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Maternal Obesity and Rectovaginal Group B Streptococcus Colonization at Term.

Kleweis SM, Cahill AG, Odibo AO, Tuuli MG - Infect Dis Obstet Gynecol (2015)

Bottom Line: Baseline characteristics were compared using Student's t-test and Chi-squared or Fisher's exact test.Obese gravidas were significantly more likely to be colonized by GBS when compared with nonobese gravidas (28.4% versus 22.2%, P<0.001).Further research is needed to evaluate the impact of this finding on risk-based management strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine, Campus Box 8064, 4566 Scott Avenue, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To test the hypothesis that maternal obesity is an independent risk factor for rectovaginal group B streptococcus (GBS) colonization at term.

Study design: Retrospective cohort study of consecutive women with singleton term pregnancies admitted in labor at Barnes-Jewish Hospital (2004-2008). Maternal BMI≥30 Kg/m2 (obese) or <30 Kg/m2 (nonobese) defined the two comparison groups. The outcome of interest was GBS colonization from a positive culture. Baseline characteristics were compared using Student's t-test and Chi-squared or Fisher's exact test. The association between obesity and GBS colonization was assessed using univariable and multivariable analyses.

Results: Of the 10,564 women eligible, 7,711 met inclusion criteria. The prevalence of GBS colonization in the entire cohort was relatively high (25.8%). Obese gravidas were significantly more likely to be colonized by GBS when compared with nonobese gravidas (28.4% versus 22.2%, P<0.001). Obese gravidas were still 35% more likely than nonobese women to test positive for GBS after adjusting for race, parity, smoking, and diabetes (adjusted OR 1.35 [95% CI 1.21-1.50]).

Conclusion: Maternal obesity is a significant risk factor for GBS colonization at term. Further research is needed to evaluate the impact of this finding on risk-based management strategies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Risk of GBS colonization with increasing obesity categories.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig2: Risk of GBS colonization with increasing obesity categories.

Mentions: To determine if there is a dose-response relationship between increasing BMI category and GBS colonization, we calculated the risk of GBS colonization for BMI < 30 Kg/m2, 30–39.9, and ≥40 Kg/m2. GBS colonization increased in a dose-response fashion with increasing BMI: 22.2%, 27.3%, and 31.7%, respectively (Figure 2). The trend persisted in multivariable analysis adjusting for confounders (Table 2).


Maternal Obesity and Rectovaginal Group B Streptococcus Colonization at Term.

Kleweis SM, Cahill AG, Odibo AO, Tuuli MG - Infect Dis Obstet Gynecol (2015)

Risk of GBS colonization with increasing obesity categories.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4537723&req=5

fig2: Risk of GBS colonization with increasing obesity categories.
Mentions: To determine if there is a dose-response relationship between increasing BMI category and GBS colonization, we calculated the risk of GBS colonization for BMI < 30 Kg/m2, 30–39.9, and ≥40 Kg/m2. GBS colonization increased in a dose-response fashion with increasing BMI: 22.2%, 27.3%, and 31.7%, respectively (Figure 2). The trend persisted in multivariable analysis adjusting for confounders (Table 2).

Bottom Line: Baseline characteristics were compared using Student's t-test and Chi-squared or Fisher's exact test.Obese gravidas were significantly more likely to be colonized by GBS when compared with nonobese gravidas (28.4% versus 22.2%, P<0.001).Further research is needed to evaluate the impact of this finding on risk-based management strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine, Campus Box 8064, 4566 Scott Avenue, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To test the hypothesis that maternal obesity is an independent risk factor for rectovaginal group B streptococcus (GBS) colonization at term.

Study design: Retrospective cohort study of consecutive women with singleton term pregnancies admitted in labor at Barnes-Jewish Hospital (2004-2008). Maternal BMI≥30 Kg/m2 (obese) or <30 Kg/m2 (nonobese) defined the two comparison groups. The outcome of interest was GBS colonization from a positive culture. Baseline characteristics were compared using Student's t-test and Chi-squared or Fisher's exact test. The association between obesity and GBS colonization was assessed using univariable and multivariable analyses.

Results: Of the 10,564 women eligible, 7,711 met inclusion criteria. The prevalence of GBS colonization in the entire cohort was relatively high (25.8%). Obese gravidas were significantly more likely to be colonized by GBS when compared with nonobese gravidas (28.4% versus 22.2%, P<0.001). Obese gravidas were still 35% more likely than nonobese women to test positive for GBS after adjusting for race, parity, smoking, and diabetes (adjusted OR 1.35 [95% CI 1.21-1.50]).

Conclusion: Maternal obesity is a significant risk factor for GBS colonization at term. Further research is needed to evaluate the impact of this finding on risk-based management strategies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus