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Systematic review of school-based interventions to prevent smoking for girls.

de Kleijn MJ, Farmer MM, Booth M, Motala A, Smith A, Sherman S, Assendelft WJ, Shekelle P - Syst Rev (2015)

Bottom Line: One study in which a school-based intervention was combined with a mass media intervention showed more promising results compared to only school-based prevention, and four studies with girl-specific interventions, that could not be included in the pooled analysis, reported statistically significant benefits for attitudes and intentions about smoking and quit rates.There was no evidence that school-based smoking prevention programs have a significant effect on preventing adolescent girls from smoking.Combining school-based programs with mass media interventions, and developing girl-specific interventions, deserve additional study as potentially more effective interventions compared to school-based-only intervention programs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Gender & Women's Health, Department of Primary and Community Care, Radboud University Medical Center, Postbus 9101, 6500 HB, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. mjjdekleijn@me.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The purpose of this review is to study the effect of school-based interventions on smoking prevention for girls.

Methods: We performed a systematic review of articles published since 1992 on school-based tobacco-control interventions in controlled trials for smoking prevention among children. We searched the databases of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, The Cochrane Databases, CINAHL, Social Science Abstracts, and PsycInfo. Two reviewers independently assessed trials for inclusion and quality and extracted data. A pooled random-effects estimate was estimated of the overall relative risk.

Results: Thirty-seven trials were included, of which 16 trials with 24,210 girls were included in the pooled analysis. The overall pooled effect was a relative risk (RR) of 0.96 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.86-1.08; I (2)=75 %). One study in which a school-based intervention was combined with a mass media intervention showed more promising results compared to only school-based prevention, and four studies with girl-specific interventions, that could not be included in the pooled analysis, reported statistically significant benefits for attitudes and intentions about smoking and quit rates.

Conclusions: There was no evidence that school-based smoking prevention programs have a significant effect on preventing adolescent girls from smoking. Combining school-based programs with mass media interventions, and developing girl-specific interventions, deserve additional study as potentially more effective interventions compared to school-based-only intervention programs.

Systematic review registration: PROSPERO CRD42012002322.

No MeSH data available.


Literature flow
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Fig1: Literature flow

Mentions: We reviewed 4924 titles from the electronic search and an additional 36 titles from occasional reference mining. Of the 4960 titles, 197 studies met the inclusion criteria after a title, abstract, and full article review (see Fig. 1). After further review, 37 controlled trials described in 43 articles were included in our data synthesis [16, 17, 26–60, 64, 70–74]; 26 randomized controlled trials and 11 other controlled trials; including 45 intervention groups and 38 control groups; giving a total of 83 arms, including girls from 20 different countries. Funding sources where all related to local or national governmental financing. Ethnicity was not reported in most articles. Full details of the included studies are shown in the evidence tables (Additional file 2: Table S2, Additional file 3: Table S3, Additional file 4: Table S4).Fig. 1


Systematic review of school-based interventions to prevent smoking for girls.

de Kleijn MJ, Farmer MM, Booth M, Motala A, Smith A, Sherman S, Assendelft WJ, Shekelle P - Syst Rev (2015)

Literature flow
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4536766&req=5

Fig1: Literature flow
Mentions: We reviewed 4924 titles from the electronic search and an additional 36 titles from occasional reference mining. Of the 4960 titles, 197 studies met the inclusion criteria after a title, abstract, and full article review (see Fig. 1). After further review, 37 controlled trials described in 43 articles were included in our data synthesis [16, 17, 26–60, 64, 70–74]; 26 randomized controlled trials and 11 other controlled trials; including 45 intervention groups and 38 control groups; giving a total of 83 arms, including girls from 20 different countries. Funding sources where all related to local or national governmental financing. Ethnicity was not reported in most articles. Full details of the included studies are shown in the evidence tables (Additional file 2: Table S2, Additional file 3: Table S3, Additional file 4: Table S4).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: One study in which a school-based intervention was combined with a mass media intervention showed more promising results compared to only school-based prevention, and four studies with girl-specific interventions, that could not be included in the pooled analysis, reported statistically significant benefits for attitudes and intentions about smoking and quit rates.There was no evidence that school-based smoking prevention programs have a significant effect on preventing adolescent girls from smoking.Combining school-based programs with mass media interventions, and developing girl-specific interventions, deserve additional study as potentially more effective interventions compared to school-based-only intervention programs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Gender & Women's Health, Department of Primary and Community Care, Radboud University Medical Center, Postbus 9101, 6500 HB, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. mjjdekleijn@me.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The purpose of this review is to study the effect of school-based interventions on smoking prevention for girls.

Methods: We performed a systematic review of articles published since 1992 on school-based tobacco-control interventions in controlled trials for smoking prevention among children. We searched the databases of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, The Cochrane Databases, CINAHL, Social Science Abstracts, and PsycInfo. Two reviewers independently assessed trials for inclusion and quality and extracted data. A pooled random-effects estimate was estimated of the overall relative risk.

Results: Thirty-seven trials were included, of which 16 trials with 24,210 girls were included in the pooled analysis. The overall pooled effect was a relative risk (RR) of 0.96 (95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.86-1.08; I (2)=75 %). One study in which a school-based intervention was combined with a mass media intervention showed more promising results compared to only school-based prevention, and four studies with girl-specific interventions, that could not be included in the pooled analysis, reported statistically significant benefits for attitudes and intentions about smoking and quit rates.

Conclusions: There was no evidence that school-based smoking prevention programs have a significant effect on preventing adolescent girls from smoking. Combining school-based programs with mass media interventions, and developing girl-specific interventions, deserve additional study as potentially more effective interventions compared to school-based-only intervention programs.

Systematic review registration: PROSPERO CRD42012002322.

No MeSH data available.