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Microbiological Analysis of Necrosols Collected from Urban Cemeteries in Poland.

Całkosiński I, Płoneczka-Janeczko K, Ostapska M, Dudek K, Gamian A, Rypuła K - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: The fungi Penicillium spp. and Aspergillus spp. were isolated from 51% and 6.4% of samples, respectively.Other bacterial species were in the ground cemetery relatively sparse.Sampling depth was not correlated with bacterial growth (p > 0.05), but it was correlated with several differences in microbiota composition (superficial versus deep layer).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Neurotoxicology and Environmental Diagnosis, Faculty of Health Science, Wroclaw Medical University, 51-618 Wroclaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT
Decomposition of organic matter is the primary function in the soil ecosystem, which involves bacteria and fungi. Soil microbial content depends on many factors, and secondary biological and chemical contaminations change and affect environmental feedback. Little work has been done to estimate the microbiological risk for cemetery employees and visitors. The potential risk of infection for people in the cemetery is primarily associated with injury and wound contamination during performing the work. The aim of this study was to analyze the microbiota of cemetery soil obtained from cemeteries and bacterial composition in selected soil layers encountered by gravediggers and cemetery caretakers. The most common bacterial pathogens were Enterococcus spp. (80.6%), Bacillus spp. (77.4%), and E. coli (45.1%). The fungi Penicillium spp. and Aspergillus spp. were isolated from 51% and 6.4% of samples, respectively. Other bacterial species were in the ground cemetery relatively sparse. Sampling depth was not correlated with bacterial growth (p > 0.05), but it was correlated with several differences in microbiota composition (superficial versus deep layer).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Microbial growth on five cemeteries including the depth and space sampling.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig4: Microbial growth on five cemeteries including the depth and space sampling.

Mentions: Staphylococcus spp. was identified at only two sites (cemeteries A and D); the growth of bacteria from cemetery A with <103 CFU/mL was observed in samples taken from both soil depths, whereas in cemetery D the superficial layer generated less growth (<103 CFU/mL) than the deep layer (103–104 CFU/mL). Three genera were predominant at all cemeteries: Bacillus spp., Enterococcus spp., and Escherichia spp. Penicillium spp. was identified in samples from four of the five (80%) cemeteries. Sampling depth was not correlated with bacterial growth (p > 0.05; Figure 4), but it was correlated with several differences in microbiota composition (superficial versus deep layer: Bacillus spp. versus Enterococcus spp. (p = 0.021), Bacillus spp. versus KES group (p = 0.036), Bacillus spp. versus Staphylococcus spp. (p = 0.002), and Enterococcus spp. versus KES group (p = 0.019)).


Microbiological Analysis of Necrosols Collected from Urban Cemeteries in Poland.

Całkosiński I, Płoneczka-Janeczko K, Ostapska M, Dudek K, Gamian A, Rypuła K - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Microbial growth on five cemeteries including the depth and space sampling.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4537714&req=5

fig4: Microbial growth on five cemeteries including the depth and space sampling.
Mentions: Staphylococcus spp. was identified at only two sites (cemeteries A and D); the growth of bacteria from cemetery A with <103 CFU/mL was observed in samples taken from both soil depths, whereas in cemetery D the superficial layer generated less growth (<103 CFU/mL) than the deep layer (103–104 CFU/mL). Three genera were predominant at all cemeteries: Bacillus spp., Enterococcus spp., and Escherichia spp. Penicillium spp. was identified in samples from four of the five (80%) cemeteries. Sampling depth was not correlated with bacterial growth (p > 0.05; Figure 4), but it was correlated with several differences in microbiota composition (superficial versus deep layer: Bacillus spp. versus Enterococcus spp. (p = 0.021), Bacillus spp. versus KES group (p = 0.036), Bacillus spp. versus Staphylococcus spp. (p = 0.002), and Enterococcus spp. versus KES group (p = 0.019)).

Bottom Line: The fungi Penicillium spp. and Aspergillus spp. were isolated from 51% and 6.4% of samples, respectively.Other bacterial species were in the ground cemetery relatively sparse.Sampling depth was not correlated with bacterial growth (p > 0.05), but it was correlated with several differences in microbiota composition (superficial versus deep layer).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Neurotoxicology and Environmental Diagnosis, Faculty of Health Science, Wroclaw Medical University, 51-618 Wroclaw, Poland.

ABSTRACT
Decomposition of organic matter is the primary function in the soil ecosystem, which involves bacteria and fungi. Soil microbial content depends on many factors, and secondary biological and chemical contaminations change and affect environmental feedback. Little work has been done to estimate the microbiological risk for cemetery employees and visitors. The potential risk of infection for people in the cemetery is primarily associated with injury and wound contamination during performing the work. The aim of this study was to analyze the microbiota of cemetery soil obtained from cemeteries and bacterial composition in selected soil layers encountered by gravediggers and cemetery caretakers. The most common bacterial pathogens were Enterococcus spp. (80.6%), Bacillus spp. (77.4%), and E. coli (45.1%). The fungi Penicillium spp. and Aspergillus spp. were isolated from 51% and 6.4% of samples, respectively. Other bacterial species were in the ground cemetery relatively sparse. Sampling depth was not correlated with bacterial growth (p > 0.05), but it was correlated with several differences in microbiota composition (superficial versus deep layer).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus