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Coordinated Information Generation and Mental Flexibility: Large-Scale Network Disruption in Children with Autism.

Mišić B, Doesburg SM, Fatima Z, Vidal J, Vakorin VA, Taylor MJ, McIntosh AR - Cereb. Cortex (2014)

Bottom Line: Multivariate partial least-squares analysis revealed 2 distributed networks, operating at fast and slow time scales, that respond completely differently to set shifting in ASD compared with control children, indicating disrupted temporal organization within these networks.When children with ASD engaged these networks, there was no improvement in performance, suggesting that the networks were ineffective in children with ASD.Our data demonstrate that the coordination and temporal organization of large-scale neural assemblies during the performance of cognitive control tasks is disrupted in children with ASD, contributing to executive function deficits in this group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest Centre, Toronto, Canada Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Relation between MSE and behavior. (A) Group mean reaction times in the set-shifting task. Errors bars represent standard errors of the mean. (B) Correlations between reaction times and the degree to which individual participants express the networks identified by the MSE–PLS analysis in Figure 5B (brain scores).
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BHU082F6: Relation between MSE and behavior. (A) Group mean reaction times in the set-shifting task. Errors bars represent standard errors of the mean. (B) Correlations between reaction times and the degree to which individual participants express the networks identified by the MSE–PLS analysis in Figure 5B (brain scores).

Mentions: Figure 6A displays the reaction times for children with ASD and typically developing controls in the 2 tasks. For the typically developing controls, reaction times were significantly longer for ED1 trials compared with ED3 trials (P < 0.02), but there was no significant difference between ID1 and ID3 trials (P = 0.54). Similarly, for children with ASD, reaction times were significantly longer for ED1 trials compared with ED3 trials (P < 0.05), but there was no significant difference between ID1 and ID3 trials (P = 0.17). Comparing the 2 groups, there was no significant difference between children with ASD and controls on either ED1 (P = 0.5) or ID1 (P = 0.49) trials.Figure 6.


Coordinated Information Generation and Mental Flexibility: Large-Scale Network Disruption in Children with Autism.

Mišić B, Doesburg SM, Fatima Z, Vidal J, Vakorin VA, Taylor MJ, McIntosh AR - Cereb. Cortex (2014)

Relation between MSE and behavior. (A) Group mean reaction times in the set-shifting task. Errors bars represent standard errors of the mean. (B) Correlations between reaction times and the degree to which individual participants express the networks identified by the MSE–PLS analysis in Figure 5B (brain scores).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4537433&req=5

BHU082F6: Relation between MSE and behavior. (A) Group mean reaction times in the set-shifting task. Errors bars represent standard errors of the mean. (B) Correlations between reaction times and the degree to which individual participants express the networks identified by the MSE–PLS analysis in Figure 5B (brain scores).
Mentions: Figure 6A displays the reaction times for children with ASD and typically developing controls in the 2 tasks. For the typically developing controls, reaction times were significantly longer for ED1 trials compared with ED3 trials (P < 0.02), but there was no significant difference between ID1 and ID3 trials (P = 0.54). Similarly, for children with ASD, reaction times were significantly longer for ED1 trials compared with ED3 trials (P < 0.05), but there was no significant difference between ID1 and ID3 trials (P = 0.17). Comparing the 2 groups, there was no significant difference between children with ASD and controls on either ED1 (P = 0.5) or ID1 (P = 0.49) trials.Figure 6.

Bottom Line: Multivariate partial least-squares analysis revealed 2 distributed networks, operating at fast and slow time scales, that respond completely differently to set shifting in ASD compared with control children, indicating disrupted temporal organization within these networks.When children with ASD engaged these networks, there was no improvement in performance, suggesting that the networks were ineffective in children with ASD.Our data demonstrate that the coordination and temporal organization of large-scale neural assemblies during the performance of cognitive control tasks is disrupted in children with ASD, contributing to executive function deficits in this group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest Centre, Toronto, Canada Department of Psychology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus