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Gelfoam embolization or 125I seed implantation may be a more effective treatment than surgical treatment for giant benign sacral neurogenic tumors.

Ma X, Wei S, Yang C, Hua Y, Shen J, Cai Z - World J Surg Oncol (2015)

Bottom Line: Nineteen cases received surgical resection, and five cases received non-surgical treatment.In surgical group, patients with type III sacral tumor had received a combined anterior-posterior approach and patients with type IV were treated with simple anterior approach.Patients in non-surgical group were followed up for 2-8 years.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedics, Tongji University, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, 301 Yanchang Rd, Shanghai, 200072, China. XiaojunMaxjm@163.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The goal of the present study was to assess the effects of computed tomography (CT)-guided iodine-125 (125I) seed implantation or gelatin sponge particle (GSP) embolization on patients with giant benign sacral neurogenic tumors.

Methods: A total of 24 cases with giant sacral neurogenic tumor were performed in a retrospective study between 2000 and 2012. Nineteen cases received surgical resection, and five cases received non-surgical treatment. In surgical group, patients with type III sacral tumor had received a combined anterior-posterior approach and patients with type IV were treated with simple anterior approach. In non-surgical group, CT-guided 125I seed implantation or GSP embolization was applied to occlude vessels. Besides, CT scanning or magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess the size and development of tumors.

Results: Two of the five patients were treated three times with GSP embolization, one had received GSP embolization combined with CT-guided 125I seed implantation, one case did not receive any treatment, and one patient was lost to follow-up. Patients in non-surgical group were followed up for 2-8 years.

Conclusions: Our study suggested that CT-guided 125I seed implantation or GSP embolization treatment is very useful to slow down the development of giant benign sacral neurogenic tumors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of patient C after gelatin sponge particle (GSPs) implantation taken in July 2014
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Fig3: The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of patient C after gelatin sponge particle (GSPs) implantation taken in July 2014

Mentions: Patient C (51 years old, male), whose sacral lump were detected during routine physical examination, was diagnosed as sacral schwannoma with a tumor size of 12 × 9 × 6 cm. Then, the patient had received three treatments of gelfoam embolization in July 2012, April 2013, and January 2014, respectively. With a 2-year follow-up, the tumor (13 × 10 × 6 cm) was slowly aggressive (Fig. 3).Fig. 3


Gelfoam embolization or 125I seed implantation may be a more effective treatment than surgical treatment for giant benign sacral neurogenic tumors.

Ma X, Wei S, Yang C, Hua Y, Shen J, Cai Z - World J Surg Oncol (2015)

The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of patient C after gelatin sponge particle (GSPs) implantation taken in July 2014
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4536730&req=5

Fig3: The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of patient C after gelatin sponge particle (GSPs) implantation taken in July 2014
Mentions: Patient C (51 years old, male), whose sacral lump were detected during routine physical examination, was diagnosed as sacral schwannoma with a tumor size of 12 × 9 × 6 cm. Then, the patient had received three treatments of gelfoam embolization in July 2012, April 2013, and January 2014, respectively. With a 2-year follow-up, the tumor (13 × 10 × 6 cm) was slowly aggressive (Fig. 3).Fig. 3

Bottom Line: Nineteen cases received surgical resection, and five cases received non-surgical treatment.In surgical group, patients with type III sacral tumor had received a combined anterior-posterior approach and patients with type IV were treated with simple anterior approach.Patients in non-surgical group were followed up for 2-8 years.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedics, Tongji University, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, 301 Yanchang Rd, Shanghai, 200072, China. XiaojunMaxjm@163.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The goal of the present study was to assess the effects of computed tomography (CT)-guided iodine-125 (125I) seed implantation or gelatin sponge particle (GSP) embolization on patients with giant benign sacral neurogenic tumors.

Methods: A total of 24 cases with giant sacral neurogenic tumor were performed in a retrospective study between 2000 and 2012. Nineteen cases received surgical resection, and five cases received non-surgical treatment. In surgical group, patients with type III sacral tumor had received a combined anterior-posterior approach and patients with type IV were treated with simple anterior approach. In non-surgical group, CT-guided 125I seed implantation or GSP embolization was applied to occlude vessels. Besides, CT scanning or magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess the size and development of tumors.

Results: Two of the five patients were treated three times with GSP embolization, one had received GSP embolization combined with CT-guided 125I seed implantation, one case did not receive any treatment, and one patient was lost to follow-up. Patients in non-surgical group were followed up for 2-8 years.

Conclusions: Our study suggested that CT-guided 125I seed implantation or GSP embolization treatment is very useful to slow down the development of giant benign sacral neurogenic tumors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus