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Reflections of Oneself: Neurocognitive Evidence for Dissociable Forms of Self-Referential Recollection.

Bergström ZM, Vogelsang DA, Benoit RG, Simons JS - Cereb. Cortex (2014)

Bottom Line: The dorsal mPFC was generally activated when participants attempted to retrieve social information about themselves and others, regardless of whether this information concerned the conceptual or agentic self or other.In contrast, a role was discerned for ventral mPFC during conceptual but not agentic self-referential recollection, indicating specific involvement in retrieving memories related to self-concept rather than bodily self.A subsequent recognition test for new items that had been presented during the recollection task found that conceptual and agentic recollection attempts resulted in differential incidental encoding of new information.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK School of Psychology, Keynes College, University of Kent, Canterbury CT2 7NP, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Stimuli examples in the study (left column) and test (right column) phases. In the study phase, a symbol at the top of the screen indicated whether the participant (a “plain” face) or the experimenter (a face resembling the experimenter) should speak the word out loud. A symbol at the bottom of the screen indicated whether participants should judge how well the word reflected themselves (pointing hand) or the US President Obama (the “Obama 2008” campaign logo). In the test phase, a question at the top of the screen indicated to participants whether they should remember who had spoken the word at study (Agentic recollection), remember who the word had been related to at study (Conceptual recollection), or make a nonepisodic Control judgment. Top left: a word spoken by the participant at study (Subject) that they also related to themselves (You). Top right: the same word tested with the Conceptual recollection question. Bottom left: a word spoken by the Experimenter at study that the participant related to Obama. Bottom right: a new word tested with the Agentic recollection question.
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BHU063F1: Stimuli examples in the study (left column) and test (right column) phases. In the study phase, a symbol at the top of the screen indicated whether the participant (a “plain” face) or the experimenter (a face resembling the experimenter) should speak the word out loud. A symbol at the bottom of the screen indicated whether participants should judge how well the word reflected themselves (pointing hand) or the US President Obama (the “Obama 2008” campaign logo). In the test phase, a question at the top of the screen indicated to participants whether they should remember who had spoken the word at study (Agentic recollection), remember who the word had been related to at study (Conceptual recollection), or make a nonepisodic Control judgment. Top left: a word spoken by the participant at study (Subject) that they also related to themselves (You). Top right: the same word tested with the Conceptual recollection question. Bottom left: a word spoken by the Experimenter at study that the participant related to Obama. Bottom right: a new word tested with the Agentic recollection question.

Mentions: A study phase consisted of 8 trials. Each trial began with a 500 ms fixation cross followed by a person-descriptive word that appeared in the center of the screen for 500 ms, after which a cue at the top of the screen appeared for 3000 ms indicating who was to read out the word, either the participant or the experimenter (indicated by a “neutral” or an “experimenter” face symbol respectively, see Fig. 1). Participants spoke the word out loud on Subject trials and listened to the experimenter speaking the word over the intercom in Experimenter trials. Subsequently, a second cue appeared at the bottom of the screen for another 3000 ms indicating whether the participant had to judge the extent to which the person-descriptive word applied to either him/herself or to Obama (indicated by a “pointing hand” or an “Obama 2008” symbol respectively, see Fig. 1). Participants made their judgment via 4 buttons with their right hand (“sure no”, “unsure no”, “unsure yes”, and “sure yes”). These 2 study phase factors were fully crossed, and 2 trials of each possible combination were presented in a pseudorandom order (not more than 3 repetitions of the same condition) in each study phase.Figure 1.


Reflections of Oneself: Neurocognitive Evidence for Dissociable Forms of Self-Referential Recollection.

Bergström ZM, Vogelsang DA, Benoit RG, Simons JS - Cereb. Cortex (2014)

Stimuli examples in the study (left column) and test (right column) phases. In the study phase, a symbol at the top of the screen indicated whether the participant (a “plain” face) or the experimenter (a face resembling the experimenter) should speak the word out loud. A symbol at the bottom of the screen indicated whether participants should judge how well the word reflected themselves (pointing hand) or the US President Obama (the “Obama 2008” campaign logo). In the test phase, a question at the top of the screen indicated to participants whether they should remember who had spoken the word at study (Agentic recollection), remember who the word had been related to at study (Conceptual recollection), or make a nonepisodic Control judgment. Top left: a word spoken by the participant at study (Subject) that they also related to themselves (You). Top right: the same word tested with the Conceptual recollection question. Bottom left: a word spoken by the Experimenter at study that the participant related to Obama. Bottom right: a new word tested with the Agentic recollection question.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4537426&req=5

BHU063F1: Stimuli examples in the study (left column) and test (right column) phases. In the study phase, a symbol at the top of the screen indicated whether the participant (a “plain” face) or the experimenter (a face resembling the experimenter) should speak the word out loud. A symbol at the bottom of the screen indicated whether participants should judge how well the word reflected themselves (pointing hand) or the US President Obama (the “Obama 2008” campaign logo). In the test phase, a question at the top of the screen indicated to participants whether they should remember who had spoken the word at study (Agentic recollection), remember who the word had been related to at study (Conceptual recollection), or make a nonepisodic Control judgment. Top left: a word spoken by the participant at study (Subject) that they also related to themselves (You). Top right: the same word tested with the Conceptual recollection question. Bottom left: a word spoken by the Experimenter at study that the participant related to Obama. Bottom right: a new word tested with the Agentic recollection question.
Mentions: A study phase consisted of 8 trials. Each trial began with a 500 ms fixation cross followed by a person-descriptive word that appeared in the center of the screen for 500 ms, after which a cue at the top of the screen appeared for 3000 ms indicating who was to read out the word, either the participant or the experimenter (indicated by a “neutral” or an “experimenter” face symbol respectively, see Fig. 1). Participants spoke the word out loud on Subject trials and listened to the experimenter speaking the word over the intercom in Experimenter trials. Subsequently, a second cue appeared at the bottom of the screen for another 3000 ms indicating whether the participant had to judge the extent to which the person-descriptive word applied to either him/herself or to Obama (indicated by a “pointing hand” or an “Obama 2008” symbol respectively, see Fig. 1). Participants made their judgment via 4 buttons with their right hand (“sure no”, “unsure no”, “unsure yes”, and “sure yes”). These 2 study phase factors were fully crossed, and 2 trials of each possible combination were presented in a pseudorandom order (not more than 3 repetitions of the same condition) in each study phase.Figure 1.

Bottom Line: The dorsal mPFC was generally activated when participants attempted to retrieve social information about themselves and others, regardless of whether this information concerned the conceptual or agentic self or other.In contrast, a role was discerned for ventral mPFC during conceptual but not agentic self-referential recollection, indicating specific involvement in retrieving memories related to self-concept rather than bodily self.A subsequent recognition test for new items that had been presented during the recollection task found that conceptual and agentic recollection attempts resulted in differential incidental encoding of new information.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, UK School of Psychology, Keynes College, University of Kent, Canterbury CT2 7NP, UK.

No MeSH data available.