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Neural Mechanism for Mirrored Self-face Recognition.

Sugiura M, Miyauchi CM, Kotozaki Y, Akimoto Y, Nozawa T, Yomogida Y, Hanawa S, Yamamoto Y, Sakuma A, Nakagawa S, Kawashima R - Cereb. Cortex (2014)

Bottom Line: The effect of the contingency cue was identified in the cuneus.Semantic- or integration-level processes, including amodal self-representation and belief validation, which allow modality-independent self-recognition and the resolution of potential conflicts between perceptual cues, respectively, were identified in distinct regions in the right frontal and insular cortices.The results are supportive of the multicomponent notion of self-recognition and suggest a critical role for contingency detection in the co-emergence of self-recognition and empathy in infants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8575, Japan International Research Institute of Disaster Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8575, Japan.

No MeSH data available.


Design of the analyses. (a) Four conditions were assessed using a 2-by-2 factorial design composed of 2 factors: Contingency (Real-time, Delayed) and Face (Self, Other). Expected activation profiles for the main effects of Contingency (b) and Face (c) assumed responses to the contingency and figurative cues, respectively (i.e., perception-level processes). Expected activation profiles for negative interaction assumed 2 semantic-level processes: the amodal self-representation (d) and the belief-validation process (e). The Static condition was used post hoc to examine whether the identified face effect was dependent on facial motion.
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BHU077F2: Design of the analyses. (a) Four conditions were assessed using a 2-by-2 factorial design composed of 2 factors: Contingency (Real-time, Delayed) and Face (Self, Other). Expected activation profiles for the main effects of Contingency (b) and Face (c) assumed responses to the contingency and figurative cues, respectively (i.e., perception-level processes). Expected activation profiles for negative interaction assumed 2 semantic-level processes: the amodal self-representation (d) and the belief-validation process (e). The Static condition was used post hoc to examine whether the identified face effect was dependent on facial motion.

Mentions: A voxel-by-voxel statistical inference on the contrasts of the parameter estimates was performed on the second-level between-subject (random effects) model, using one-sample t-tests. First, the main effects and their interactions were examined in a 2-by-2 factorial design composed of the Contingency (Real-time, Delayed) and Face factors (Self, Other) (Fig. 2a). The threshold for significant activation was initially set at P < 0.001 (uncorrected); it was then corrected to P < 0.05 for multiple comparisons using cluster size assuming the whole brain as the search volume. A region-of-interest analysis was then performed using the activation peaks identified in the contrast between the main effects of Face and negative interaction; the areas identified in the 2 contrasts overlapped considerably (see Results). The analysis was intended for detailed functional segregation using 3 additional contrasts at a liberal threshold (P< 0.05, without correction for multiple comparisons).Figure 2.


Neural Mechanism for Mirrored Self-face Recognition.

Sugiura M, Miyauchi CM, Kotozaki Y, Akimoto Y, Nozawa T, Yomogida Y, Hanawa S, Yamamoto Y, Sakuma A, Nakagawa S, Kawashima R - Cereb. Cortex (2014)

Design of the analyses. (a) Four conditions were assessed using a 2-by-2 factorial design composed of 2 factors: Contingency (Real-time, Delayed) and Face (Self, Other). Expected activation profiles for the main effects of Contingency (b) and Face (c) assumed responses to the contingency and figurative cues, respectively (i.e., perception-level processes). Expected activation profiles for negative interaction assumed 2 semantic-level processes: the amodal self-representation (d) and the belief-validation process (e). The Static condition was used post hoc to examine whether the identified face effect was dependent on facial motion.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4537432&req=5

BHU077F2: Design of the analyses. (a) Four conditions were assessed using a 2-by-2 factorial design composed of 2 factors: Contingency (Real-time, Delayed) and Face (Self, Other). Expected activation profiles for the main effects of Contingency (b) and Face (c) assumed responses to the contingency and figurative cues, respectively (i.e., perception-level processes). Expected activation profiles for negative interaction assumed 2 semantic-level processes: the amodal self-representation (d) and the belief-validation process (e). The Static condition was used post hoc to examine whether the identified face effect was dependent on facial motion.
Mentions: A voxel-by-voxel statistical inference on the contrasts of the parameter estimates was performed on the second-level between-subject (random effects) model, using one-sample t-tests. First, the main effects and their interactions were examined in a 2-by-2 factorial design composed of the Contingency (Real-time, Delayed) and Face factors (Self, Other) (Fig. 2a). The threshold for significant activation was initially set at P < 0.001 (uncorrected); it was then corrected to P < 0.05 for multiple comparisons using cluster size assuming the whole brain as the search volume. A region-of-interest analysis was then performed using the activation peaks identified in the contrast between the main effects of Face and negative interaction; the areas identified in the 2 contrasts overlapped considerably (see Results). The analysis was intended for detailed functional segregation using 3 additional contrasts at a liberal threshold (P< 0.05, without correction for multiple comparisons).Figure 2.

Bottom Line: The effect of the contingency cue was identified in the cuneus.Semantic- or integration-level processes, including amodal self-representation and belief validation, which allow modality-independent self-recognition and the resolution of potential conflicts between perceptual cues, respectively, were identified in distinct regions in the right frontal and insular cortices.The results are supportive of the multicomponent notion of self-recognition and suggest a critical role for contingency detection in the co-emergence of self-recognition and empathy in infants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8575, Japan International Research Institute of Disaster Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8575, Japan.

No MeSH data available.