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Religiosity, spirituality in relation to disordered eating and body image concerns: A systematic review.

Akrawi D, Bartrop R, Potter U, Touyz S - J Eat Disord (2015)

Bottom Line: While the studies reviewed have a number of evident limitations in design and methodology, there is sufficient evidence to make this avenue of enquiry worth pursuing.It is hoped that the direction provided by this review will lead to further investigation into the protective benefits of religiosity and spirituality in the development of a clinical eating disorder.Thus a stronger evidence base can then be utilised in developing community awareness and programs which reduce the risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Campbelltown, NSW Australia.

ABSTRACT

Objective: This systematic review aims to critically examine the existing literature that has reported on the links between aspects of religiosity, spirituality and disordered eating, psychopathology and body image concerns.

Method: A systematic search of online databases (PsycINFO, Medline, Embase and Web of Science) was conducted in December 2014. A search protocol was designed to identify relevant articles that quantitatively explored the relationship between various aspects of religiosity and/or spirituality and disordered eating, psychopathology and/or body image concerns in non-clinical samples of women and men.

Results: Twenty-two studies were identified to have matched the inclusion criteria. Overall, the main findings to emerge were that strong and internalised religious beliefs coupled with having a secure and satisfying relationship with God were associated with lower levels of disordered eating, psychopathology and body image concern. Conversely, a superficial faith coupled with a doubtful and anxious relationship with God were associated with greater levels of disordered eating, psychopathology and body image concern.

Discussion: While the studies reviewed have a number of evident limitations in design and methodology, there is sufficient evidence to make this avenue of enquiry worth pursuing. It is hoped that the direction provided by this review will lead to further investigation into the protective benefits of religiosity and spirituality in the development of a clinical eating disorder. Thus a stronger evidence base can then be utilised in developing community awareness and programs which reduce the risk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow diagram of the article exclusion process
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Fig1: Flow diagram of the article exclusion process

Mentions: 1181 articles were retrieved from searching through the electronic databases. The flow diagram of the article exclusion process is presented in Fig. 1 (Appendix 1). After reviewing the results, it was found that 429 of the articles were duplicates, leaving a total of 752. Screening through the titles of the articles, 615 articles were excluded based on the exclusion criteria. Furthermore, another 92 articles were excluded after abstract screening. This left 45 articles for a full-text screen, following which 23 articles were excluded, culminating in the final 22 articles. At each step of the process, a second reviewer screened through the results to reduce selection bias. A manual search of the reference lists of the final 22 articles was also conducted, however no additional papers were found which matched the inclusion criteria.Fig. 1


Religiosity, spirituality in relation to disordered eating and body image concerns: A systematic review.

Akrawi D, Bartrop R, Potter U, Touyz S - J Eat Disord (2015)

Flow diagram of the article exclusion process
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4536728&req=5

Fig1: Flow diagram of the article exclusion process
Mentions: 1181 articles were retrieved from searching through the electronic databases. The flow diagram of the article exclusion process is presented in Fig. 1 (Appendix 1). After reviewing the results, it was found that 429 of the articles were duplicates, leaving a total of 752. Screening through the titles of the articles, 615 articles were excluded based on the exclusion criteria. Furthermore, another 92 articles were excluded after abstract screening. This left 45 articles for a full-text screen, following which 23 articles were excluded, culminating in the final 22 articles. At each step of the process, a second reviewer screened through the results to reduce selection bias. A manual search of the reference lists of the final 22 articles was also conducted, however no additional papers were found which matched the inclusion criteria.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: While the studies reviewed have a number of evident limitations in design and methodology, there is sufficient evidence to make this avenue of enquiry worth pursuing.It is hoped that the direction provided by this review will lead to further investigation into the protective benefits of religiosity and spirituality in the development of a clinical eating disorder.Thus a stronger evidence base can then be utilised in developing community awareness and programs which reduce the risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Campbelltown, NSW Australia.

ABSTRACT

Objective: This systematic review aims to critically examine the existing literature that has reported on the links between aspects of religiosity, spirituality and disordered eating, psychopathology and body image concerns.

Method: A systematic search of online databases (PsycINFO, Medline, Embase and Web of Science) was conducted in December 2014. A search protocol was designed to identify relevant articles that quantitatively explored the relationship between various aspects of religiosity and/or spirituality and disordered eating, psychopathology and/or body image concerns in non-clinical samples of women and men.

Results: Twenty-two studies were identified to have matched the inclusion criteria. Overall, the main findings to emerge were that strong and internalised religious beliefs coupled with having a secure and satisfying relationship with God were associated with lower levels of disordered eating, psychopathology and body image concern. Conversely, a superficial faith coupled with a doubtful and anxious relationship with God were associated with greater levels of disordered eating, psychopathology and body image concern.

Discussion: While the studies reviewed have a number of evident limitations in design and methodology, there is sufficient evidence to make this avenue of enquiry worth pursuing. It is hoped that the direction provided by this review will lead to further investigation into the protective benefits of religiosity and spirituality in the development of a clinical eating disorder. Thus a stronger evidence base can then be utilised in developing community awareness and programs which reduce the risk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus