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Network Interactions Explain Sensitivity to Dynamic Faces in the Superior Temporal Sulcus.

Furl N, Henson RN, Friston KJ, Calder AJ - Cereb. Cortex (2014)

Bottom Line: The superior temporal sulcus (STS) in the human and monkey is sensitive to the motion of complex forms such as facial and bodily actions.We then tested various connectivity models that modeled communication between the ventral form and dorsal motion pathways.We show that facial form information modulated transmission of motion information from V5 to the STS, and that this face-selective modulation likely originated in OFA.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge CB2 7EF, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Group-level whole-brain analysis. (a) Results of contrast (dynamic faces > static faces) > (dynamic nonfaces > static nonfaces). (b) Voxels showing significant effects at P < 0.005 (uncorrected) are projected on an inflated cortical surface of the right hemisphere in MNI space. STS, superior temporal sulcus.
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BHU083F1: Group-level whole-brain analysis. (a) Results of contrast (dynamic faces > static faces) > (dynamic nonfaces > static nonfaces). (b) Voxels showing significant effects at P < 0.005 (uncorrected) are projected on an inflated cortical surface of the right hemisphere in MNI space. STS, superior temporal sulcus.

Mentions: We located ROIs in individual participants. We used the contrast of faces, objects and patterns versus fixation to identify BA18; the contrast of dynamic and static faces versus dynamic and static objects and patterns to identify the conventional face-selective areas OFA and FFA; the contrast of dynamic versus static faces to identify the motion-sensitive area V5; and the contrast (dynamic faces > static faces) > (dynamic objects/patterns > static objects/patterns) to identify face-specific motion sensitivity in the STS. For display purposes, Figure 1 illustrates the results of this contrast in the STS at the group level, using the 11 participants who showed every ROI (peak voxel MNI: 56 −24 −8). This STS area was observed at P < 0.005 uncorrected where it also met the P < 0.0001 threshold for familywise error correction at the cluster level (Brett et al. 2003).Figure 1.


Network Interactions Explain Sensitivity to Dynamic Faces in the Superior Temporal Sulcus.

Furl N, Henson RN, Friston KJ, Calder AJ - Cereb. Cortex (2014)

Group-level whole-brain analysis. (a) Results of contrast (dynamic faces > static faces) > (dynamic nonfaces > static nonfaces). (b) Voxels showing significant effects at P < 0.005 (uncorrected) are projected on an inflated cortical surface of the right hemisphere in MNI space. STS, superior temporal sulcus.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4537434&req=5

BHU083F1: Group-level whole-brain analysis. (a) Results of contrast (dynamic faces > static faces) > (dynamic nonfaces > static nonfaces). (b) Voxels showing significant effects at P < 0.005 (uncorrected) are projected on an inflated cortical surface of the right hemisphere in MNI space. STS, superior temporal sulcus.
Mentions: We located ROIs in individual participants. We used the contrast of faces, objects and patterns versus fixation to identify BA18; the contrast of dynamic and static faces versus dynamic and static objects and patterns to identify the conventional face-selective areas OFA and FFA; the contrast of dynamic versus static faces to identify the motion-sensitive area V5; and the contrast (dynamic faces > static faces) > (dynamic objects/patterns > static objects/patterns) to identify face-specific motion sensitivity in the STS. For display purposes, Figure 1 illustrates the results of this contrast in the STS at the group level, using the 11 participants who showed every ROI (peak voxel MNI: 56 −24 −8). This STS area was observed at P < 0.005 uncorrected where it also met the P < 0.0001 threshold for familywise error correction at the cluster level (Brett et al. 2003).Figure 1.

Bottom Line: The superior temporal sulcus (STS) in the human and monkey is sensitive to the motion of complex forms such as facial and bodily actions.We then tested various connectivity models that modeled communication between the ventral form and dorsal motion pathways.We show that facial form information modulated transmission of motion information from V5 to the STS, and that this face-selective modulation likely originated in OFA.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge CB2 7EF, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus