Limits...
The Neonatal Connectome During Preterm Brain Development.

van den Heuvel MP, Kersbergen KJ, de Reus MA, Keunen K, Kahn RS, Groenendaal F, de Vries LS, Benders MJ - Cereb. Cortex (2014)

Bottom Line: The human connectome is the result of an elaborate developmental trajectory.Analysis of brain development between week 30 and week 40 GA revealed clear developmental effects in neonatal connectome architecture, including a significant increase in white matter microstructure (P < 0.01), small-world topology (P < 0.01) and interhemispheric FC (P < 0.01).Taken together, we conclude that hallmark organizational structures of the human connectome are present before term birth and subject to early development.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherlands Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, The Netherlands.

No MeSH data available.


Development of structural connectivity and network characteristics (longitudinal analysis). Of 7 neonates, longitudinal assessment of brain development was possible, on the basis of a structural and functional MRI measurement at both (around) week 30 and week 40 gestational age (GA). Longitudinal analysis confirmed developmental changes in structural and functional properties of the neonatal brain network. White matter microstructure showed a clear development between week 30 and week 40 GA in all 4 neonates, including a significant increase in fractional anisotropy (FA), a decrease in mean diffusivity (MD) of white matter and an increase in small-world (SW) properties of the network. Furthermore, confirming the cross-sectional findings, integration capacity showed a significant increase during week 30 and week 40 GA.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4537441&req=5

BHU095F6: Development of structural connectivity and network characteristics (longitudinal analysis). Of 7 neonates, longitudinal assessment of brain development was possible, on the basis of a structural and functional MRI measurement at both (around) week 30 and week 40 gestational age (GA). Longitudinal analysis confirmed developmental changes in structural and functional properties of the neonatal brain network. White matter microstructure showed a clear development between week 30 and week 40 GA in all 4 neonates, including a significant increase in fractional anisotropy (FA), a decrease in mean diffusivity (MD) of white matter and an increase in small-world (SW) properties of the network. Furthermore, confirming the cross-sectional findings, integration capacity showed a significant increase during week 30 and week 40 GA.

Mentions: The increase in white matter microstructure was confirmed in the longitudinal analysis (7 neonates were scanned both around 30 weeks and around 40 weeks), showing a significant increase in FA (P < 0.001, Fig. 6) and a significant decrease in MD (P = 0.005, Fig. 6), TD (P < 0.001), and PD (P = 0.0014). All tests survived Bonferroni correction for multiple testing.


The Neonatal Connectome During Preterm Brain Development.

van den Heuvel MP, Kersbergen KJ, de Reus MA, Keunen K, Kahn RS, Groenendaal F, de Vries LS, Benders MJ - Cereb. Cortex (2014)

Development of structural connectivity and network characteristics (longitudinal analysis). Of 7 neonates, longitudinal assessment of brain development was possible, on the basis of a structural and functional MRI measurement at both (around) week 30 and week 40 gestational age (GA). Longitudinal analysis confirmed developmental changes in structural and functional properties of the neonatal brain network. White matter microstructure showed a clear development between week 30 and week 40 GA in all 4 neonates, including a significant increase in fractional anisotropy (FA), a decrease in mean diffusivity (MD) of white matter and an increase in small-world (SW) properties of the network. Furthermore, confirming the cross-sectional findings, integration capacity showed a significant increase during week 30 and week 40 GA.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4537441&req=5

BHU095F6: Development of structural connectivity and network characteristics (longitudinal analysis). Of 7 neonates, longitudinal assessment of brain development was possible, on the basis of a structural and functional MRI measurement at both (around) week 30 and week 40 gestational age (GA). Longitudinal analysis confirmed developmental changes in structural and functional properties of the neonatal brain network. White matter microstructure showed a clear development between week 30 and week 40 GA in all 4 neonates, including a significant increase in fractional anisotropy (FA), a decrease in mean diffusivity (MD) of white matter and an increase in small-world (SW) properties of the network. Furthermore, confirming the cross-sectional findings, integration capacity showed a significant increase during week 30 and week 40 GA.
Mentions: The increase in white matter microstructure was confirmed in the longitudinal analysis (7 neonates were scanned both around 30 weeks and around 40 weeks), showing a significant increase in FA (P < 0.001, Fig. 6) and a significant decrease in MD (P = 0.005, Fig. 6), TD (P < 0.001), and PD (P = 0.0014). All tests survived Bonferroni correction for multiple testing.

Bottom Line: The human connectome is the result of an elaborate developmental trajectory.Analysis of brain development between week 30 and week 40 GA revealed clear developmental effects in neonatal connectome architecture, including a significant increase in white matter microstructure (P < 0.01), small-world topology (P < 0.01) and interhemispheric FC (P < 0.01).Taken together, we conclude that hallmark organizational structures of the human connectome are present before term birth and subject to early development.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherlands Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, The Netherlands.

No MeSH data available.