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SDF-1/CXCR4 Axis Promotes MSCs to Repair Liver Injury Partially through Trans-Differentiation and Fusion with Hepatocytes.

Hao NB, Li CZ, Lü MH, Tang B, Wang SM, Wu YY, Liang GP, Yang SM - Stem Cells Int (2015)

Bottom Line: Then it was found that MSCs can transdifferentiate into hepatocyte-like cells and these hepatocyte-like cells can significantly express albumin.Furthermore it was also found that MSCs can fuse with the hepatocytes and these cells had the proliferation activity.However, the percentage of transdifferentiation was significantly higher than fusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037, China.

ABSTRACT
MSCs have become a popular target for developing end-stage liver therapies. In this study, two models of bone marrow chimeric mice were used to construct the liver failure models. Then it was found that MSCs can transdifferentiate into hepatocyte-like cells and these hepatocyte-like cells can significantly express albumin. Furthermore it was also found that MSCs can fuse with the hepatocytes and these cells had the proliferation activity. However, the percentage of transdifferentiation was significantly higher than fusion. So it was considered that MSCs which transdifferentiated into hepatocyte-likes cells played important roles for repairing the injuring liver function.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

MSCs recruited to injured tissue and transdifferentiated into hepatocyte-like cells. (a) The liver specimens were collected on days 2, 3, 4, 7, 14, 21, and 28 after injury. FISH was used to detect Y-chromosome-positive cells, and IF was used to detect ALB-positive cells. The nuclei were stained blue (DAPI). The images were then merged. Bar: 75 μm. Arrow was directed to the double positive cells. All the experiments were repeated three times, at least 3 samples were included in each group. (b) Quantitative data of the ALB and Y-chromosome-positive cells in IHC of different days after injuring (**P < 0.01; ***P < 0.001).
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fig1: MSCs recruited to injured tissue and transdifferentiated into hepatocyte-like cells. (a) The liver specimens were collected on days 2, 3, 4, 7, 14, 21, and 28 after injury. FISH was used to detect Y-chromosome-positive cells, and IF was used to detect ALB-positive cells. The nuclei were stained blue (DAPI). The images were then merged. Bar: 75 μm. Arrow was directed to the double positive cells. All the experiments were repeated three times, at least 3 samples were included in each group. (b) Quantitative data of the ALB and Y-chromosome-positive cells in IHC of different days after injuring (**P < 0.01; ***P < 0.001).

Mentions: To determine if MSCs can transdifferentiate into hepatocyte-like cells, on days 2, 3, 4, 7, 14, 21, and 28 after CCl4 injection into chimeric mice, liver specimens were harvested. Because Y-chromosome-positive cells were from the male mice, which represent the MSCs, and ALB is a specific marker for hepatocytes, we used FISH to detect the Y-chromosome-positive cells and IF to detect the ALB-positive cells. As shown in Figure 1(a), expression of the Y chromosome and ALB were detected in the same cells of the damaged liver using laser confocal microscopy. The population of Y-chromosome-positive cells ranged from 13.96% to 18.13%, while the population of both Y-chromosome- and ALB-positive cells ranged from 3.37% to 5.85% (Figure 1(b)). These results show that MSCs can differentiate to hepatocytes.


SDF-1/CXCR4 Axis Promotes MSCs to Repair Liver Injury Partially through Trans-Differentiation and Fusion with Hepatocytes.

Hao NB, Li CZ, Lü MH, Tang B, Wang SM, Wu YY, Liang GP, Yang SM - Stem Cells Int (2015)

MSCs recruited to injured tissue and transdifferentiated into hepatocyte-like cells. (a) The liver specimens were collected on days 2, 3, 4, 7, 14, 21, and 28 after injury. FISH was used to detect Y-chromosome-positive cells, and IF was used to detect ALB-positive cells. The nuclei were stained blue (DAPI). The images were then merged. Bar: 75 μm. Arrow was directed to the double positive cells. All the experiments were repeated three times, at least 3 samples were included in each group. (b) Quantitative data of the ALB and Y-chromosome-positive cells in IHC of different days after injuring (**P < 0.01; ***P < 0.001).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4537768&req=5

fig1: MSCs recruited to injured tissue and transdifferentiated into hepatocyte-like cells. (a) The liver specimens were collected on days 2, 3, 4, 7, 14, 21, and 28 after injury. FISH was used to detect Y-chromosome-positive cells, and IF was used to detect ALB-positive cells. The nuclei were stained blue (DAPI). The images were then merged. Bar: 75 μm. Arrow was directed to the double positive cells. All the experiments were repeated three times, at least 3 samples were included in each group. (b) Quantitative data of the ALB and Y-chromosome-positive cells in IHC of different days after injuring (**P < 0.01; ***P < 0.001).
Mentions: To determine if MSCs can transdifferentiate into hepatocyte-like cells, on days 2, 3, 4, 7, 14, 21, and 28 after CCl4 injection into chimeric mice, liver specimens were harvested. Because Y-chromosome-positive cells were from the male mice, which represent the MSCs, and ALB is a specific marker for hepatocytes, we used FISH to detect the Y-chromosome-positive cells and IF to detect the ALB-positive cells. As shown in Figure 1(a), expression of the Y chromosome and ALB were detected in the same cells of the damaged liver using laser confocal microscopy. The population of Y-chromosome-positive cells ranged from 13.96% to 18.13%, while the population of both Y-chromosome- and ALB-positive cells ranged from 3.37% to 5.85% (Figure 1(b)). These results show that MSCs can differentiate to hepatocytes.

Bottom Line: Then it was found that MSCs can transdifferentiate into hepatocyte-like cells and these hepatocyte-like cells can significantly express albumin.Furthermore it was also found that MSCs can fuse with the hepatocytes and these cells had the proliferation activity.However, the percentage of transdifferentiation was significantly higher than fusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology, Xinqiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037, China.

ABSTRACT
MSCs have become a popular target for developing end-stage liver therapies. In this study, two models of bone marrow chimeric mice were used to construct the liver failure models. Then it was found that MSCs can transdifferentiate into hepatocyte-like cells and these hepatocyte-like cells can significantly express albumin. Furthermore it was also found that MSCs can fuse with the hepatocytes and these cells had the proliferation activity. However, the percentage of transdifferentiation was significantly higher than fusion. So it was considered that MSCs which transdifferentiated into hepatocyte-likes cells played important roles for repairing the injuring liver function.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus