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Relationship of BMI to the incidence of hypertension: a 4 years' cohort study among children in Guangzhou, 2007-2011.

Wang J, Zhu Y, Jing J, Chen Y, Mai J, Wong SH, O'Reilly J, Ma L - BMC Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: The thinness was defined by the international age- and gender-specific cut-off points for BMI for thinness grade 1.This study was approved by The Ethical Committee of School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University.Additionally, the protective effect of thinness on hypertension was observed in boys 0.808 (0.666, 0.981), but not in girls 1.158 (0.966, 1.389).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Maternal and Child Health, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-Sen University, 74 Zhongshan Road 2, Guangzhou, 510080, China. 906796134@qq.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: In China, there has been a dramatic increase in overweight and obesity among children and adolescents in recent decades. However, little longitudinal studies reported BMI in relation to the risk for hypertension among children in China. We examined the longitudinal relations between BMI and hypertension in Chinese schoolchildren via a retrospective cohort study.

Methods: The cohort study was carried out in 7203 children (3821 boys and 3382 girls) in Guangzhou aged 6-8 years, with a continuous 4 years of follow-up. The participants, evaluated by body mass index (BMI), were categorized as thinness, normal weight, overweight, and obesity groups. The age and gender-specific BMI cutoffs newly developed by the Working Group on Obesity in China (WGOC) were used to define overweight and obesity. The thinness was defined by the international age- and gender-specific cut-off points for BMI for thinness grade 1. Hypertension was defined by using percentiles of systolic and diastolic values on the basis of height percentile, age, and gender. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the single or joint effect of BMI on the risk of hypertension. This study was approved by The Ethical Committee of School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University.

Results: During a follow-up of 4 years, a shocking high cumulative incidence of hypertension was found in Chinese overweight (50.1 %) and obesity (70 %) schoolchildren. The incidence of children hypertension were markedly higher among overweight and obesity group than normal weight and thinness group (24.3 %, 18.5 % vs 11.1 %, 7.4 %). Compared with the children in the normal weight group, the adjusted HRs and 95 % CIs of developing hypertension in thinness, overweight, and obesity group were 0.972 (0.851, 1.110), 1.313 (1.179, 1.461), and 1.816 (1.634, 2.081), respectively. Additionally, the protective effect of thinness on hypertension was observed in boys 0.808 (0.666, 0.981), but not in girls 1.158 (0.966, 1.389).

Conclusions: The 4-year longitudinal study indicated that the overweight and obesity can predict the higher risk of hypertension in Chinese children, whereas, the thinness predict the lower risk of hypertension only in boys.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The different BMI groups of studied children during the follow-up perioda,b. a Data in this table figure were given as percentages, displaying the incidence of studied children by follow-up year and BMI groups. b The incidence of boys and girls were calculated among overall population
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Fig1: The different BMI groups of studied children during the follow-up perioda,b. a Data in this table figure were given as percentages, displaying the incidence of studied children by follow-up year and BMI groups. b The incidence of boys and girls were calculated among overall population

Mentions: Figure 1 shows the percentage of boys and girls students with thinness, overweight and obesity during the 4 follow-up years. The overall incidence of thinness, overweight, and obesity among students was 18.6 %, 7.7 % and 6.3 % at the first year in 2007, while it was 12.3 %, 12.4 % and 8.3 % at the final year in 2011. There was a significant decrease for incidence of thinness in both boys and girls that corresponded with increased results during the follow-up years. In contrast, the incidence of overweight and obesity increased significantly with the follow-up years. The boys had a higher incidence of overweight (P < 0.05) and obesity (P < 0.05) than girls in most of the follow-up years.Fig. 1


Relationship of BMI to the incidence of hypertension: a 4 years' cohort study among children in Guangzhou, 2007-2011.

Wang J, Zhu Y, Jing J, Chen Y, Mai J, Wong SH, O'Reilly J, Ma L - BMC Public Health (2015)

The different BMI groups of studied children during the follow-up perioda,b. a Data in this table figure were given as percentages, displaying the incidence of studied children by follow-up year and BMI groups. b The incidence of boys and girls were calculated among overall population
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4536743&req=5

Fig1: The different BMI groups of studied children during the follow-up perioda,b. a Data in this table figure were given as percentages, displaying the incidence of studied children by follow-up year and BMI groups. b The incidence of boys and girls were calculated among overall population
Mentions: Figure 1 shows the percentage of boys and girls students with thinness, overweight and obesity during the 4 follow-up years. The overall incidence of thinness, overweight, and obesity among students was 18.6 %, 7.7 % and 6.3 % at the first year in 2007, while it was 12.3 %, 12.4 % and 8.3 % at the final year in 2011. There was a significant decrease for incidence of thinness in both boys and girls that corresponded with increased results during the follow-up years. In contrast, the incidence of overweight and obesity increased significantly with the follow-up years. The boys had a higher incidence of overweight (P < 0.05) and obesity (P < 0.05) than girls in most of the follow-up years.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: The thinness was defined by the international age- and gender-specific cut-off points for BMI for thinness grade 1.This study was approved by The Ethical Committee of School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University.Additionally, the protective effect of thinness on hypertension was observed in boys 0.808 (0.666, 0.981), but not in girls 1.158 (0.966, 1.389).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Maternal and Child Health, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-Sen University, 74 Zhongshan Road 2, Guangzhou, 510080, China. 906796134@qq.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: In China, there has been a dramatic increase in overweight and obesity among children and adolescents in recent decades. However, little longitudinal studies reported BMI in relation to the risk for hypertension among children in China. We examined the longitudinal relations between BMI and hypertension in Chinese schoolchildren via a retrospective cohort study.

Methods: The cohort study was carried out in 7203 children (3821 boys and 3382 girls) in Guangzhou aged 6-8 years, with a continuous 4 years of follow-up. The participants, evaluated by body mass index (BMI), were categorized as thinness, normal weight, overweight, and obesity groups. The age and gender-specific BMI cutoffs newly developed by the Working Group on Obesity in China (WGOC) were used to define overweight and obesity. The thinness was defined by the international age- and gender-specific cut-off points for BMI for thinness grade 1. Hypertension was defined by using percentiles of systolic and diastolic values on the basis of height percentile, age, and gender. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the single or joint effect of BMI on the risk of hypertension. This study was approved by The Ethical Committee of School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University.

Results: During a follow-up of 4 years, a shocking high cumulative incidence of hypertension was found in Chinese overweight (50.1 %) and obesity (70 %) schoolchildren. The incidence of children hypertension were markedly higher among overweight and obesity group than normal weight and thinness group (24.3 %, 18.5 % vs 11.1 %, 7.4 %). Compared with the children in the normal weight group, the adjusted HRs and 95 % CIs of developing hypertension in thinness, overweight, and obesity group were 0.972 (0.851, 1.110), 1.313 (1.179, 1.461), and 1.816 (1.634, 2.081), respectively. Additionally, the protective effect of thinness on hypertension was observed in boys 0.808 (0.666, 0.981), but not in girls 1.158 (0.966, 1.389).

Conclusions: The 4-year longitudinal study indicated that the overweight and obesity can predict the higher risk of hypertension in Chinese children, whereas, the thinness predict the lower risk of hypertension only in boys.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus