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Conversational Interaction in the Scanner: Mentalizing during Language Processing as Revealed by MEG.

Bögels S, Barr DJ, Garrod S, Kessler K - Cereb. Cortex (2014)

Bottom Line: Our analysis of the neural processing of test phase utterances revealed recruitment of neural circuits associated with language (temporal cortex), episodic memory (e.g., medial temporal lobe), and mentalizing (temporo-parietal junction and ventromedial prefrontal cortex).The episodic memory and language circuits were recruited in anticipation of upcoming referring expressions, suggesting that context-sensitive predictions were spontaneously generated.In contrast, the mentalizing areas were recruited on-demand, as a means for detecting and resolving perceived pragmatic anomalies, with little evidence they were activated to make partner-specific predictions about upcoming linguistic utterances.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Theta-power sources localized for the post-naming interval by means of DICS (see Methods). Sources in red show a power increase in 3–7 Hz for the same-speaker precedent mismatch as compared with the no precedent condition (Panel A) or as a result of an interaction between speaker and precedent (Panel B). The color-coded scale represents t-values. Labels are L for left and R for right hemisphere; SM1, primary sensori-motor cortex; PMC, premotor cortex; PPC, posterior parietal cortex; OCC, occipital cortex; latPFC, lateral prefrontal cortex; TP, temporal pole; TC, temporal cortex; TPJ, temporo-parietal junction; PHG, parahippocampal gyrus; PC, precuneus; vmPFC, ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Further explanations are given in the text and Supplementary Table S1.
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BHU116F4: Theta-power sources localized for the post-naming interval by means of DICS (see Methods). Sources in red show a power increase in 3–7 Hz for the same-speaker precedent mismatch as compared with the no precedent condition (Panel A) or as a result of an interaction between speaker and precedent (Panel B). The color-coded scale represents t-values. Labels are L for left and R for right hemisphere; SM1, primary sensori-motor cortex; PMC, premotor cortex; PPC, posterior parietal cortex; OCC, occipital cortex; latPFC, lateral prefrontal cortex; TP, temporal pole; TC, temporal cortex; TPJ, temporo-parietal junction; PHG, parahippocampal gyrus; PC, precuneus; vmPFC, ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Further explanations are given in the text and Supplementary Table S1.

Mentions: We localized the sources of the observed sensor-level theta effect (same speaker: precedent mismatch vs. no precedent; see Fig. 3, top row) using DICS (see Methods) collapsing over a post-naming time window between 200 and 800 ms (to include ∼3 theta cycles) and 3 to 7 Hz. We chose these parameters to cover the maximum of the sensor-level effects across time samples and frequencies. The findings for the same-speaker, precedent effect (1 spatially distributed cluster, P = 0.028) are shown in Figure 4, Panel A (and Supplementary Table S1, Panel A) and revealed sources in areas that previous research (see Introduction) has related to: (1) mentalizing (right TPJ, ventromedial prefrontal cortex vmPFC, right PC), (2) episodic working memory including executive function (right parahippocampal gyrus PHG, left lateral (lat)PFC), (3) language (left temporal cortex TC, including left temporal pole TP), (4) attention (right posterior parietal cortex, PPC), and (5) motor functions (left lateral premotor and motor cortex, PMC). This source pattern conformed very strongly to our expectations regarding functional processing networks interacting in the post-naming interval (see Introduction).Figure 4.


Conversational Interaction in the Scanner: Mentalizing during Language Processing as Revealed by MEG.

Bögels S, Barr DJ, Garrod S, Kessler K - Cereb. Cortex (2014)

Theta-power sources localized for the post-naming interval by means of DICS (see Methods). Sources in red show a power increase in 3–7 Hz for the same-speaker precedent mismatch as compared with the no precedent condition (Panel A) or as a result of an interaction between speaker and precedent (Panel B). The color-coded scale represents t-values. Labels are L for left and R for right hemisphere; SM1, primary sensori-motor cortex; PMC, premotor cortex; PPC, posterior parietal cortex; OCC, occipital cortex; latPFC, lateral prefrontal cortex; TP, temporal pole; TC, temporal cortex; TPJ, temporo-parietal junction; PHG, parahippocampal gyrus; PC, precuneus; vmPFC, ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Further explanations are given in the text and Supplementary Table S1.
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BHU116F4: Theta-power sources localized for the post-naming interval by means of DICS (see Methods). Sources in red show a power increase in 3–7 Hz for the same-speaker precedent mismatch as compared with the no precedent condition (Panel A) or as a result of an interaction between speaker and precedent (Panel B). The color-coded scale represents t-values. Labels are L for left and R for right hemisphere; SM1, primary sensori-motor cortex; PMC, premotor cortex; PPC, posterior parietal cortex; OCC, occipital cortex; latPFC, lateral prefrontal cortex; TP, temporal pole; TC, temporal cortex; TPJ, temporo-parietal junction; PHG, parahippocampal gyrus; PC, precuneus; vmPFC, ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Further explanations are given in the text and Supplementary Table S1.
Mentions: We localized the sources of the observed sensor-level theta effect (same speaker: precedent mismatch vs. no precedent; see Fig. 3, top row) using DICS (see Methods) collapsing over a post-naming time window between 200 and 800 ms (to include ∼3 theta cycles) and 3 to 7 Hz. We chose these parameters to cover the maximum of the sensor-level effects across time samples and frequencies. The findings for the same-speaker, precedent effect (1 spatially distributed cluster, P = 0.028) are shown in Figure 4, Panel A (and Supplementary Table S1, Panel A) and revealed sources in areas that previous research (see Introduction) has related to: (1) mentalizing (right TPJ, ventromedial prefrontal cortex vmPFC, right PC), (2) episodic working memory including executive function (right parahippocampal gyrus PHG, left lateral (lat)PFC), (3) language (left temporal cortex TC, including left temporal pole TP), (4) attention (right posterior parietal cortex, PPC), and (5) motor functions (left lateral premotor and motor cortex, PMC). This source pattern conformed very strongly to our expectations regarding functional processing networks interacting in the post-naming interval (see Introduction).Figure 4.

Bottom Line: Our analysis of the neural processing of test phase utterances revealed recruitment of neural circuits associated with language (temporal cortex), episodic memory (e.g., medial temporal lobe), and mentalizing (temporo-parietal junction and ventromedial prefrontal cortex).The episodic memory and language circuits were recruited in anticipation of upcoming referring expressions, suggesting that context-sensitive predictions were spontaneously generated.In contrast, the mentalizing areas were recruited on-demand, as a means for detecting and resolving perceived pragmatic anomalies, with little evidence they were activated to make partner-specific predictions about upcoming linguistic utterances.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, The Netherlands Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus