Limits...
Gelfoam embolization or 125I seed implantation may be a more effective treatment than surgical treatment for giant benign sacral neurogenic tumors.

Ma X, Wei S, Yang C, Hua Y, Shen J, Cai Z - World J Surg Oncol (2015)

Bottom Line: Nineteen cases received surgical resection, and five cases received non-surgical treatment.In surgical group, patients with type III sacral tumor had received a combined anterior-posterior approach and patients with type IV were treated with simple anterior approach.Patients in non-surgical group were followed up for 2-8 years.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedics, Tongji University, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, 301 Yanchang Rd, Shanghai, 200072, China. XiaojunMaxjm@163.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The goal of the present study was to assess the effects of computed tomography (CT)-guided iodine-125 (125I) seed implantation or gelatin sponge particle (GSP) embolization on patients with giant benign sacral neurogenic tumors.

Methods: A total of 24 cases with giant sacral neurogenic tumor were performed in a retrospective study between 2000 and 2012. Nineteen cases received surgical resection, and five cases received non-surgical treatment. In surgical group, patients with type III sacral tumor had received a combined anterior-posterior approach and patients with type IV were treated with simple anterior approach. In non-surgical group, CT-guided 125I seed implantation or GSP embolization was applied to occlude vessels. Besides, CT scanning or magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess the size and development of tumors.

Results: Two of the five patients were treated three times with GSP embolization, one had received GSP embolization combined with CT-guided 125I seed implantation, one case did not receive any treatment, and one patient was lost to follow-up. Patients in non-surgical group were followed up for 2-8 years.

Conclusions: Our study suggested that CT-guided 125I seed implantation or GSP embolization treatment is very useful to slow down the development of giant benign sacral neurogenic tumors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The X-ray films and computerized tomography (CT) scans of patient A before and after gelatin sponge particles (GSPs) combined with CT-guided 125I seed (n = 30) implantation treatment. a X-ray film of the pelvis taken in March 2005; b pelvic angiography showing the giant tumors before sacral in March 2005; c, d the CT scan taken in March 2005; e X-ray film of the pelvis taken in May 2009 after gelatin sponge particles combined with CT-guided 125I seed (n = 30) implantation; f the CT scan taken in October 2010; g the CT scan taken in September 2011
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4536730&req=5

Fig1: The X-ray films and computerized tomography (CT) scans of patient A before and after gelatin sponge particles (GSPs) combined with CT-guided 125I seed (n = 30) implantation treatment. a X-ray film of the pelvis taken in March 2005; b pelvic angiography showing the giant tumors before sacral in March 2005; c, d the CT scan taken in March 2005; e X-ray film of the pelvis taken in May 2009 after gelatin sponge particles combined with CT-guided 125I seed (n = 30) implantation; f the CT scan taken in October 2010; g the CT scan taken in September 2011

Mentions: Patient A (55 years old, male), with sacrococcygeal pain and numbness in the left leg over an 8-month period, was diagnosed with sacral neurofibroma. The MRI showed that the tumors were circumscribed and exhibited lobulated shape. The primary tumor size was 15 × 14 × 11 cm. The lump was extended to the spinal channel at the S1 nerve root and superior border of coccyx. Meanwhile, the tumor implicated part of the ilium in both sides and pushed the intestinal canal in pelvic (Fig. 1a–d). The surgical operation was canceled because of his sudden cerebral infarction before surgery. So, the patient received GSP embolization and implantation of 125I seeds (n = 30) under CT guidance (Fig. 1e) in May 2009. Five years of follow-up showed that the development of tumor (19 × 18 × 16 cm) was slow-growing with a KPS score of 80 after treatment (Fig. 1f, g).Fig. 1


Gelfoam embolization or 125I seed implantation may be a more effective treatment than surgical treatment for giant benign sacral neurogenic tumors.

Ma X, Wei S, Yang C, Hua Y, Shen J, Cai Z - World J Surg Oncol (2015)

The X-ray films and computerized tomography (CT) scans of patient A before and after gelatin sponge particles (GSPs) combined with CT-guided 125I seed (n = 30) implantation treatment. a X-ray film of the pelvis taken in March 2005; b pelvic angiography showing the giant tumors before sacral in March 2005; c, d the CT scan taken in March 2005; e X-ray film of the pelvis taken in May 2009 after gelatin sponge particles combined with CT-guided 125I seed (n = 30) implantation; f the CT scan taken in October 2010; g the CT scan taken in September 2011
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4536730&req=5

Fig1: The X-ray films and computerized tomography (CT) scans of patient A before and after gelatin sponge particles (GSPs) combined with CT-guided 125I seed (n = 30) implantation treatment. a X-ray film of the pelvis taken in March 2005; b pelvic angiography showing the giant tumors before sacral in March 2005; c, d the CT scan taken in March 2005; e X-ray film of the pelvis taken in May 2009 after gelatin sponge particles combined with CT-guided 125I seed (n = 30) implantation; f the CT scan taken in October 2010; g the CT scan taken in September 2011
Mentions: Patient A (55 years old, male), with sacrococcygeal pain and numbness in the left leg over an 8-month period, was diagnosed with sacral neurofibroma. The MRI showed that the tumors were circumscribed and exhibited lobulated shape. The primary tumor size was 15 × 14 × 11 cm. The lump was extended to the spinal channel at the S1 nerve root and superior border of coccyx. Meanwhile, the tumor implicated part of the ilium in both sides and pushed the intestinal canal in pelvic (Fig. 1a–d). The surgical operation was canceled because of his sudden cerebral infarction before surgery. So, the patient received GSP embolization and implantation of 125I seeds (n = 30) under CT guidance (Fig. 1e) in May 2009. Five years of follow-up showed that the development of tumor (19 × 18 × 16 cm) was slow-growing with a KPS score of 80 after treatment (Fig. 1f, g).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Nineteen cases received surgical resection, and five cases received non-surgical treatment.In surgical group, patients with type III sacral tumor had received a combined anterior-posterior approach and patients with type IV were treated with simple anterior approach.Patients in non-surgical group were followed up for 2-8 years.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedics, Tongji University, Shanghai Tenth People's Hospital, 301 Yanchang Rd, Shanghai, 200072, China. XiaojunMaxjm@163.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The goal of the present study was to assess the effects of computed tomography (CT)-guided iodine-125 (125I) seed implantation or gelatin sponge particle (GSP) embolization on patients with giant benign sacral neurogenic tumors.

Methods: A total of 24 cases with giant sacral neurogenic tumor were performed in a retrospective study between 2000 and 2012. Nineteen cases received surgical resection, and five cases received non-surgical treatment. In surgical group, patients with type III sacral tumor had received a combined anterior-posterior approach and patients with type IV were treated with simple anterior approach. In non-surgical group, CT-guided 125I seed implantation or GSP embolization was applied to occlude vessels. Besides, CT scanning or magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess the size and development of tumors.

Results: Two of the five patients were treated three times with GSP embolization, one had received GSP embolization combined with CT-guided 125I seed implantation, one case did not receive any treatment, and one patient was lost to follow-up. Patients in non-surgical group were followed up for 2-8 years.

Conclusions: Our study suggested that CT-guided 125I seed implantation or GSP embolization treatment is very useful to slow down the development of giant benign sacral neurogenic tumors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus