Limits...
Behavioral Change Challenges in the Context of Center-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation: A Qualitative Study.

Jokar F, Yousefi H, Yousefy A, Sadeghi M - Iran Red Crescent Med J (2015)

Bottom Line: Behaviors are actually adopted and sustained by patients are so far from that recommended by health professionals.This gap could be reduced by identifying behavioral change challenges, rooted in the beliefs of the individual and the family.Therefore, culturally-based interventions to enhance disease self-management should be considered.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Students Research Center, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, IR Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: Cardiovascular disease is chronic and often a sign of long-standing unhealthy lifestyle habits. Patients need support to reach lifestyle changes, well-being, join in social and vocational activity. Thus, patient responsibility should to be encouraged to provide quality as well as longevity. Cardiac rehabilitation programs aid patients in the attainment of these objectives. However, research shows that behavioral change following the diagnosis of a chronic disease is a challenge.

Objectives: We sought to determine behavioral change challenges in patients with cardiovascular disease to improve intervention programs.

Patients and methods: Using a descriptive qualitative approach, we collected the data using 30 in-depth semi-structure interviews. Thematic analysis was conducted to identify themes from the data.

Results: Three sources of behavioral change challenges emerged regarding the nature of cardiac disease and the role of the individual and the family in the recovery process. These challenges acted at two levels: intra- and interpersonal. The intrapersonal factors comprised value, knowledge and judgment about cardiovascular disease, and self-efficacy to fulfill the rehabilitation task. Family overprotection constituted the principal component of the interpersonal level.

Conclusions: Behaviors are actually adopted and sustained by patients are so far from that recommended by health professionals. This gap could be reduced by identifying behavioral change challenges, rooted in the beliefs of the individual and the family. Therefore, culturally-based interventions to enhance disease self-management should be considered.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Behavioral Change Challenge Level
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4537786&req=5

fig19796: Behavioral Change Challenge Level

Mentions: Behaviors are actually adopted and sustained by patients are so far from that recommended by health professionals. This gap could be bridged by identifying the challenges of behavioral change. The diagnosis of chronic diseases represents a potential “wake-up call”, a chance to make important lifestyle changes, so the patient moves back and forth between two opposite poles: the desire to change and the resistance to change in the context of cardiac rehabilitation. As is illustrated in Figure 2, the variables regarding behavioral change challenges among our study population acted at intra- and interpersonal levels. The factors at intrapersonal level were disease-oriented (heart disease, feeling of injustice; the heart, king of the body; living in the shadow of the disease; and stigma of heart disease), while those at interpersonal level concerned the patients' and their relatives' attitude toward the patients' capabilities after heart disease.


Behavioral Change Challenges in the Context of Center-Based Cardiac Rehabilitation: A Qualitative Study.

Jokar F, Yousefi H, Yousefy A, Sadeghi M - Iran Red Crescent Med J (2015)

Behavioral Change Challenge Level
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4537786&req=5

fig19796: Behavioral Change Challenge Level
Mentions: Behaviors are actually adopted and sustained by patients are so far from that recommended by health professionals. This gap could be bridged by identifying the challenges of behavioral change. The diagnosis of chronic diseases represents a potential “wake-up call”, a chance to make important lifestyle changes, so the patient moves back and forth between two opposite poles: the desire to change and the resistance to change in the context of cardiac rehabilitation. As is illustrated in Figure 2, the variables regarding behavioral change challenges among our study population acted at intra- and interpersonal levels. The factors at intrapersonal level were disease-oriented (heart disease, feeling of injustice; the heart, king of the body; living in the shadow of the disease; and stigma of heart disease), while those at interpersonal level concerned the patients' and their relatives' attitude toward the patients' capabilities after heart disease.

Bottom Line: Behaviors are actually adopted and sustained by patients are so far from that recommended by health professionals.This gap could be reduced by identifying behavioral change challenges, rooted in the beliefs of the individual and the family.Therefore, culturally-based interventions to enhance disease self-management should be considered.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Students Research Center, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, IR Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: Cardiovascular disease is chronic and often a sign of long-standing unhealthy lifestyle habits. Patients need support to reach lifestyle changes, well-being, join in social and vocational activity. Thus, patient responsibility should to be encouraged to provide quality as well as longevity. Cardiac rehabilitation programs aid patients in the attainment of these objectives. However, research shows that behavioral change following the diagnosis of a chronic disease is a challenge.

Objectives: We sought to determine behavioral change challenges in patients with cardiovascular disease to improve intervention programs.

Patients and methods: Using a descriptive qualitative approach, we collected the data using 30 in-depth semi-structure interviews. Thematic analysis was conducted to identify themes from the data.

Results: Three sources of behavioral change challenges emerged regarding the nature of cardiac disease and the role of the individual and the family in the recovery process. These challenges acted at two levels: intra- and interpersonal. The intrapersonal factors comprised value, knowledge and judgment about cardiovascular disease, and self-efficacy to fulfill the rehabilitation task. Family overprotection constituted the principal component of the interpersonal level.

Conclusions: Behaviors are actually adopted and sustained by patients are so far from that recommended by health professionals. This gap could be reduced by identifying behavioral change challenges, rooted in the beliefs of the individual and the family. Therefore, culturally-based interventions to enhance disease self-management should be considered.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus