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Incidence of post-obturation pain after single-visit versus multiple-visit non-surgical endodontic treatments.

Wong AW, Zhang S, Li SK, Zhu X, Zhang C, Chu CH - BMC Oral Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Logistic regression analysis showed that teeth with apical periodontitis (OR = 0.35, 95% CI = 0.21-0.57, p < 0.01) and less pre-operative pain (OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.03-1.18, p < 0.01) had lower incidences of post-obturation pain after one day.The incidences of post-obturation pain after one day for single-visit and multiple-visit treatments were 24.7% (68 of 275) and 33.5% (88 of 263), respectively (p = 0.50).The incidences of post-obturation pain after seven days for single-visit and multiple-visit treatments were 4.0% (11 of 275) and 5.3% (14 of 263), respectively (p = 0.47).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. drawong@hku.hk.

ABSTRACT

Background: Post-obturation pain is frustrating to both patients and dentists. Its incidence may change with the use of contemporary endodontic techniques. This randomised clinical trial aims to compare the incidence of post-obturation pain at one and seven days after single-visit and multiple-visit non-surgical endodontic treatments.

Methods: Patients who required primary endodontic treatment in the two clinical trial centres in Hong Kong (HK) and in Beijing (PK) were recruited. Three HK dentists and three PK dentists performed endodontic treatments on 567 teeth using the same procedures and materials, either in a single visit or over multiple visits, using either core carrier or cold lateral condensation for obturation.

Results: The attrition rate was 5.1%, and a total of 538 teeth were evaluated. Among these teeth, 232 (43%) were operated in HK, 275 (51%) were treated in a single visit, and 234 (43%) were treated using core carrier obturation. Logistic regression analysis showed that teeth with apical periodontitis (OR = 0.35, 95% CI = 0.21-0.57, p < 0.01) and less pre-operative pain (OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.03-1.18, p < 0.01) had lower incidences of post-obturation pain after one day. The incidences of post-obturation pain after one day for single-visit and multiple-visit treatments were 24.7% (68 of 275) and 33.5% (88 of 263), respectively (p = 0.50). The incidences of post-obturation pain after seven days for single-visit and multiple-visit treatments were 4.0% (11 of 275) and 5.3% (14 of 263), respectively (p = 0.47).

Conclusions: There was no significant difference in the incidences of post-obturation pain after one day and seven days with single-visit or multiple-visit endodontic treatments.

Trial registration: ChiCTR-IOR-15005989.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The chart used for the patient’s evaluation of post-obturation pain
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Fig1: The chart used for the patient’s evaluation of post-obturation pain

Mentions: Participants were scheduled for endodontic treatment. The preoperative clinical signs were recorded, including the presence of apical periodontitis (via the presence of apical radiolucency in the radiograph), chronic apical abscesses with or without the sinus tract, tooth mobility (MII, i.e., 1 mm horizontal mobility or above), tenderness to percussion, pockets, and preoperative pain. The pain assessment was adapted from our previous study [12], which measured pain on a 10-point Likert scale, ranging from no pain (score 0) to extreme pain (score 10), as shown in Fig. 1. Patients were reviewed one week after the obturation of the root canals, during which the presence of the clinical signs mentioned above were assessed and recorded. They were also asked about their 1-day and 7-day post-obturation pain, using assessment scale mentioned above (Fig. 1). Figure 2 is the study’s flow chart.Fig. 1


Incidence of post-obturation pain after single-visit versus multiple-visit non-surgical endodontic treatments.

Wong AW, Zhang S, Li SK, Zhu X, Zhang C, Chu CH - BMC Oral Health (2015)

The chart used for the patient’s evaluation of post-obturation pain
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4536791&req=5

Fig1: The chart used for the patient’s evaluation of post-obturation pain
Mentions: Participants were scheduled for endodontic treatment. The preoperative clinical signs were recorded, including the presence of apical periodontitis (via the presence of apical radiolucency in the radiograph), chronic apical abscesses with or without the sinus tract, tooth mobility (MII, i.e., 1 mm horizontal mobility or above), tenderness to percussion, pockets, and preoperative pain. The pain assessment was adapted from our previous study [12], which measured pain on a 10-point Likert scale, ranging from no pain (score 0) to extreme pain (score 10), as shown in Fig. 1. Patients were reviewed one week after the obturation of the root canals, during which the presence of the clinical signs mentioned above were assessed and recorded. They were also asked about their 1-day and 7-day post-obturation pain, using assessment scale mentioned above (Fig. 1). Figure 2 is the study’s flow chart.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Logistic regression analysis showed that teeth with apical periodontitis (OR = 0.35, 95% CI = 0.21-0.57, p < 0.01) and less pre-operative pain (OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.03-1.18, p < 0.01) had lower incidences of post-obturation pain after one day.The incidences of post-obturation pain after one day for single-visit and multiple-visit treatments were 24.7% (68 of 275) and 33.5% (88 of 263), respectively (p = 0.50).The incidences of post-obturation pain after seven days for single-visit and multiple-visit treatments were 4.0% (11 of 275) and 5.3% (14 of 263), respectively (p = 0.47).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. drawong@hku.hk.

ABSTRACT

Background: Post-obturation pain is frustrating to both patients and dentists. Its incidence may change with the use of contemporary endodontic techniques. This randomised clinical trial aims to compare the incidence of post-obturation pain at one and seven days after single-visit and multiple-visit non-surgical endodontic treatments.

Methods: Patients who required primary endodontic treatment in the two clinical trial centres in Hong Kong (HK) and in Beijing (PK) were recruited. Three HK dentists and three PK dentists performed endodontic treatments on 567 teeth using the same procedures and materials, either in a single visit or over multiple visits, using either core carrier or cold lateral condensation for obturation.

Results: The attrition rate was 5.1%, and a total of 538 teeth were evaluated. Among these teeth, 232 (43%) were operated in HK, 275 (51%) were treated in a single visit, and 234 (43%) were treated using core carrier obturation. Logistic regression analysis showed that teeth with apical periodontitis (OR = 0.35, 95% CI = 0.21-0.57, p < 0.01) and less pre-operative pain (OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.03-1.18, p < 0.01) had lower incidences of post-obturation pain after one day. The incidences of post-obturation pain after one day for single-visit and multiple-visit treatments were 24.7% (68 of 275) and 33.5% (88 of 263), respectively (p = 0.50). The incidences of post-obturation pain after seven days for single-visit and multiple-visit treatments were 4.0% (11 of 275) and 5.3% (14 of 263), respectively (p = 0.47).

Conclusions: There was no significant difference in the incidences of post-obturation pain after one day and seven days with single-visit or multiple-visit endodontic treatments.

Trial registration: ChiCTR-IOR-15005989.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus