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Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass and Vertical Banded Gastroplasty Induce Long-Term Changes on the Human Gut Microbiome Contributing to Fat Mass Regulation.

Tremaroli V, Karlsson F, Werling M, Ståhlman M, Kovatcheva-Datchary P, Olbers T, Fändriks L, le Roux CW, Nielsen J, Bäckhed F - Cell Metab. (2015)

Bottom Line: The two surgical procedures induced similar and durable changes on the gut microbiome that were not dependent on body mass index and resulted in altered levels of fecal and circulating metabolites compared with obese controls.By colonizing germ-free mice with stools from the patients, we demonstrated that the surgically altered microbiota promoted reduced fat deposition in recipient mice.These mice also had a lower respiratory quotient, indicating decreased utilization of carbohydrates as fuel.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Wallenberg Laboratory and Sahlgrenska Center for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, SE-413 45 Gothenburg, Sweden.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Gut Microbiome of RYGB and VBG Women in Comparison to Non-Operated Women (Ob) with BMI Matched to the Post-Surgical BMI of the Bariatric Surgery Patients(A) Gut microbiota composition. Scatter plot of median species abundance in RYGB and Ob, in VBG and Ob, and in Ob and OBS women. The genus affiliations of differentially abundant species are indicated by color (Adj. p < 0.05, Wilcoxon rank-sum test).(B) Functional differences in the microbiomes measured by the abundance of KOs. Each spot represents a KO, and red spots represent KOs whose abundance is significantly different. The number of KOs significantly increased (up) and depleted (down) is shown under each plot. The direction of change is defined as up being the title above and down being the title to the right of each plot. FC, fold change; CPM, counts per million. See also Table S5 and Figure S4.
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fig4: Gut Microbiome of RYGB and VBG Women in Comparison to Non-Operated Women (Ob) with BMI Matched to the Post-Surgical BMI of the Bariatric Surgery Patients(A) Gut microbiota composition. Scatter plot of median species abundance in RYGB and Ob, in VBG and Ob, and in Ob and OBS women. The genus affiliations of differentially abundant species are indicated by color (Adj. p < 0.05, Wilcoxon rank-sum test).(B) Functional differences in the microbiomes measured by the abundance of KOs. Each spot represents a KO, and red spots represent KOs whose abundance is significantly different. The number of KOs significantly increased (up) and depleted (down) is shown under each plot. The direction of change is defined as up being the title above and down being the title to the right of each plot. FC, fold change; CPM, counts per million. See also Table S5 and Figure S4.

Mentions: To control for differences in BMI, we compared the gut microbiome of RYGB and VBG patients with that of non-operated women (Ob, n = 9) with BMI matched to the post-surgical BMI of the RYGB and VBG patients (BMI = 31.9 ± 2.7 [SD]) (Table S1 and S5). The Ob group was selected from a larger cohort recently analyzed with methods comparable to those used here (Karlsson et al., 2013). We found again an expansion in Proteobacteria and a reduction in several clostridial species after RYGB, and also a significant increase in the relative abundance of three E. coli species in VBG (Figure 4A; Table S5).


Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass and Vertical Banded Gastroplasty Induce Long-Term Changes on the Human Gut Microbiome Contributing to Fat Mass Regulation.

Tremaroli V, Karlsson F, Werling M, Ståhlman M, Kovatcheva-Datchary P, Olbers T, Fändriks L, le Roux CW, Nielsen J, Bäckhed F - Cell Metab. (2015)

Gut Microbiome of RYGB and VBG Women in Comparison to Non-Operated Women (Ob) with BMI Matched to the Post-Surgical BMI of the Bariatric Surgery Patients(A) Gut microbiota composition. Scatter plot of median species abundance in RYGB and Ob, in VBG and Ob, and in Ob and OBS women. The genus affiliations of differentially abundant species are indicated by color (Adj. p < 0.05, Wilcoxon rank-sum test).(B) Functional differences in the microbiomes measured by the abundance of KOs. Each spot represents a KO, and red spots represent KOs whose abundance is significantly different. The number of KOs significantly increased (up) and depleted (down) is shown under each plot. The direction of change is defined as up being the title above and down being the title to the right of each plot. FC, fold change; CPM, counts per million. See also Table S5 and Figure S4.
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fig4: Gut Microbiome of RYGB and VBG Women in Comparison to Non-Operated Women (Ob) with BMI Matched to the Post-Surgical BMI of the Bariatric Surgery Patients(A) Gut microbiota composition. Scatter plot of median species abundance in RYGB and Ob, in VBG and Ob, and in Ob and OBS women. The genus affiliations of differentially abundant species are indicated by color (Adj. p < 0.05, Wilcoxon rank-sum test).(B) Functional differences in the microbiomes measured by the abundance of KOs. Each spot represents a KO, and red spots represent KOs whose abundance is significantly different. The number of KOs significantly increased (up) and depleted (down) is shown under each plot. The direction of change is defined as up being the title above and down being the title to the right of each plot. FC, fold change; CPM, counts per million. See also Table S5 and Figure S4.
Mentions: To control for differences in BMI, we compared the gut microbiome of RYGB and VBG patients with that of non-operated women (Ob, n = 9) with BMI matched to the post-surgical BMI of the RYGB and VBG patients (BMI = 31.9 ± 2.7 [SD]) (Table S1 and S5). The Ob group was selected from a larger cohort recently analyzed with methods comparable to those used here (Karlsson et al., 2013). We found again an expansion in Proteobacteria and a reduction in several clostridial species after RYGB, and also a significant increase in the relative abundance of three E. coli species in VBG (Figure 4A; Table S5).

Bottom Line: The two surgical procedures induced similar and durable changes on the gut microbiome that were not dependent on body mass index and resulted in altered levels of fecal and circulating metabolites compared with obese controls.By colonizing germ-free mice with stools from the patients, we demonstrated that the surgically altered microbiota promoted reduced fat deposition in recipient mice.These mice also had a lower respiratory quotient, indicating decreased utilization of carbohydrates as fuel.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Wallenberg Laboratory and Sahlgrenska Center for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, University of Gothenburg, SE-413 45 Gothenburg, Sweden.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus