescent emission wavelengths (Fig. 3). While scanning in the visible (white) light channel, the contrast between viable and infarcted myocardium was sufficient to allow image reconstruction. However, emission from collagen or other fibrotic elements was too bright and widely distributed to permit threshold setting and analysis (Fig. 3, A and D). In both fluorescence emission channels, the viable myocardium was observed to have strong autofluorescence and was clearly delineated from infarct regions. Better resolution in the noninfarcted tissue and optimal discrimination between infarct and healthy myocardium were achieved following excitation at 470 nm (Fig. 3, C and F), and fluorescent emission imaging with excitation at 470 nm was thus adopted for all further investigations.

Bottom Line: Experimental studies therefore commonly assess injury by histological analysis of sections sampled from the infarcted heart, an approach that is labor intensive, can be subjective, and does not fully assess the extent of injury.Tissue processing for OPT did not compromise subsequent immunohistochemical detection of endothelial cell and inflammatory cell markers.OPT is thus a nondestructive, efficient, and accurate approach for routine in vitro assessment of murine myocardial infarct volume.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: BHF/University Centre for Cardiovascular Science, Queen's Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, United Kingdom;

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus