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A qualitative study assessing cardiovascular risk factors: the accumulative stressors influencing societal integration of teenage African immigrants.

Zlotnick C, Goldblatt H, Shadmi E, Birenbaum-Carmeli D, Taychaw O - BMC Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Youth of Ethiopian descent engaged in the same western diets, computerized social networking, and habits in smoking and alcohol use as did youth from the dominant society.However, informants of Ethiopian descent encountered and witnessed racism, institutional discrimination and evidence of devaluing Ethiopian culture, influencing youths' ability to integrate into the society.The accumulative impact of these factors contributes to the marginalization of youth of Ethiopian descent in the dominant society and perpetuates a cycle of increasing cardiovascular risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cheryl Spencer Department of Nursing, University of Haifa, 199 Abba Khushi Avenue Mt Carmel, Haifa, Israel. czlotnick@univ.haifa.ac.il.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study examines the nature of disparities in cardiovascular risk by exploring chronic stressors and other cardiovascular risk factors on youth of African descent who are integrating into an industrialized society.

Methods: Qualitative data on cardiovascular risk and acclimation to the dominant society were collected from three groups of key informants: (1) community leaders; (2) youth; and (3) a community advisory group.

Results: Youth of Ethiopian descent engaged in the same western diets, computerized social networking, and habits in smoking and alcohol use as did youth from the dominant society. However, informants of Ethiopian descent encountered and witnessed racism, institutional discrimination and evidence of devaluing Ethiopian culture, influencing youths' ability to integrate into the society.

Conclusion: Immigrant youth of Ethiopian descent face an accumulation of conflicting social support, psychosocial factors, and stressors, including: living in low-income, high-crime areas; encountering pervasive discrimination; acclimating to a new and industrialized culture; and navigating within an often unhospitable society. Contributing to these factors are changes in health behaviors such as adding processed foods and sugary drinks to the diet, increasing heavy alcohol use and substituting screen use for physical activity. The accumulative impact of these factors contributes to the marginalization of youth of Ethiopian descent in the dominant society and perpetuates a cycle of increasing cardiovascular risk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cardiovascular risk factors and cultural acquisition strategies for immigrant youth of African descent
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Fig1: Cardiovascular risk factors and cultural acquisition strategies for immigrant youth of African descent

Mentions: Findings suggest that their acclimation to the dominant Israeli society may be associated with the four cardiovascular risk factors found in the proximate component of the HEP model (i.e., health behaviors; social support; stressors; and characteristics or psychosocial factors), and influenced by the two types of cultural acquisition common among immigrants with different physical characteristics (i.e., marginalization and acculturation) (See Fig. 1). Resilient youth, those who were hopeful and envisioned a positive future despite the obstacles and stressors [51], demonstrated more characteristics of acculturation. Moreover, the effects of being hopeful propelled them to find work or study as a means of thriving and acculturating into Israeli society. Their ability to cope and the desire to succeed led these youth to make lifestyle choices that initiated a self-perpetuating cycle, which contributed to less stress, better health habits and increased acculturation into Israeli society. Other youth were overwhelmed with the emotions of anger and frustration from discrimination, poverty and the rejection from the dominant society. They were more likely to engage in heavy alcohol consumption drinking and smoking (which has been problematic in Israeli youth [50]), paradoxically believed that adopting these negative behaviors would help them blend in and acculturate to Israeli society. However, such characteristics contribute to marginalization.Fig. 1


A qualitative study assessing cardiovascular risk factors: the accumulative stressors influencing societal integration of teenage African immigrants.

Zlotnick C, Goldblatt H, Shadmi E, Birenbaum-Carmeli D, Taychaw O - BMC Public Health (2015)

Cardiovascular risk factors and cultural acquisition strategies for immigrant youth of African descent
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4536599&req=5

Fig1: Cardiovascular risk factors and cultural acquisition strategies for immigrant youth of African descent
Mentions: Findings suggest that their acclimation to the dominant Israeli society may be associated with the four cardiovascular risk factors found in the proximate component of the HEP model (i.e., health behaviors; social support; stressors; and characteristics or psychosocial factors), and influenced by the two types of cultural acquisition common among immigrants with different physical characteristics (i.e., marginalization and acculturation) (See Fig. 1). Resilient youth, those who were hopeful and envisioned a positive future despite the obstacles and stressors [51], demonstrated more characteristics of acculturation. Moreover, the effects of being hopeful propelled them to find work or study as a means of thriving and acculturating into Israeli society. Their ability to cope and the desire to succeed led these youth to make lifestyle choices that initiated a self-perpetuating cycle, which contributed to less stress, better health habits and increased acculturation into Israeli society. Other youth were overwhelmed with the emotions of anger and frustration from discrimination, poverty and the rejection from the dominant society. They were more likely to engage in heavy alcohol consumption drinking and smoking (which has been problematic in Israeli youth [50]), paradoxically believed that adopting these negative behaviors would help them blend in and acculturate to Israeli society. However, such characteristics contribute to marginalization.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Youth of Ethiopian descent engaged in the same western diets, computerized social networking, and habits in smoking and alcohol use as did youth from the dominant society.However, informants of Ethiopian descent encountered and witnessed racism, institutional discrimination and evidence of devaluing Ethiopian culture, influencing youths' ability to integrate into the society.The accumulative impact of these factors contributes to the marginalization of youth of Ethiopian descent in the dominant society and perpetuates a cycle of increasing cardiovascular risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cheryl Spencer Department of Nursing, University of Haifa, 199 Abba Khushi Avenue Mt Carmel, Haifa, Israel. czlotnick@univ.haifa.ac.il.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study examines the nature of disparities in cardiovascular risk by exploring chronic stressors and other cardiovascular risk factors on youth of African descent who are integrating into an industrialized society.

Methods: Qualitative data on cardiovascular risk and acclimation to the dominant society were collected from three groups of key informants: (1) community leaders; (2) youth; and (3) a community advisory group.

Results: Youth of Ethiopian descent engaged in the same western diets, computerized social networking, and habits in smoking and alcohol use as did youth from the dominant society. However, informants of Ethiopian descent encountered and witnessed racism, institutional discrimination and evidence of devaluing Ethiopian culture, influencing youths' ability to integrate into the society.

Conclusion: Immigrant youth of Ethiopian descent face an accumulation of conflicting social support, psychosocial factors, and stressors, including: living in low-income, high-crime areas; encountering pervasive discrimination; acclimating to a new and industrialized culture; and navigating within an often unhospitable society. Contributing to these factors are changes in health behaviors such as adding processed foods and sugary drinks to the diet, increasing heavy alcohol use and substituting screen use for physical activity. The accumulative impact of these factors contributes to the marginalization of youth of Ethiopian descent in the dominant society and perpetuates a cycle of increasing cardiovascular risk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus