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Green Tea Increases the Concentration of Total Mercury in the Blood of Rats following an Oral Fish Tissue Bolus.

Janle EM, Freiser H, Manganais C, Chen TY, Craig BA, Santerre CR - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: Fish has many health benefits but is also the most common source of methylmercury.Green tea significantly increased the concentration of total mercury in blood relative to the control, whereas DMSA significantly decreased it.In addition, feeding caused a slight increase in blood mercury for several meals following the initial dose.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nutrition Science, Purdue University, 700 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2059, USA.

ABSTRACT
Fish has many health benefits but is also the most common source of methylmercury. The bioavailability of methylmercury in fish may be affected by other meal components. In this study, the effect of green tea on the bioavailability of methylmercury from an oral bolus of fish muscle tissue was studied in rats and compared to a water treated control group and a group treated with meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), a compound used medically to chelate mercury. Rats were given a single oral dose of fish tissue via gavage and one of the treatments. Rats were given access to food for 3 h at 12 h intervals. They were dosed with each of the treatments with each meal. Blood samples were collected for 95 hours. Green tea significantly increased the concentration of total mercury in blood relative to the control, whereas DMSA significantly decreased it. In addition, feeding caused a slight increase in blood mercury for several meals following the initial dose.

No MeSH data available.


Area under the curve for mercury concentration versus time for time = 0 to 95 h. The area under the curve was significantly different for each group (P < 0.05).
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fig2: Area under the curve for mercury concentration versus time for time = 0 to 95 h. The area under the curve was significantly different for each group (P < 0.05).

Mentions: The total blood mercury levels of over 96 hours after dose are illustrated in Figure 1. The baseline blood mercury concentrations for the three groups were the following: control (1.8 ± 0.6 μg/kg), green tea (1.3 ± 0.2 μg/kg), and DMSA (2.3 ± 0.5 μg/kg). The area under the curve for the three groups from 0 to 95 h is shown in Figure 2. The AUC was significantly different for all groups. The AUC for DMSA treatment (857 ± 56 μg h/kg) was significantly lower than the AUC of the control group (2000 ± 83 μg h/kg). Green tea increased the AUC significantly (2460 ± 145 μg h/kg) compared to the control group. The pharmacokinetic parameters are shown in Table 1. The maximum concentration (Cmax⁡) of the tea treated group (37.49 ± 2.48 μg/kg) is not significantly different from the control group (31.21 ± 1.50 μg/kg). The Cmax⁡ for the DMSA treated group (18.64 ± 2.00 μg/kg) is significantly lower than the Cmax⁡ of the control group and green tea treated group. The time of maximum concentration (Tmax⁡) was not significantly different between the tea treated group (22.33 ± 1.96 h) and the control group (20.33 ± 1.20 h). The Tmax⁡ for the DMSA treated group (12.00 ± 0.00 h) was significantly shorter than the green tea or control group. The Celim was not significantly different for the control (0.0076 ± 0.0007) and green tea (0.0080 ± 0.0008) groups. The Celim for the DMSA group (0.0241 ± 0.0046) was significantly higher than both the control and green tea groups. The blood mercury concentrations were not different for the three treatments for the first 8 hours. At 10 hours, the mercury concentration of the DMSA group was significantly lower (P < 0.05) than the control or green tea groups and remained significantly lower for the rest of the study. At 14 hours there was a trend toward a higher blood mercury in the green tea group than in the control group (P = 0.08), and by 18 hours the blood mercury in the green tea group was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than the control group. For all except 5 time points (70, 76, 78, 89, and 90 hours) the mercury of the green tea group remained significantly higher. For 3 of the time points that did not reach significant differences, 0.05 < P < 0.1.


Green Tea Increases the Concentration of Total Mercury in the Blood of Rats following an Oral Fish Tissue Bolus.

Janle EM, Freiser H, Manganais C, Chen TY, Craig BA, Santerre CR - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Area under the curve for mercury concentration versus time for time = 0 to 95 h. The area under the curve was significantly different for each group (P < 0.05).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4537724&req=5

fig2: Area under the curve for mercury concentration versus time for time = 0 to 95 h. The area under the curve was significantly different for each group (P < 0.05).
Mentions: The total blood mercury levels of over 96 hours after dose are illustrated in Figure 1. The baseline blood mercury concentrations for the three groups were the following: control (1.8 ± 0.6 μg/kg), green tea (1.3 ± 0.2 μg/kg), and DMSA (2.3 ± 0.5 μg/kg). The area under the curve for the three groups from 0 to 95 h is shown in Figure 2. The AUC was significantly different for all groups. The AUC for DMSA treatment (857 ± 56 μg h/kg) was significantly lower than the AUC of the control group (2000 ± 83 μg h/kg). Green tea increased the AUC significantly (2460 ± 145 μg h/kg) compared to the control group. The pharmacokinetic parameters are shown in Table 1. The maximum concentration (Cmax⁡) of the tea treated group (37.49 ± 2.48 μg/kg) is not significantly different from the control group (31.21 ± 1.50 μg/kg). The Cmax⁡ for the DMSA treated group (18.64 ± 2.00 μg/kg) is significantly lower than the Cmax⁡ of the control group and green tea treated group. The time of maximum concentration (Tmax⁡) was not significantly different between the tea treated group (22.33 ± 1.96 h) and the control group (20.33 ± 1.20 h). The Tmax⁡ for the DMSA treated group (12.00 ± 0.00 h) was significantly shorter than the green tea or control group. The Celim was not significantly different for the control (0.0076 ± 0.0007) and green tea (0.0080 ± 0.0008) groups. The Celim for the DMSA group (0.0241 ± 0.0046) was significantly higher than both the control and green tea groups. The blood mercury concentrations were not different for the three treatments for the first 8 hours. At 10 hours, the mercury concentration of the DMSA group was significantly lower (P < 0.05) than the control or green tea groups and remained significantly lower for the rest of the study. At 14 hours there was a trend toward a higher blood mercury in the green tea group than in the control group (P = 0.08), and by 18 hours the blood mercury in the green tea group was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than the control group. For all except 5 time points (70, 76, 78, 89, and 90 hours) the mercury of the green tea group remained significantly higher. For 3 of the time points that did not reach significant differences, 0.05 < P < 0.1.

Bottom Line: Fish has many health benefits but is also the most common source of methylmercury.Green tea significantly increased the concentration of total mercury in blood relative to the control, whereas DMSA significantly decreased it.In addition, feeding caused a slight increase in blood mercury for several meals following the initial dose.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nutrition Science, Purdue University, 700 West State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2059, USA.

ABSTRACT
Fish has many health benefits but is also the most common source of methylmercury. The bioavailability of methylmercury in fish may be affected by other meal components. In this study, the effect of green tea on the bioavailability of methylmercury from an oral bolus of fish muscle tissue was studied in rats and compared to a water treated control group and a group treated with meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), a compound used medically to chelate mercury. Rats were given a single oral dose of fish tissue via gavage and one of the treatments. Rats were given access to food for 3 h at 12 h intervals. They were dosed with each of the treatments with each meal. Blood samples were collected for 95 hours. Green tea significantly increased the concentration of total mercury in blood relative to the control, whereas DMSA significantly decreased it. In addition, feeding caused a slight increase in blood mercury for several meals following the initial dose.

No MeSH data available.