Limits...
Transmitting information of an object behind the obstacle to infinity.

Xu BB, Jiang WX, Meng LL, Cui TJ - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: We propose an illusion device that transforms a metallic cylinder into a Luneburg lens by using transformation optics.In order to realize the required-anisotropic parameters with high permittivity and low permeability, we design embedded split-ring resonators (SRRs) to increase the permittivity of the traditional SRR structures.In experiments, we fabricate and measure the transformed lens, and the tested results agree well with the numerical simulations and theoretical predictions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Millimeter Waves, Department of Radio Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096, China.

ABSTRACT
We propose an illusion device that transforms a metallic cylinder into a Luneburg lens by using transformation optics. Such a transformed focusing lens guides electromagnetic waves to propagate around the central metallic cylinder smoothly and be focused on one spot, and thus the information of an object behind the obstacle can be transmitted to infinity. In order to realize the required-anisotropic parameters with high permittivity and low permeability, we design embedded split-ring resonators (SRRs) to increase the permittivity of the traditional SRR structures. In experiments, we fabricate and measure the transformed lens, and the tested results agree well with the numerical simulations and theoretical predictions. The proposed transformation lens can mimic some properties of Einstein gravitational lens because their wave propagation behaviors are very similar.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The simulated and measured real parts and amplitudes of electric fields.(a) The simulated real parts of electric fields with practical parameters. (b) The simulated amplitudes of electric fields with practical parameters. (c,e,g) The measured real parts of electric fields at 10 GHz, 9.9 GHz and 9.8 GHz, respectively. (d,f,h) The measured amplitudes of electric fields at 10 GHz, 9.9 GHz and 9.8 GHz, respectively.
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f6: The simulated and measured real parts and amplitudes of electric fields.(a) The simulated real parts of electric fields with practical parameters. (b) The simulated amplitudes of electric fields with practical parameters. (c,e,g) The measured real parts of electric fields at 10 GHz, 9.9 GHz and 9.8 GHz, respectively. (d,f,h) The measured amplitudes of electric fields at 10 GHz, 9.9 GHz and 9.8 GHz, respectively.

Mentions: Experiments are carried out to verify the implemented physical lens in our 2D mapper. Different from Fig. 4, another set of numerical simulations have been done with a narrow-width incident plane wave working at 10 GHz. The real part of electric field in the simulation is shown in Fig. 6(a), in which the practical retrieved parameters in each layer are considered. The outer and inner circles are the interfaces of the transformed lens. We can observe that the waves propagate around the center metallic cylinder and then focus on one spot. To observe the focusing effect more clearly, we also plot the amplitude distributions of electric field in Fig. 6(b). The field strength is obviously enhanced after propagating through the transformed lens and the focusing performance is validated. The measured real part of E-field of fabricated sample at 10 GHz is illustrated in Fig. 6(c), in which one focusing spot is observed near the transformed lens. The corresponding measured amplitude distributions of electric field are given in Fig. 6(d) and good focusing property is achieved. Figure 6(e,h) show the measurements of E-field distributions at 9.9 GHz and 9.8 GHz.


Transmitting information of an object behind the obstacle to infinity.

Xu BB, Jiang WX, Meng LL, Cui TJ - Sci Rep (2015)

The simulated and measured real parts and amplitudes of electric fields.(a) The simulated real parts of electric fields with practical parameters. (b) The simulated amplitudes of electric fields with practical parameters. (c,e,g) The measured real parts of electric fields at 10 GHz, 9.9 GHz and 9.8 GHz, respectively. (d,f,h) The measured amplitudes of electric fields at 10 GHz, 9.9 GHz and 9.8 GHz, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4536636&req=5

f6: The simulated and measured real parts and amplitudes of electric fields.(a) The simulated real parts of electric fields with practical parameters. (b) The simulated amplitudes of electric fields with practical parameters. (c,e,g) The measured real parts of electric fields at 10 GHz, 9.9 GHz and 9.8 GHz, respectively. (d,f,h) The measured amplitudes of electric fields at 10 GHz, 9.9 GHz and 9.8 GHz, respectively.
Mentions: Experiments are carried out to verify the implemented physical lens in our 2D mapper. Different from Fig. 4, another set of numerical simulations have been done with a narrow-width incident plane wave working at 10 GHz. The real part of electric field in the simulation is shown in Fig. 6(a), in which the practical retrieved parameters in each layer are considered. The outer and inner circles are the interfaces of the transformed lens. We can observe that the waves propagate around the center metallic cylinder and then focus on one spot. To observe the focusing effect more clearly, we also plot the amplitude distributions of electric field in Fig. 6(b). The field strength is obviously enhanced after propagating through the transformed lens and the focusing performance is validated. The measured real part of E-field of fabricated sample at 10 GHz is illustrated in Fig. 6(c), in which one focusing spot is observed near the transformed lens. The corresponding measured amplitude distributions of electric field are given in Fig. 6(d) and good focusing property is achieved. Figure 6(e,h) show the measurements of E-field distributions at 9.9 GHz and 9.8 GHz.

Bottom Line: We propose an illusion device that transforms a metallic cylinder into a Luneburg lens by using transformation optics.In order to realize the required-anisotropic parameters with high permittivity and low permeability, we design embedded split-ring resonators (SRRs) to increase the permittivity of the traditional SRR structures.In experiments, we fabricate and measure the transformed lens, and the tested results agree well with the numerical simulations and theoretical predictions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Millimeter Waves, Department of Radio Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096, China.

ABSTRACT
We propose an illusion device that transforms a metallic cylinder into a Luneburg lens by using transformation optics. Such a transformed focusing lens guides electromagnetic waves to propagate around the central metallic cylinder smoothly and be focused on one spot, and thus the information of an object behind the obstacle can be transmitted to infinity. In order to realize the required-anisotropic parameters with high permittivity and low permeability, we design embedded split-ring resonators (SRRs) to increase the permittivity of the traditional SRR structures. In experiments, we fabricate and measure the transformed lens, and the tested results agree well with the numerical simulations and theoretical predictions. The proposed transformation lens can mimic some properties of Einstein gravitational lens because their wave propagation behaviors are very similar.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus