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Network Interactions Explain Sensitivity to Dynamic Faces in the Superior Temporal Sulcus.

Furl N, Henson RN, Friston KJ, Calder AJ - Cereb. Cortex (2014)

Bottom Line: The superior temporal sulcus (STS) in the human and monkey is sensitive to the motion of complex forms such as facial and bodily actions.We then tested various connectivity models that modeled communication between the ventral form and dorsal motion pathways.We show that facial form information modulated transmission of motion information from V5 to the STS, and that this face-selective modulation likely originated in OFA.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge CB2 7EF, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Group-level region-of-interest (ROI) analysis. (a) Mean responses in Brodmann area 18 (BA18) to faces, objects, and random-dot patterns; (b) mean responses in V5; (c) mean responses in the superior temporal sulcus (STS); (d) mean responses in the occipital face area (OFA); (e) mean responses in the fusiform face area (FFA). Graph titles describe contrast used to define ROI.
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BHU083F2: Group-level region-of-interest (ROI) analysis. (a) Mean responses in Brodmann area 18 (BA18) to faces, objects, and random-dot patterns; (b) mean responses in V5; (c) mean responses in the superior temporal sulcus (STS); (d) mean responses in the occipital face area (OFA); (e) mean responses in the fusiform face area (FFA). Graph titles describe contrast used to define ROI.

Mentions: Figure 2 shows the response patterns in our ROIs at the group level using ANOVAs with motion (dynamic or static) and category (face, object, or pattern) as factors, followed by post hoc tests (Tukey honest significant difference corrected P < 0.05). Some of the ANOVA effects duplicate the contrasts used to define the ROIs including the main effect of category in face-selective ROIs and the mean effect of motion in motion-sensitive ROIs. We include these tests here for completeness and to illustrate the quantitative patterns of means within the voxels identified in the ROIs However, our main conclusions from the ROI analyses are drawn from orthogonal ANOVA effects to preclude biased inferences. These include effects of motion in face-selective ROIs and effects of category in motion-sensitive ROIs.Figure 2.


Network Interactions Explain Sensitivity to Dynamic Faces in the Superior Temporal Sulcus.

Furl N, Henson RN, Friston KJ, Calder AJ - Cereb. Cortex (2014)

Group-level region-of-interest (ROI) analysis. (a) Mean responses in Brodmann area 18 (BA18) to faces, objects, and random-dot patterns; (b) mean responses in V5; (c) mean responses in the superior temporal sulcus (STS); (d) mean responses in the occipital face area (OFA); (e) mean responses in the fusiform face area (FFA). Graph titles describe contrast used to define ROI.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4537434&req=5

BHU083F2: Group-level region-of-interest (ROI) analysis. (a) Mean responses in Brodmann area 18 (BA18) to faces, objects, and random-dot patterns; (b) mean responses in V5; (c) mean responses in the superior temporal sulcus (STS); (d) mean responses in the occipital face area (OFA); (e) mean responses in the fusiform face area (FFA). Graph titles describe contrast used to define ROI.
Mentions: Figure 2 shows the response patterns in our ROIs at the group level using ANOVAs with motion (dynamic or static) and category (face, object, or pattern) as factors, followed by post hoc tests (Tukey honest significant difference corrected P < 0.05). Some of the ANOVA effects duplicate the contrasts used to define the ROIs including the main effect of category in face-selective ROIs and the mean effect of motion in motion-sensitive ROIs. We include these tests here for completeness and to illustrate the quantitative patterns of means within the voxels identified in the ROIs However, our main conclusions from the ROI analyses are drawn from orthogonal ANOVA effects to preclude biased inferences. These include effects of motion in face-selective ROIs and effects of category in motion-sensitive ROIs.Figure 2.

Bottom Line: The superior temporal sulcus (STS) in the human and monkey is sensitive to the motion of complex forms such as facial and bodily actions.We then tested various connectivity models that modeled communication between the ventral form and dorsal motion pathways.We show that facial form information modulated transmission of motion information from V5 to the STS, and that this face-selective modulation likely originated in OFA.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge CB2 7EF, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus