Limits...
Neural Mechanism for Mirrored Self-face Recognition.

Sugiura M, Miyauchi CM, Kotozaki Y, Akimoto Y, Nozawa T, Yomogida Y, Hanawa S, Yamamoto Y, Sakuma A, Nakagawa S, Kawashima R - Cereb. Cortex (2014)

Bottom Line: The effect of the contingency cue was identified in the cuneus.Semantic- or integration-level processes, including amodal self-representation and belief validation, which allow modality-independent self-recognition and the resolution of potential conflicts between perceptual cues, respectively, were identified in distinct regions in the right frontal and insular cortices.The results are supportive of the multicomponent notion of self-recognition and suggest a critical role for contingency detection in the co-emergence of self-recognition and empathy in infants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8575, Japan International Research Institute of Disaster Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8575, Japan.

No MeSH data available.


Experimental equipment and task. (a) Virtual mirror system installed in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. A video of the subject's face was shot via a half-mirror and stored on a personal computer (PC). The real-time, delayed, or prerecorded video from the PC was projected onto a semilucent screen behind the head coil, and the subject viewed it via a mirror. (b) Examples of the visual stimuli and the time courses of the subject's facial action and the visual stimuli under the Real-time, Delayed (500 ms), and Static conditions. Each subject quickly opened his mouth as soon as the prompt (a small circle overlaid on the image) appeared, and then immediately closed it.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4537432&req=5

BHU077F1: Experimental equipment and task. (a) Virtual mirror system installed in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. A video of the subject's face was shot via a half-mirror and stored on a personal computer (PC). The real-time, delayed, or prerecorded video from the PC was projected onto a semilucent screen behind the head coil, and the subject viewed it via a mirror. (b) Examples of the visual stimuli and the time courses of the subject's facial action and the visual stimuli under the Real-time, Delayed (500 ms), and Static conditions. Each subject quickly opened his mouth as soon as the prompt (a small circle overlaid on the image) appeared, and then immediately closed it.

Mentions: The system is schematically illustrated in Figure 1a. Subjects lay on the bed of an MRI scanner with their heads fixed in the MRI head coil using elastic blocks. The head component of a SENSE head spine coil (Philips, Best, the Netherlands) was used as the open-face head coil. A high-speed (250 fps) video camera SVS340CUCP (SVS-VISTEK, Seefeld, Germany) viewed the subject's face via a half-mirror attached to the head coil. The image was projected onto a semilucent screen behind the head coil using an Endeavor Pro4700 (Epson, Suwa, Japan) and a DLA-HD10K LCD projector (JVC, Wayne, NJ, USA). Custom software (Physiotech, Tokyo, Japan) allowed presentation of a quasi-real-time (<60-ms delay), delayed-real-time, or prerecorded video. The subjects viewed the screen via a mirror.Figure 1.


Neural Mechanism for Mirrored Self-face Recognition.

Sugiura M, Miyauchi CM, Kotozaki Y, Akimoto Y, Nozawa T, Yomogida Y, Hanawa S, Yamamoto Y, Sakuma A, Nakagawa S, Kawashima R - Cereb. Cortex (2014)

Experimental equipment and task. (a) Virtual mirror system installed in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. A video of the subject's face was shot via a half-mirror and stored on a personal computer (PC). The real-time, delayed, or prerecorded video from the PC was projected onto a semilucent screen behind the head coil, and the subject viewed it via a mirror. (b) Examples of the visual stimuli and the time courses of the subject's facial action and the visual stimuli under the Real-time, Delayed (500 ms), and Static conditions. Each subject quickly opened his mouth as soon as the prompt (a small circle overlaid on the image) appeared, and then immediately closed it.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4537432&req=5

BHU077F1: Experimental equipment and task. (a) Virtual mirror system installed in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. A video of the subject's face was shot via a half-mirror and stored on a personal computer (PC). The real-time, delayed, or prerecorded video from the PC was projected onto a semilucent screen behind the head coil, and the subject viewed it via a mirror. (b) Examples of the visual stimuli and the time courses of the subject's facial action and the visual stimuli under the Real-time, Delayed (500 ms), and Static conditions. Each subject quickly opened his mouth as soon as the prompt (a small circle overlaid on the image) appeared, and then immediately closed it.
Mentions: The system is schematically illustrated in Figure 1a. Subjects lay on the bed of an MRI scanner with their heads fixed in the MRI head coil using elastic blocks. The head component of a SENSE head spine coil (Philips, Best, the Netherlands) was used as the open-face head coil. A high-speed (250 fps) video camera SVS340CUCP (SVS-VISTEK, Seefeld, Germany) viewed the subject's face via a half-mirror attached to the head coil. The image was projected onto a semilucent screen behind the head coil using an Endeavor Pro4700 (Epson, Suwa, Japan) and a DLA-HD10K LCD projector (JVC, Wayne, NJ, USA). Custom software (Physiotech, Tokyo, Japan) allowed presentation of a quasi-real-time (<60-ms delay), delayed-real-time, or prerecorded video. The subjects viewed the screen via a mirror.Figure 1.

Bottom Line: The effect of the contingency cue was identified in the cuneus.Semantic- or integration-level processes, including amodal self-representation and belief validation, which allow modality-independent self-recognition and the resolution of potential conflicts between perceptual cues, respectively, were identified in distinct regions in the right frontal and insular cortices.The results are supportive of the multicomponent notion of self-recognition and suggest a critical role for contingency detection in the co-emergence of self-recognition and empathy in infants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8575, Japan International Research Institute of Disaster Science, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8575, Japan.

No MeSH data available.