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Subclinical and clinical hypothyroidism and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a cross-sectional study of a random population sample aged 18 to 65 years.

Ludwig U, Holzner D, Denzer C, Greinert A, Haenle MM, Oeztuerk S, Koenig W, Boehm BO, Mason RA, Kratzer W, Graeter T, EMIL-Stu - BMC Endocr Disord (2015)

Bottom Line: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common disorders of the liver worldwide.After application of exclusion criteria, a total of 1,276 subjects were included in the study collective.The serum thyroxin (TT4) concentration in subjects with hepatic steatosis was reduced (p =0.0004).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine I, Center for Internal Medicine, University Medical Center Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 23, 89081, Ulm, Germany. ulla.ludwig@uniklinik-ulm.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common disorders of the liver worldwide. Recently, a correlation between thyroid dysfunction and NAFLD has been discussed. Objective of the present study was to investigate the association between thyroid dysfunction and hepatic steatosis.

Methods: Data from 2,445 subjects (51.7% females) aged 18 to 65 years participating in a population-based cross-sectional study were assessed based on a standardized questionnaire and documentation of physical, biochemical and ultrasonographic findings. After application of exclusion criteria, a total of 1,276 subjects were included in the study collective. The influence of potential factors on the development of hepatic steatosis was assessed using multivariate logistic regression.

Results: The prevalence of hepatic steatosis in the study collective was 27.4% (n = 349). The serum thyroxin (TT4) concentration in subjects with hepatic steatosis was reduced (p =0.0004). Adjusting for age, or BMI, there was an increased prevalence of hepatic steatosis in subjects with reduced TT4 concentrations (p = 0.0143; p = < .0001).

Conclusions: The findings of the present study confirm an association between both subclinical and clinical hypothyroidism and hepatic steatosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in relation to thyroid function in the present study. The figure plots the thyroid hormone concentrations in their respective quartiles (x-axis) against NAFLD prevalence rates in percent (y-axis). NAFLD prevalence rates show a downward trend with increasing TT4 concentrations. In addition, a positive trend is also seen for NAFLD prevalence rates with increasing TSH levels in the first quartile
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Fig2: Prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in relation to thyroid function in the present study. The figure plots the thyroid hormone concentrations in their respective quartiles (x-axis) against NAFLD prevalence rates in percent (y-axis). NAFLD prevalence rates show a downward trend with increasing TT4 concentrations. In addition, a positive trend is also seen for NAFLD prevalence rates with increasing TSH levels in the first quartile

Mentions: In order to assess the prevalence of NAFLD, the findings for TSH, TT3 and TT4 were broken down into quartiles (Table 1) and the individual subjects analyzed. Fig. 2 displays a downward trend in the prevalence rate of hepatic steatosis with increasing TT4 values. By contrast, except in the first quartile, the prevalence rate for hepatic steatosis showed an upward trend with increasing TSH concentrations.Fig. 2


Subclinical and clinical hypothyroidism and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a cross-sectional study of a random population sample aged 18 to 65 years.

Ludwig U, Holzner D, Denzer C, Greinert A, Haenle MM, Oeztuerk S, Koenig W, Boehm BO, Mason RA, Kratzer W, Graeter T, EMIL-Stu - BMC Endocr Disord (2015)

Prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in relation to thyroid function in the present study. The figure plots the thyroid hormone concentrations in their respective quartiles (x-axis) against NAFLD prevalence rates in percent (y-axis). NAFLD prevalence rates show a downward trend with increasing TT4 concentrations. In addition, a positive trend is also seen for NAFLD prevalence rates with increasing TSH levels in the first quartile
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4536732&req=5

Fig2: Prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in relation to thyroid function in the present study. The figure plots the thyroid hormone concentrations in their respective quartiles (x-axis) against NAFLD prevalence rates in percent (y-axis). NAFLD prevalence rates show a downward trend with increasing TT4 concentrations. In addition, a positive trend is also seen for NAFLD prevalence rates with increasing TSH levels in the first quartile
Mentions: In order to assess the prevalence of NAFLD, the findings for TSH, TT3 and TT4 were broken down into quartiles (Table 1) and the individual subjects analyzed. Fig. 2 displays a downward trend in the prevalence rate of hepatic steatosis with increasing TT4 values. By contrast, except in the first quartile, the prevalence rate for hepatic steatosis showed an upward trend with increasing TSH concentrations.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common disorders of the liver worldwide.After application of exclusion criteria, a total of 1,276 subjects were included in the study collective.The serum thyroxin (TT4) concentration in subjects with hepatic steatosis was reduced (p =0.0004).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine I, Center for Internal Medicine, University Medical Center Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 23, 89081, Ulm, Germany. ulla.ludwig@uniklinik-ulm.de.

ABSTRACT

Background: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common disorders of the liver worldwide. Recently, a correlation between thyroid dysfunction and NAFLD has been discussed. Objective of the present study was to investigate the association between thyroid dysfunction and hepatic steatosis.

Methods: Data from 2,445 subjects (51.7% females) aged 18 to 65 years participating in a population-based cross-sectional study were assessed based on a standardized questionnaire and documentation of physical, biochemical and ultrasonographic findings. After application of exclusion criteria, a total of 1,276 subjects were included in the study collective. The influence of potential factors on the development of hepatic steatosis was assessed using multivariate logistic regression.

Results: The prevalence of hepatic steatosis in the study collective was 27.4% (n = 349). The serum thyroxin (TT4) concentration in subjects with hepatic steatosis was reduced (p =0.0004). Adjusting for age, or BMI, there was an increased prevalence of hepatic steatosis in subjects with reduced TT4 concentrations (p = 0.0143; p = < .0001).

Conclusions: The findings of the present study confirm an association between both subclinical and clinical hypothyroidism and hepatic steatosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus