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The effects of diet and exercise in the treatment of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus.

Huh KB, Park HS, Kim HM, Lim SK, Kim KR, Lee HC - Korean J. Intern. Med. (1986)

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ABSTRACT

Diet and exercise could be an essential part of the treatment of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). The effects of a strict dietary restriction (800–1,200 Kcal/day) with exercise (2-hour walk per day) on glycemic control were evaluatedin NIDDM patients. A short-term study was performed on 147 cases In these cases, the duration of hospitalization was 7–14 days. We achieved glycemic control [fasting blood sugar (FBS) less than 140 mg/dl] in 112 cases (76%). Among them, 78 (53%) were controlled with diet and exercise only and in 34 (23%), control was induced with oral gliquidone treatment for about 5 days A long-term study was done on 76 cases who followed our program for from 1 to 12 months (mean : 3.8 months) after discharge. Glycemic control was maintained in 56 (74%) in spite of the insignificance of the amount of weight reduction. Glycemic control was significantly related to the duration of diabetes, diabetic complications and the peak C-peptide level, but was unrelated to the initial body weight, FBS levels and HbA1c levels. These data indicate that a program of diet and exercise must be an integral part in the treatment of NIDDM. This was true, especially, for patients who have had adequate insulin secretory capacity few diabetic complications, short duration of disease, and no previous history of oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin therapy.

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Therapeutic approach of NIDDM patients.
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f1-kjim-1-2-198-11: Therapeutic approach of NIDDM patients.

Mentions: All of the subjects were placed on a restricted diet with vitamin supplements and were advised to exercise. According to their body weight, the caloric intake, adjusted to 800–1,200Kcal/day, was 50% carbohydrate (CHO), 30% tat and 20% protein. The exercise schedule consisted of walking for more than 2 hours a day. Fasting blood sugar (FBS) and body weight were monitored every morning. FBS under 140mg% was decided upon as signtying that the disease was being under control. The subjects whose FBS indicated control were defined as a success group, and the others which were brought under control with oral hypoglycemic agents (gliquidone) became members of the group after 5 days of treatment. The subjects who were given hypoglycemic agents were subdivided into an induction group and a failure group, according to their FBS levels. The subjects of the success group and the induction group were together considered to be the short-term success group. They were encouraged to exercise and stay on a strict diet after discharge. Among the subjects followed for more than 1 month (range: 1–12 months, mean 3.8 months), the long-term success group was separated from the long-term failure group by their FBS levels (Fig. 1).


The effects of diet and exercise in the treatment of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus.

Huh KB, Park HS, Kim HM, Lim SK, Kim KR, Lee HC - Korean J. Intern. Med. (1986)

Therapeutic approach of NIDDM patients.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4536712&req=5

f1-kjim-1-2-198-11: Therapeutic approach of NIDDM patients.
Mentions: All of the subjects were placed on a restricted diet with vitamin supplements and were advised to exercise. According to their body weight, the caloric intake, adjusted to 800–1,200Kcal/day, was 50% carbohydrate (CHO), 30% tat and 20% protein. The exercise schedule consisted of walking for more than 2 hours a day. Fasting blood sugar (FBS) and body weight were monitored every morning. FBS under 140mg% was decided upon as signtying that the disease was being under control. The subjects whose FBS indicated control were defined as a success group, and the others which were brought under control with oral hypoglycemic agents (gliquidone) became members of the group after 5 days of treatment. The subjects who were given hypoglycemic agents were subdivided into an induction group and a failure group, according to their FBS levels. The subjects of the success group and the induction group were together considered to be the short-term success group. They were encouraged to exercise and stay on a strict diet after discharge. Among the subjects followed for more than 1 month (range: 1–12 months, mean 3.8 months), the long-term success group was separated from the long-term failure group by their FBS levels (Fig. 1).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Diet and exercise could be an essential part of the treatment of non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). The effects of a strict dietary restriction (800–1,200 Kcal/day) with exercise (2-hour walk per day) on glycemic control were evaluatedin NIDDM patients. A short-term study was performed on 147 cases In these cases, the duration of hospitalization was 7–14 days. We achieved glycemic control [fasting blood sugar (FBS) less than 140 mg/dl] in 112 cases (76%). Among them, 78 (53%) were controlled with diet and exercise only and in 34 (23%), control was induced with oral gliquidone treatment for about 5 days A long-term study was done on 76 cases who followed our program for from 1 to 12 months (mean : 3.8 months) after discharge. Glycemic control was maintained in 56 (74%) in spite of the insignificance of the amount of weight reduction. Glycemic control was significantly related to the duration of diabetes, diabetic complications and the peak C-peptide level, but was unrelated to the initial body weight, FBS levels and HbA1c levels. These data indicate that a program of diet and exercise must be an integral part in the treatment of NIDDM. This was true, especially, for patients who have had adequate insulin secretory capacity few diabetic complications, short duration of disease, and no previous history of oral hypoglycemic agents or insulin therapy.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus