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Evaluation of Ricinus communis L. for the Phytoremediation of Polluted Soil with Organochlorine Pesticides.

Rissato SR, Galhiane MS, Fernandes JR, Gerenutti M, Gomes HM, Ribeiro R, de Almeida MV - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: The contaminants tested were hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), DDT, heptachlor, aldrin, and others.Measurements made in rhizosphere soil indicate that the roots of the studied species reduce the concentration of pesticides.Results obtained during this study indicated that the higher the hydrophobicity of the organic compound and its molecular interaction with soil or root matrix the greater its tendency to concentrate in root tissues and the research showed the following trend: HCHs < diclofop-methyl < chlorpyrifos < methoxychlor < heptachlor epoxide < endrin < o,p'-DDE < heptachlor < dieldrin < aldrin < o,p'-DDT < p,p'-DDT by increasing order of log K ow values.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, Paulista State University (UNESP), CP 473, 17033-360 Bauru, SP, Brazil ; Department of Physics, Federal University of São Carlos (UFSCar), 13565-905 São Carlos, SP, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Phytoremediation is an attractive alternative to conventional treatments of soil due to advantages such as low cost, large application areas, and the possibility of in situ treatment. This study presents the assessment of phytoremediation processes conducted under controlled experimental conditions to evaluate the ability of Ricinus communis L., tropical plant species, to promote the degradation of 15 persistent organic pollutants (POPs), in a 66-day period. The contaminants tested were hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), DDT, heptachlor, aldrin, and others. Measurements made in rhizosphere soil indicate that the roots of the studied species reduce the concentration of pesticides. Results obtained during this study indicated that the higher the hydrophobicity of the organic compound and its molecular interaction with soil or root matrix the greater its tendency to concentrate in root tissues and the research showed the following trend: HCHs < diclofop-methyl < chlorpyrifos < methoxychlor < heptachlor epoxide < endrin < o,p'-DDE < heptachlor < dieldrin < aldrin < o,p'-DDT < p,p'-DDT by increasing order of log K ow values. The experimental results confirm the importance of vegetation in removing pollutants, obtaining remediation from 25% to 70%, and demonstrated that Ricinus communis L. can be used for the phytoremediation of such compounds.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of pesticides in rhizosphere and bulk soil obtained by experiment of phytoremediation using Ricinus communis L. in spiked soil at 2.0 μg g−1 (T2).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig2: Distribution of pesticides in rhizosphere and bulk soil obtained by experiment of phytoremediation using Ricinus communis L. in spiked soil at 2.0 μg g−1 (T2).

Mentions: Figure 2 compares rhizosphere and bulk soil samples for the studied plant in contaminated soil at 2.0 μg g−1 (T2). These results indicated that the rhizosphere soil presented a higher remediation for all the pesticides than the bulk soil. Interactions between the root system and its immediate surroundings (rhizosphere) may affect the behavior of these contaminants, modifying the system's physicochemical and microbiological properties and thus affecting this route of entry into the plants [29].


Evaluation of Ricinus communis L. for the Phytoremediation of Polluted Soil with Organochlorine Pesticides.

Rissato SR, Galhiane MS, Fernandes JR, Gerenutti M, Gomes HM, Ribeiro R, de Almeida MV - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Distribution of pesticides in rhizosphere and bulk soil obtained by experiment of phytoremediation using Ricinus communis L. in spiked soil at 2.0 μg g−1 (T2).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4537713&req=5

fig2: Distribution of pesticides in rhizosphere and bulk soil obtained by experiment of phytoremediation using Ricinus communis L. in spiked soil at 2.0 μg g−1 (T2).
Mentions: Figure 2 compares rhizosphere and bulk soil samples for the studied plant in contaminated soil at 2.0 μg g−1 (T2). These results indicated that the rhizosphere soil presented a higher remediation for all the pesticides than the bulk soil. Interactions between the root system and its immediate surroundings (rhizosphere) may affect the behavior of these contaminants, modifying the system's physicochemical and microbiological properties and thus affecting this route of entry into the plants [29].

Bottom Line: The contaminants tested were hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), DDT, heptachlor, aldrin, and others.Measurements made in rhizosphere soil indicate that the roots of the studied species reduce the concentration of pesticides.Results obtained during this study indicated that the higher the hydrophobicity of the organic compound and its molecular interaction with soil or root matrix the greater its tendency to concentrate in root tissues and the research showed the following trend: HCHs < diclofop-methyl < chlorpyrifos < methoxychlor < heptachlor epoxide < endrin < o,p'-DDE < heptachlor < dieldrin < aldrin < o,p'-DDT < p,p'-DDT by increasing order of log K ow values.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, Paulista State University (UNESP), CP 473, 17033-360 Bauru, SP, Brazil ; Department of Physics, Federal University of São Carlos (UFSCar), 13565-905 São Carlos, SP, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Phytoremediation is an attractive alternative to conventional treatments of soil due to advantages such as low cost, large application areas, and the possibility of in situ treatment. This study presents the assessment of phytoremediation processes conducted under controlled experimental conditions to evaluate the ability of Ricinus communis L., tropical plant species, to promote the degradation of 15 persistent organic pollutants (POPs), in a 66-day period. The contaminants tested were hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), DDT, heptachlor, aldrin, and others. Measurements made in rhizosphere soil indicate that the roots of the studied species reduce the concentration of pesticides. Results obtained during this study indicated that the higher the hydrophobicity of the organic compound and its molecular interaction with soil or root matrix the greater its tendency to concentrate in root tissues and the research showed the following trend: HCHs < diclofop-methyl < chlorpyrifos < methoxychlor < heptachlor epoxide < endrin < o,p'-DDE < heptachlor < dieldrin < aldrin < o,p'-DDT < p,p'-DDT by increasing order of log K ow values. The experimental results confirm the importance of vegetation in removing pollutants, obtaining remediation from 25% to 70%, and demonstrated that Ricinus communis L. can be used for the phytoremediation of such compounds.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus