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Evaluating the Effect of Copper Nanoparticles in Inhibiting Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Listeria monocytogenes Biofilm Formation.

Ghasemian E, Naghoni A, Rahvar H, Kialha M, Tabaraie B - Jundishapur J Microbiol (2015)

Bottom Line: The results for the surface assay showed a significant decrease in bacterial attachment and colonization on the CuNP-covered surfaces.Our data demonstrated that the CuNPs inhibited bacterial growth and that the CuNP-coated surfaces decreased the microbial count and the microbial biofilm formation.Such CuNP-coated surfaces can be used in medical devices and food industries, although further studies in order to measure their level of toxicity would be necessary.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: OCUVAC-Center of Ocular Inflammation and Infection, Laura Bassi Centers of Expertise, Institute of Specific Prophylaxis and Tropical Medicine, Center for Pathophysiology, Infectiology and Immunology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

ABSTRACT

Background: Biofilm formation is a major virulence factor in different bacteria. Biofilms allow bacteria to resist treatment with antibacterial agents. The biofilm formation on glass and steel surfaces, which are extremely useful surfaces in food industries and medical devices, has always had an important role in the distribution and transmission of infectious diseases.

Objectives: In this study, the effect of coating glass and steel surfaces by copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) in inhibiting the biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was examined.

Materials and methods: The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of synthesized CuNPs were measured against L. monocytogenes and P. aeruginosa by using the broth-dilution method. The cell-surface hydrophobicity of the selected bacteria was assessed using the bacterial adhesion to hydrocarbon (BATH) method. Also, the effect of the CuNP-coated surfaces on the biofilm formation of the selected bacteria was calculated via the surface assay.

Results: The MICs for the CuNPs according to the broth-dilution method were ≤ 16 mg/L for L. monocytogenes and ≤ 32 mg/L for P. aeruginosa. The hydrophobicity of P. aeruginosa and L. monocytogenes was calculated as 74% and 67%, respectively. The results for the surface assay showed a significant decrease in bacterial attachment and colonization on the CuNP-covered surfaces.

Conclusions: Our data demonstrated that the CuNPs inhibited bacterial growth and that the CuNP-coated surfaces decreased the microbial count and the microbial biofilm formation. Such CuNP-coated surfaces can be used in medical devices and food industries, although further studies in order to measure their level of toxicity would be necessary.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Biofilm Formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Listeria monocytogenesMeasured on various surfaces after 48 hours; 1, glass coated with copper nanoparticles; 2, steel coated with copper nanoparticles; 3, glass without copper nanoparticles; 4, steel without copper nanoparticles.
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fig19859: Biofilm Formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Listeria monocytogenesMeasured on various surfaces after 48 hours; 1, glass coated with copper nanoparticles; 2, steel coated with copper nanoparticles; 3, glass without copper nanoparticles; 4, steel without copper nanoparticles.

Mentions: The results of the MICs for the CuNPs via the broth-dilution method were ≤ 32 mg/L for P. aeruginosa and ≤ 16 mg/L for L. monocytogenes. According to the test performed to analyze microbial linkage to octane via the BATH assay, the hydrophobicity of P. aeruginosa and L. monocytogenes was calculated as 74% and 67%, respectively. The antibacterial effect of CuNPs against biofilm formation on steel and glass surface was assessed by the quantity of viable bacterial cells. The numbers of L. monocytogenes on the glass and steel coupons and also on the CuNP-coated glass and steel coupons after 48 hours were counted as 8.1 × 105, 1.3 × 106, 1.3 × 103, and 1.5 × 103, while the corresponding numbers for P. aeruginosa were counted as 8.9 × 105, 1.73 × 106, 1.9 × 103, and 2.2 × 103 (Figure 1). Figures 2 and 3 show the biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa and L. monocytogenes on various surfaces continuously over a 48-hour period as assessed via the surface assay. The highest rate of attachment and colonization of microorganisms was witnessed in the first 8 hours, which demonstrated different patterns in the surfaces coated with CuNPs. In this study, we investigated higher colonization on steel surfaces in comparison to glass surfaces for both bacteria, and also higher tendency to attach to steel surfaces for P. aeruginosa in comparison to L. monocytogenes.


Evaluating the Effect of Copper Nanoparticles in Inhibiting Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Listeria monocytogenes Biofilm Formation.

Ghasemian E, Naghoni A, Rahvar H, Kialha M, Tabaraie B - Jundishapur J Microbiol (2015)

Biofilm Formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Listeria monocytogenesMeasured on various surfaces after 48 hours; 1, glass coated with copper nanoparticles; 2, steel coated with copper nanoparticles; 3, glass without copper nanoparticles; 4, steel without copper nanoparticles.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4537522&req=5

fig19859: Biofilm Formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Listeria monocytogenesMeasured on various surfaces after 48 hours; 1, glass coated with copper nanoparticles; 2, steel coated with copper nanoparticles; 3, glass without copper nanoparticles; 4, steel without copper nanoparticles.
Mentions: The results of the MICs for the CuNPs via the broth-dilution method were ≤ 32 mg/L for P. aeruginosa and ≤ 16 mg/L for L. monocytogenes. According to the test performed to analyze microbial linkage to octane via the BATH assay, the hydrophobicity of P. aeruginosa and L. monocytogenes was calculated as 74% and 67%, respectively. The antibacterial effect of CuNPs against biofilm formation on steel and glass surface was assessed by the quantity of viable bacterial cells. The numbers of L. monocytogenes on the glass and steel coupons and also on the CuNP-coated glass and steel coupons after 48 hours were counted as 8.1 × 105, 1.3 × 106, 1.3 × 103, and 1.5 × 103, while the corresponding numbers for P. aeruginosa were counted as 8.9 × 105, 1.73 × 106, 1.9 × 103, and 2.2 × 103 (Figure 1). Figures 2 and 3 show the biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa and L. monocytogenes on various surfaces continuously over a 48-hour period as assessed via the surface assay. The highest rate of attachment and colonization of microorganisms was witnessed in the first 8 hours, which demonstrated different patterns in the surfaces coated with CuNPs. In this study, we investigated higher colonization on steel surfaces in comparison to glass surfaces for both bacteria, and also higher tendency to attach to steel surfaces for P. aeruginosa in comparison to L. monocytogenes.

Bottom Line: The results for the surface assay showed a significant decrease in bacterial attachment and colonization on the CuNP-covered surfaces.Our data demonstrated that the CuNPs inhibited bacterial growth and that the CuNP-coated surfaces decreased the microbial count and the microbial biofilm formation.Such CuNP-coated surfaces can be used in medical devices and food industries, although further studies in order to measure their level of toxicity would be necessary.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: OCUVAC-Center of Ocular Inflammation and Infection, Laura Bassi Centers of Expertise, Institute of Specific Prophylaxis and Tropical Medicine, Center for Pathophysiology, Infectiology and Immunology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

ABSTRACT

Background: Biofilm formation is a major virulence factor in different bacteria. Biofilms allow bacteria to resist treatment with antibacterial agents. The biofilm formation on glass and steel surfaces, which are extremely useful surfaces in food industries and medical devices, has always had an important role in the distribution and transmission of infectious diseases.

Objectives: In this study, the effect of coating glass and steel surfaces by copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) in inhibiting the biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was examined.

Materials and methods: The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of synthesized CuNPs were measured against L. monocytogenes and P. aeruginosa by using the broth-dilution method. The cell-surface hydrophobicity of the selected bacteria was assessed using the bacterial adhesion to hydrocarbon (BATH) method. Also, the effect of the CuNP-coated surfaces on the biofilm formation of the selected bacteria was calculated via the surface assay.

Results: The MICs for the CuNPs according to the broth-dilution method were ≤ 16 mg/L for L. monocytogenes and ≤ 32 mg/L for P. aeruginosa. The hydrophobicity of P. aeruginosa and L. monocytogenes was calculated as 74% and 67%, respectively. The results for the surface assay showed a significant decrease in bacterial attachment and colonization on the CuNP-covered surfaces.

Conclusions: Our data demonstrated that the CuNPs inhibited bacterial growth and that the CuNP-coated surfaces decreased the microbial count and the microbial biofilm formation. Such CuNP-coated surfaces can be used in medical devices and food industries, although further studies in order to measure their level of toxicity would be necessary.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus