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Power-Assisted Liposuction (P.A.L.) Fat Harvesting for Lipofilling: The Trap Device.

Codazzi D, Bruschi S, Robotti E, Bocchiotti MA - World J Plast Surg (2015)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Turin, San Giovanni Battista Hospital, Turin, Italy;

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The harvesting phase can be simplified by using the “trap device” instead of the conventional 10-cc Luer-Lock syringes... The harvesting phase can be simplified by using Power-Assisted Liposuction (P.A.L.) instead of the conventional 10-cc Luer-Lock syringes... The vibration allows easy penetration of even fibrous fat, while generating no thermal energy, thus no risk of cutaneous burns as compared with ultrasound liposuction... The rate of fat extraction is fast, while surgeon fatigue and intraoperative time are decreased, possibly also accounting in reduced intraoperative pain, postoperative edema and ecchymoses... Lipostructure by harvesting fat as described by Coleman is also rapidly gaining popularity worldwide, both as a stand-alone procedure and as an adjunct to other interventions, with wide both reconstructive and cosmetic indications... For instance, in our institution, we now add some form of lipofilling to practically any surgical step when reconstructiung a breast... It is to be noted that, especially for lipostructure in breast reconstruction, significant amounts of fat are often needed... Finally, it could be argued that this system is more traumatic to fat cells than the careful, low-pressure extraction via a Coleman harvesting cannula and a 10 ml syringe... We however believe that it is not so that the control rotating knob on the electric console directly administered (as shown by the number of blue light LEDs) the cannula top vibration range, while the hand piece allows further fine regulation of such range within the presaid parameters (for instance, three visible blue light LEDs administer a maximum cannula vibration range of 1,350 vibs/min; the hand piece can be then used, in proportion to digital pressure, to finely tune such range from 0 to indeed 1,350) (Figure 2)... We can conclude that the “trap device” for harvesting fat in P.A.L. liposuction is a convenient, wholly sterile, time saving method to provide fat for lipostructure in various part of the body... Time is saved and donor site morbidity minimized... The authors declare no conflict of interest.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The trap device: the wider bore tube on right side brings fat from the P.A.L. handle to the reservoir, while the other smaller bore one on the left connected the tank to a common aspirator
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Figure 1: The trap device: the wider bore tube on right side brings fat from the P.A.L. handle to the reservoir, while the other smaller bore one on the left connected the tank to a common aspirator

Mentions: We thought the same system would find ready application to fat harvesting if an efficient sterile fat trap could be fashioned. Thus, instead of directly connecting the plastic suction tube to a common aspirator, we deviced a trap composed of the reservoir of an “High Vacuum Wound Drainage System” of 600 cc (Medinorm Medizintechnik GmbH, Gewerbepark 7–9, D-66583 Spiesen-Elversberg, Germany) deprived of its two rubber caps. The P.A.L. tube was connected to the longest of the two beaks of the 600 cc reservoir by using the forefinger of a surgical glove as a gasket (both tube and beak were stiff and they otherwise would not fit one another); the other beak was directly connected with the tube of the customary aspirator. To avoid leaks and loss of suction, two small Opsites TM (Smith and Nephew, Inc 1450 E Brooks Rd Memphis, TN 38116) were used as an “insulating tape” around the two connections. The P.A.L. harvesting cannulas that we employed were a single-hole MicroAire of 3 mm in diameter (PAL-R300LS single-port) and a triple-hole MicroAire of 4 mm (PAL-R402LS Triport II) (Figure 1).


Power-Assisted Liposuction (P.A.L.) Fat Harvesting for Lipofilling: The Trap Device.

Codazzi D, Bruschi S, Robotti E, Bocchiotti MA - World J Plast Surg (2015)

The trap device: the wider bore tube on right side brings fat from the P.A.L. handle to the reservoir, while the other smaller bore one on the left connected the tank to a common aspirator
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4537612&req=5

Figure 1: The trap device: the wider bore tube on right side brings fat from the P.A.L. handle to the reservoir, while the other smaller bore one on the left connected the tank to a common aspirator
Mentions: We thought the same system would find ready application to fat harvesting if an efficient sterile fat trap could be fashioned. Thus, instead of directly connecting the plastic suction tube to a common aspirator, we deviced a trap composed of the reservoir of an “High Vacuum Wound Drainage System” of 600 cc (Medinorm Medizintechnik GmbH, Gewerbepark 7–9, D-66583 Spiesen-Elversberg, Germany) deprived of its two rubber caps. The P.A.L. tube was connected to the longest of the two beaks of the 600 cc reservoir by using the forefinger of a surgical glove as a gasket (both tube and beak were stiff and they otherwise would not fit one another); the other beak was directly connected with the tube of the customary aspirator. To avoid leaks and loss of suction, two small Opsites TM (Smith and Nephew, Inc 1450 E Brooks Rd Memphis, TN 38116) were used as an “insulating tape” around the two connections. The P.A.L. harvesting cannulas that we employed were a single-hole MicroAire of 3 mm in diameter (PAL-R300LS single-port) and a triple-hole MicroAire of 4 mm (PAL-R402LS Triport II) (Figure 1).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Turin, San Giovanni Battista Hospital, Turin, Italy;

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

The harvesting phase can be simplified by using the “trap device” instead of the conventional 10-cc Luer-Lock syringes... The harvesting phase can be simplified by using Power-Assisted Liposuction (P.A.L.) instead of the conventional 10-cc Luer-Lock syringes... The vibration allows easy penetration of even fibrous fat, while generating no thermal energy, thus no risk of cutaneous burns as compared with ultrasound liposuction... The rate of fat extraction is fast, while surgeon fatigue and intraoperative time are decreased, possibly also accounting in reduced intraoperative pain, postoperative edema and ecchymoses... Lipostructure by harvesting fat as described by Coleman is also rapidly gaining popularity worldwide, both as a stand-alone procedure and as an adjunct to other interventions, with wide both reconstructive and cosmetic indications... For instance, in our institution, we now add some form of lipofilling to practically any surgical step when reconstructiung a breast... It is to be noted that, especially for lipostructure in breast reconstruction, significant amounts of fat are often needed... Finally, it could be argued that this system is more traumatic to fat cells than the careful, low-pressure extraction via a Coleman harvesting cannula and a 10 ml syringe... We however believe that it is not so that the control rotating knob on the electric console directly administered (as shown by the number of blue light LEDs) the cannula top vibration range, while the hand piece allows further fine regulation of such range within the presaid parameters (for instance, three visible blue light LEDs administer a maximum cannula vibration range of 1,350 vibs/min; the hand piece can be then used, in proportion to digital pressure, to finely tune such range from 0 to indeed 1,350) (Figure 2)... We can conclude that the “trap device” for harvesting fat in P.A.L. liposuction is a convenient, wholly sterile, time saving method to provide fat for lipostructure in various part of the body... Time is saved and donor site morbidity minimized... The authors declare no conflict of interest.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus