Limits...
Binocular pattern deprivation interferes with the expression of proteins involved in primary visual cortex maturation in the cat.

Laskowska-Macios K, Nys J, Hu TT, Zapasnik M, Van der Perren A, Kossut M, Burnat K, Arckens L - Mol Brain (2015)

Bottom Line: Consistent with the maturation delay, distinct developmental protein expression changes observed for normal kittens were postponed by BD, especially in the peripheral region.Verification of the expression of proteins from each of the biological processes via Western analysis disclosed that some of the transient proteomic changes correlate to the distinct behavioral outcome in adult life, depending on timing and duration of the BD period [Neuroscience 2013;255:99-109].Taken together, the plasticity potential to recover from BD, in relation to ensuing restoration of normal visual input, appears to rely on specific protein expression changes and cellular processes induced by the loss of pattern vision in early life.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Neuroplasticity, Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, 02-093, Warsaw, Poland. karolina.laskowska.macios@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Binocular pattern deprivation from eye opening (early BD) delays the maturation of the primary visual cortex. This delay is more pronounced for the peripheral than the central visual field representation within area 17, particularly between the age of 2 and 4 months [Laskowska-Macios, Cereb Cortex, 2014].

Results: In this study, we probed for related dynamic changes in the cortical proteome. We introduced age, cortical region and BD as principal variables in a 2-D DIGE screen of area 17. In this way we explored the potential of BD-related protein expression changes between central and peripheral area 17 of 2- and 4-month-old BD (2BD, 4BD) kittens as a valid parameter towards the identification of brain maturation-related molecular processes. Consistent with the maturation delay, distinct developmental protein expression changes observed for normal kittens were postponed by BD, especially in the peripheral region. These BD-induced proteomic changes suggest a negative regulation of neurite outgrowth, synaptic transmission and clathrin-mediated endocytosis, thereby implicating these processes in normal experience-induced visual cortex maturation. Verification of the expression of proteins from each of the biological processes via Western analysis disclosed that some of the transient proteomic changes correlate to the distinct behavioral outcome in adult life, depending on timing and duration of the BD period [Neuroscience 2013;255:99-109].

Conclusions: Taken together, the plasticity potential to recover from BD, in relation to ensuing restoration of normal visual input, appears to rely on specific protein expression changes and cellular processes induced by the loss of pattern vision in early life.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

CRMP2 and CRMP4 protein expression analysis. Visualization and analysis of the relevant spots from the 2-D DIGE experiments containing CRMP2 (a) and CRMP4 (c); semi-quantitative Western blotting for CRMP2 (b) and CRMP4 (d). Overall, the CRMP2 expression increased with age and was not different in BD animals as compared to age-matched normal controls. The level of CRMP4 in normal controls decreased towards month 4 and again increased at the age of 6 months, and was higher in all BD animals as compared to age-matched normal controls. Asterisks above bars denote significant differences (P < 0.05) for a given region between age groups of a given condition (normal or BD). Numbers above BD-related bars denote the % statistical difference between BD and age-matched normal control groups (P < 0.05). Results are means with ± SD. Abbreviations: C – central, P – peripheral
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4536594&req=5

Fig3: CRMP2 and CRMP4 protein expression analysis. Visualization and analysis of the relevant spots from the 2-D DIGE experiments containing CRMP2 (a) and CRMP4 (c); semi-quantitative Western blotting for CRMP2 (b) and CRMP4 (d). Overall, the CRMP2 expression increased with age and was not different in BD animals as compared to age-matched normal controls. The level of CRMP4 in normal controls decreased towards month 4 and again increased at the age of 6 months, and was higher in all BD animals as compared to age-matched normal controls. Asterisks above bars denote significant differences (P < 0.05) for a given region between age groups of a given condition (normal or BD). Numbers above BD-related bars denote the % statistical difference between BD and age-matched normal control groups (P < 0.05). Results are means with ± SD. Abbreviations: C – central, P – peripheral

Mentions: 2-D DIGE revealed a diverse effect of age and BD on the different CRMP2 isoforms (Fig. 3a). Some isoforms increase, others decrease with age in normal but not in BD kittens. When probing for the overall CRMP2 expression level by Western analysis low levels were detected in 1N and 2N groups, which increased to the adult level by the age of 4 months (Fig. 3b). This age-dependent increase in CRMP2 expression was also observed in early onset BD animals but lasted longer, until 6 months of age (Fig. 3a, b). Nevertheless, in comparison to age-matched normal controls the total amount of CRMP2 did not differ for either early or late onset BD kittens (Fig. 3a, b).Fig. 3


Binocular pattern deprivation interferes with the expression of proteins involved in primary visual cortex maturation in the cat.

Laskowska-Macios K, Nys J, Hu TT, Zapasnik M, Van der Perren A, Kossut M, Burnat K, Arckens L - Mol Brain (2015)

CRMP2 and CRMP4 protein expression analysis. Visualization and analysis of the relevant spots from the 2-D DIGE experiments containing CRMP2 (a) and CRMP4 (c); semi-quantitative Western blotting for CRMP2 (b) and CRMP4 (d). Overall, the CRMP2 expression increased with age and was not different in BD animals as compared to age-matched normal controls. The level of CRMP4 in normal controls decreased towards month 4 and again increased at the age of 6 months, and was higher in all BD animals as compared to age-matched normal controls. Asterisks above bars denote significant differences (P < 0.05) for a given region between age groups of a given condition (normal or BD). Numbers above BD-related bars denote the % statistical difference between BD and age-matched normal control groups (P < 0.05). Results are means with ± SD. Abbreviations: C – central, P – peripheral
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4536594&req=5

Fig3: CRMP2 and CRMP4 protein expression analysis. Visualization and analysis of the relevant spots from the 2-D DIGE experiments containing CRMP2 (a) and CRMP4 (c); semi-quantitative Western blotting for CRMP2 (b) and CRMP4 (d). Overall, the CRMP2 expression increased with age and was not different in BD animals as compared to age-matched normal controls. The level of CRMP4 in normal controls decreased towards month 4 and again increased at the age of 6 months, and was higher in all BD animals as compared to age-matched normal controls. Asterisks above bars denote significant differences (P < 0.05) for a given region between age groups of a given condition (normal or BD). Numbers above BD-related bars denote the % statistical difference between BD and age-matched normal control groups (P < 0.05). Results are means with ± SD. Abbreviations: C – central, P – peripheral
Mentions: 2-D DIGE revealed a diverse effect of age and BD on the different CRMP2 isoforms (Fig. 3a). Some isoforms increase, others decrease with age in normal but not in BD kittens. When probing for the overall CRMP2 expression level by Western analysis low levels were detected in 1N and 2N groups, which increased to the adult level by the age of 4 months (Fig. 3b). This age-dependent increase in CRMP2 expression was also observed in early onset BD animals but lasted longer, until 6 months of age (Fig. 3a, b). Nevertheless, in comparison to age-matched normal controls the total amount of CRMP2 did not differ for either early or late onset BD kittens (Fig. 3a, b).Fig. 3

Bottom Line: Consistent with the maturation delay, distinct developmental protein expression changes observed for normal kittens were postponed by BD, especially in the peripheral region.Verification of the expression of proteins from each of the biological processes via Western analysis disclosed that some of the transient proteomic changes correlate to the distinct behavioral outcome in adult life, depending on timing and duration of the BD period [Neuroscience 2013;255:99-109].Taken together, the plasticity potential to recover from BD, in relation to ensuing restoration of normal visual input, appears to rely on specific protein expression changes and cellular processes induced by the loss of pattern vision in early life.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Neuroplasticity, Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, 02-093, Warsaw, Poland. karolina.laskowska.macios@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Binocular pattern deprivation from eye opening (early BD) delays the maturation of the primary visual cortex. This delay is more pronounced for the peripheral than the central visual field representation within area 17, particularly between the age of 2 and 4 months [Laskowska-Macios, Cereb Cortex, 2014].

Results: In this study, we probed for related dynamic changes in the cortical proteome. We introduced age, cortical region and BD as principal variables in a 2-D DIGE screen of area 17. In this way we explored the potential of BD-related protein expression changes between central and peripheral area 17 of 2- and 4-month-old BD (2BD, 4BD) kittens as a valid parameter towards the identification of brain maturation-related molecular processes. Consistent with the maturation delay, distinct developmental protein expression changes observed for normal kittens were postponed by BD, especially in the peripheral region. These BD-induced proteomic changes suggest a negative regulation of neurite outgrowth, synaptic transmission and clathrin-mediated endocytosis, thereby implicating these processes in normal experience-induced visual cortex maturation. Verification of the expression of proteins from each of the biological processes via Western analysis disclosed that some of the transient proteomic changes correlate to the distinct behavioral outcome in adult life, depending on timing and duration of the BD period [Neuroscience 2013;255:99-109].

Conclusions: Taken together, the plasticity potential to recover from BD, in relation to ensuing restoration of normal visual input, appears to rely on specific protein expression changes and cellular processes induced by the loss of pattern vision in early life.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus