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Maternal Obesity and Rectovaginal Group B Streptococcus Colonization at Term.

Kleweis SM, Cahill AG, Odibo AO, Tuuli MG - Infect Dis Obstet Gynecol (2015)

Bottom Line: Baseline characteristics were compared using Student's t-test and Chi-squared or Fisher's exact test.Obese gravidas were significantly more likely to be colonized by GBS when compared with nonobese gravidas (28.4% versus 22.2%, P<0.001).Further research is needed to evaluate the impact of this finding on risk-based management strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine, Campus Box 8064, 4566 Scott Avenue, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To test the hypothesis that maternal obesity is an independent risk factor for rectovaginal group B streptococcus (GBS) colonization at term.

Study design: Retrospective cohort study of consecutive women with singleton term pregnancies admitted in labor at Barnes-Jewish Hospital (2004-2008). Maternal BMI≥30 Kg/m2 (obese) or <30 Kg/m2 (nonobese) defined the two comparison groups. The outcome of interest was GBS colonization from a positive culture. Baseline characteristics were compared using Student's t-test and Chi-squared or Fisher's exact test. The association between obesity and GBS colonization was assessed using univariable and multivariable analyses.

Results: Of the 10,564 women eligible, 7,711 met inclusion criteria. The prevalence of GBS colonization in the entire cohort was relatively high (25.8%). Obese gravidas were significantly more likely to be colonized by GBS when compared with nonobese gravidas (28.4% versus 22.2%, P<0.001). Obese gravidas were still 35% more likely than nonobese women to test positive for GBS after adjusting for race, parity, smoking, and diabetes (adjusted OR 1.35 [95% CI 1.21-1.50]).

Conclusion: Maternal obesity is a significant risk factor for GBS colonization at term. Further research is needed to evaluate the impact of this finding on risk-based management strategies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flowchart of study subjects.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Flowchart of study subjects.

Mentions: Of the 10,564 women admitted in labor at term during the study period, 7,711 met inclusion criteria (Figure 1). More than half of the cohort was obese (n = 4, 492, 58.3%). Majority of the women were African American (n = 5, 515, 71.5%) with a mean gestation age of 38.9 weeks. Obese and nonobese women were different in several baseline characteristics. Obese women were more likely to be older, Africa American, and having diabetes (Table 1).


Maternal Obesity and Rectovaginal Group B Streptococcus Colonization at Term.

Kleweis SM, Cahill AG, Odibo AO, Tuuli MG - Infect Dis Obstet Gynecol (2015)

Flowchart of study subjects.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4537723&req=5

fig1: Flowchart of study subjects.
Mentions: Of the 10,564 women admitted in labor at term during the study period, 7,711 met inclusion criteria (Figure 1). More than half of the cohort was obese (n = 4, 492, 58.3%). Majority of the women were African American (n = 5, 515, 71.5%) with a mean gestation age of 38.9 weeks. Obese and nonobese women were different in several baseline characteristics. Obese women were more likely to be older, Africa American, and having diabetes (Table 1).

Bottom Line: Baseline characteristics were compared using Student's t-test and Chi-squared or Fisher's exact test.Obese gravidas were significantly more likely to be colonized by GBS when compared with nonobese gravidas (28.4% versus 22.2%, P<0.001).Further research is needed to evaluate the impact of this finding on risk-based management strategies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine, Campus Box 8064, 4566 Scott Avenue, Saint Louis, MO 63110, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To test the hypothesis that maternal obesity is an independent risk factor for rectovaginal group B streptococcus (GBS) colonization at term.

Study design: Retrospective cohort study of consecutive women with singleton term pregnancies admitted in labor at Barnes-Jewish Hospital (2004-2008). Maternal BMI≥30 Kg/m2 (obese) or <30 Kg/m2 (nonobese) defined the two comparison groups. The outcome of interest was GBS colonization from a positive culture. Baseline characteristics were compared using Student's t-test and Chi-squared or Fisher's exact test. The association between obesity and GBS colonization was assessed using univariable and multivariable analyses.

Results: Of the 10,564 women eligible, 7,711 met inclusion criteria. The prevalence of GBS colonization in the entire cohort was relatively high (25.8%). Obese gravidas were significantly more likely to be colonized by GBS when compared with nonobese gravidas (28.4% versus 22.2%, P<0.001). Obese gravidas were still 35% more likely than nonobese women to test positive for GBS after adjusting for race, parity, smoking, and diabetes (adjusted OR 1.35 [95% CI 1.21-1.50]).

Conclusion: Maternal obesity is a significant risk factor for GBS colonization at term. Further research is needed to evaluate the impact of this finding on risk-based management strategies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus