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An assessment of the relevance of the home neighbourhood for understanding environmental influences on physical activity: how far from home do people roam?

Hillsdon M, Coombes E, Griew P, Jones A - Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act (2015)

Bottom Line: Sixty per cent of outdoors LMVPA took place outside of the proximal home neighbourhood (800 m buffer).Distances from home where median levels of LMVPA were undertaken varied by gender (p < 0.05), home location, area deprivation, and car ownership (all p < 0.001).Objectively measured physical activity appears to vary appreciably by participant characteristics and home location, although for many settings a large proportion is undertaken outside of the home neighbourhood, suggesting the characterisation of neighbourhoods close to home will fail to properly capture the environmental influences on physical activity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Life and Environmental Studies, Exeter University, Richards Building, St Lukes, Heavitree Road, Exeter, EX1 2LU, UK. m.hillsdon@exeter.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: The choice of geographical unit of analysis in studies of the built environment and physical activity has typically been restricted to the home neighbourhood where only a small proportion of physical activity may actually be undertaken. This study aimed to examine the distance from home at which physical activity takes place and how this varies by personal and neighbourhood characteristics.

Methods: A cross-sectional, population based study of 195 people in the North West region of England, aged 18 to 91 years, clustered in 60 localities (small geographical areas of ~125 households). Individual socio-demographic data were collected by computer-aided personal interviews and physical activity was characterised by accelerometer and Global Positioning System (GPS) data. The locations of periods of light, moderate and vigorous intensity physical activity (LMVPA) undertaken outdoors were linked to measures of the neighbourhood around the home and distance from home.

Results: Sixty per cent of outdoors LMVPA took place outside of the proximal home neighbourhood (800 m buffer). Distances from home where median levels of LMVPA were undertaken varied by gender (p < 0.05), home location, area deprivation, and car ownership (all p < 0.001).

Conclusions: Objectively measured physical activity appears to vary appreciably by participant characteristics and home location, although for many settings a large proportion is undertaken outside of the home neighbourhood, suggesting the characterisation of neighbourhoods close to home will fail to properly capture the environmental influences on physical activity.

No MeSH data available.


Median (and interquartile range) distance from home where outdoor LMVPA takes place by personal and neighbourhood characteristics
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Fig2: Median (and interquartile range) distance from home where outdoor LMVPA takes place by personal and neighbourhood characteristics

Mentions: Figure 1 shows that, overall, 60.5 % of outdoor LMVPA was undertaken outside the home neighbourhood, as defined by the area within 800 m of the home. Males, participants residing in rural areas and those in more affluent areas undertook a higher proportion of their LMVPA outside the home neighbourhood compared with other groups, but there was little difference between respondents according to their age. As anticipated, car owners also undertook more of their LMVPA outside the home neighbourhood. The median distance from home where LMVPA took place was associated with gender (p < 0.05), home neighbourhood location, area deprivation, and car ownership (all at p < 0.001) as shown in Fig. 2. As expected, differences in distance were in the same direction as those observed for comparisons of LMVPA inside and outside the neighbourhood.Fig. 1


An assessment of the relevance of the home neighbourhood for understanding environmental influences on physical activity: how far from home do people roam?

Hillsdon M, Coombes E, Griew P, Jones A - Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act (2015)

Median (and interquartile range) distance from home where outdoor LMVPA takes place by personal and neighbourhood characteristics
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4537551&req=5

Fig2: Median (and interquartile range) distance from home where outdoor LMVPA takes place by personal and neighbourhood characteristics
Mentions: Figure 1 shows that, overall, 60.5 % of outdoor LMVPA was undertaken outside the home neighbourhood, as defined by the area within 800 m of the home. Males, participants residing in rural areas and those in more affluent areas undertook a higher proportion of their LMVPA outside the home neighbourhood compared with other groups, but there was little difference between respondents according to their age. As anticipated, car owners also undertook more of their LMVPA outside the home neighbourhood. The median distance from home where LMVPA took place was associated with gender (p < 0.05), home neighbourhood location, area deprivation, and car ownership (all at p < 0.001) as shown in Fig. 2. As expected, differences in distance were in the same direction as those observed for comparisons of LMVPA inside and outside the neighbourhood.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Sixty per cent of outdoors LMVPA took place outside of the proximal home neighbourhood (800 m buffer).Distances from home where median levels of LMVPA were undertaken varied by gender (p < 0.05), home location, area deprivation, and car ownership (all p < 0.001).Objectively measured physical activity appears to vary appreciably by participant characteristics and home location, although for many settings a large proportion is undertaken outside of the home neighbourhood, suggesting the characterisation of neighbourhoods close to home will fail to properly capture the environmental influences on physical activity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Life and Environmental Studies, Exeter University, Richards Building, St Lukes, Heavitree Road, Exeter, EX1 2LU, UK. m.hillsdon@exeter.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT

Background: The choice of geographical unit of analysis in studies of the built environment and physical activity has typically been restricted to the home neighbourhood where only a small proportion of physical activity may actually be undertaken. This study aimed to examine the distance from home at which physical activity takes place and how this varies by personal and neighbourhood characteristics.

Methods: A cross-sectional, population based study of 195 people in the North West region of England, aged 18 to 91 years, clustered in 60 localities (small geographical areas of ~125 households). Individual socio-demographic data were collected by computer-aided personal interviews and physical activity was characterised by accelerometer and Global Positioning System (GPS) data. The locations of periods of light, moderate and vigorous intensity physical activity (LMVPA) undertaken outdoors were linked to measures of the neighbourhood around the home and distance from home.

Results: Sixty per cent of outdoors LMVPA took place outside of the proximal home neighbourhood (800 m buffer). Distances from home where median levels of LMVPA were undertaken varied by gender (p < 0.05), home location, area deprivation, and car ownership (all p < 0.001).

Conclusions: Objectively measured physical activity appears to vary appreciably by participant characteristics and home location, although for many settings a large proportion is undertaken outside of the home neighbourhood, suggesting the characterisation of neighbourhoods close to home will fail to properly capture the environmental influences on physical activity.

No MeSH data available.