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Household Solid Fuel Use and Cardiovascular Disease in Rural Areas in Shanxi, China.

Qu W, Yan Z, Qu G, Ikram M - Iran. J. Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: After adjusting for potential confounders, the use of household solid fuels was significantly associated with an increased risk for hypertension (OR 1.751), CHD (OR 2.251), stroke (OR 1.642), diabetes (OR 1.975) and dyslipidemia (OR 1.185).Residents with the highest tertile of the duration of household solid fuel exposure had an increased odd of hypertension (OR 1.651), stroke (OR 1.812), diabetes (OR 2.891) and dyslipidemia (OR 1.756) compared with those in the lowest tertile of the duration of solid fuel exposure.Our findings should be corroborated in longitudinal studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Management and Economics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: More than 80 percent of the China's population is located in the rural areas, 95 percent of which use coal, wood etc for cooking and heating. Limited by data availability, the association between household solid fuels and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) in China's rural areas is ignored in prior studies.

Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted from 2010-2012 and carried out on rural population aging 20-80 yr, comprised of 13877 participants from eighteen villages. Self-report questionnaire data were collected. Each outcome represents whether the participant has a kind of CVDs or not and it is reported in participants' questionnaire. Then the collected data is analyzed by logistic regression models with odds ratios (OR) and 95 percent confidence interval.

Results: After adjusting for potential confounders, the use of household solid fuels was significantly associated with an increased risk for hypertension (OR 1.751), CHD (OR 2.251), stroke (OR 1.642), diabetes (OR 1.975) and dyslipidemia (OR 1.185). Residents with the highest tertile of the duration of household solid fuel exposure had an increased odd of hypertension (OR 1.651), stroke (OR 1.812), diabetes (OR 2.891) and dyslipidemia (OR 1.756) compared with those in the lowest tertile of the duration of solid fuel exposure.

Conclusion: Indoor pollution exposure from household solid fuels combustion may be a positive risk factor for CVDs in the perspectives of China's rural population. Our findings should be corroborated in longitudinal studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The study design flowchart
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 1: The study design flowchart

Mentions: JCPH and we designed questionnaires in February 2010 to May 2010, and test the draft questionnaire in June 2010 to July 2010 (Fig. 1). There are 145320 rural inhabitants in Jingle county of China. We consider five percent of this population for our sample in our study, which was calculated as 7266 individuals. To enhance the power of study, we increased sample size up to 14100 individuals. Using a multistage sampling method, a random sample of 14100 individuals was selected randomly. At the first stage, six regional administrative towns were chosen as primary sampling units from all the fourteen administrative towns. Secondly, 3 villages were sampled from each town based on gender and age using a stratified multistage probability sampling method. Thirdly, 700∼800 individuals were selected based on simple random sampling.


Household Solid Fuel Use and Cardiovascular Disease in Rural Areas in Shanxi, China.

Qu W, Yan Z, Qu G, Ikram M - Iran. J. Public Health (2015)

The study design flowchart
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4537619&req=5

Figure 1: The study design flowchart
Mentions: JCPH and we designed questionnaires in February 2010 to May 2010, and test the draft questionnaire in June 2010 to July 2010 (Fig. 1). There are 145320 rural inhabitants in Jingle county of China. We consider five percent of this population for our sample in our study, which was calculated as 7266 individuals. To enhance the power of study, we increased sample size up to 14100 individuals. Using a multistage sampling method, a random sample of 14100 individuals was selected randomly. At the first stage, six regional administrative towns were chosen as primary sampling units from all the fourteen administrative towns. Secondly, 3 villages were sampled from each town based on gender and age using a stratified multistage probability sampling method. Thirdly, 700∼800 individuals were selected based on simple random sampling.

Bottom Line: After adjusting for potential confounders, the use of household solid fuels was significantly associated with an increased risk for hypertension (OR 1.751), CHD (OR 2.251), stroke (OR 1.642), diabetes (OR 1.975) and dyslipidemia (OR 1.185).Residents with the highest tertile of the duration of household solid fuel exposure had an increased odd of hypertension (OR 1.651), stroke (OR 1.812), diabetes (OR 2.891) and dyslipidemia (OR 1.756) compared with those in the lowest tertile of the duration of solid fuel exposure.Our findings should be corroborated in longitudinal studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Management and Economics, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: More than 80 percent of the China's population is located in the rural areas, 95 percent of which use coal, wood etc for cooking and heating. Limited by data availability, the association between household solid fuels and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) in China's rural areas is ignored in prior studies.

Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted from 2010-2012 and carried out on rural population aging 20-80 yr, comprised of 13877 participants from eighteen villages. Self-report questionnaire data were collected. Each outcome represents whether the participant has a kind of CVDs or not and it is reported in participants' questionnaire. Then the collected data is analyzed by logistic regression models with odds ratios (OR) and 95 percent confidence interval.

Results: After adjusting for potential confounders, the use of household solid fuels was significantly associated with an increased risk for hypertension (OR 1.751), CHD (OR 2.251), stroke (OR 1.642), diabetes (OR 1.975) and dyslipidemia (OR 1.185). Residents with the highest tertile of the duration of household solid fuel exposure had an increased odd of hypertension (OR 1.651), stroke (OR 1.812), diabetes (OR 2.891) and dyslipidemia (OR 1.756) compared with those in the lowest tertile of the duration of solid fuel exposure.

Conclusion: Indoor pollution exposure from household solid fuels combustion may be a positive risk factor for CVDs in the perspectives of China's rural population. Our findings should be corroborated in longitudinal studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus