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Does metal pollution matter with C retention by rice soil?

Bian R, Cheng K, Zheng J, Liu X, Liu Y, Li Z, Li L, Smith P, Pan G, Crowley D, Zheng J, Zhang X, Zhang L, Hussain Q - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Soil respiration, resulting in decomposition of soil organic carbon (SOC), emits CO2 to the atmosphere and increases under climate warming.Here we show significantly increased soil respiration and efflux of both CO2 and CH4 with a concomitant reduction in SOC storage from a metal polluted rice soil in China.The pollution-induced increase in soil respiration and loss of SOC storage will likely counteract efforts to increase SOC sequestration in rice paddies for climate change mitigation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Resource, Ecosystem and Environment of Agriculture, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095-China.

ABSTRACT
Soil respiration, resulting in decomposition of soil organic carbon (SOC), emits CO2 to the atmosphere and increases under climate warming. However, the impact of heavy metal pollution on soil respiration in croplands is not well understood. Here we show significantly increased soil respiration and efflux of both CO2 and CH4 with a concomitant reduction in SOC storage from a metal polluted rice soil in China. This change is linked to a decline in soil aggregation, in microbial abundance and in fungal dominance. The carbon release is presumably driven by changes in carbon cycling occurring in the stressed soil microbial community with heavy metal pollution in the soil. The pollution-induced increase in soil respiration and loss of SOC storage will likely counteract efforts to increase SOC sequestration in rice paddies for climate change mitigation.

No MeSH data available.


Metal induced changes (%) in soil respiration, micro-aggregate size fractions and topsoil organic carbon storage by comparing polluted plots to background plots.All the changes are significant at p < 0.05.
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f1: Metal induced changes (%) in soil respiration, micro-aggregate size fractions and topsoil organic carbon storage by comparing polluted plots to background plots.All the changes are significant at p < 0.05.

Mentions: Soil respiration and CO2 emission rates were variable over the whole crop growing season (WCGS) but were consistent in showing that heavy metal pollution significantly increased respiration rates (Fig. 1). Soil CO2 and CH4 efflux across the WCGS was increased under pollution by 69% and 14% in the rice season, and soil CO2 efflux by 13% in the wheat season, respectively (Fig. 1, Table S1 and S2). There was an increase in soil basal respiration from PF plots compared to BG plots by 46% and 12% (Table S3 and S4), respectively under aerobic and anaerobic incubation for the topsoil samples from the wheat field and rice field during grain heading, and by 4% and 6% (Tabel S5 and S6) under aerobic incubation for the topsoil samples from the wheat field and rice field after harvest.


Does metal pollution matter with C retention by rice soil?

Bian R, Cheng K, Zheng J, Liu X, Liu Y, Li Z, Li L, Smith P, Pan G, Crowley D, Zheng J, Zhang X, Zhang L, Hussain Q - Sci Rep (2015)

Metal induced changes (%) in soil respiration, micro-aggregate size fractions and topsoil organic carbon storage by comparing polluted plots to background plots.All the changes are significant at p < 0.05.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4536517&req=5

f1: Metal induced changes (%) in soil respiration, micro-aggregate size fractions and topsoil organic carbon storage by comparing polluted plots to background plots.All the changes are significant at p < 0.05.
Mentions: Soil respiration and CO2 emission rates were variable over the whole crop growing season (WCGS) but were consistent in showing that heavy metal pollution significantly increased respiration rates (Fig. 1). Soil CO2 and CH4 efflux across the WCGS was increased under pollution by 69% and 14% in the rice season, and soil CO2 efflux by 13% in the wheat season, respectively (Fig. 1, Table S1 and S2). There was an increase in soil basal respiration from PF plots compared to BG plots by 46% and 12% (Table S3 and S4), respectively under aerobic and anaerobic incubation for the topsoil samples from the wheat field and rice field during grain heading, and by 4% and 6% (Tabel S5 and S6) under aerobic incubation for the topsoil samples from the wheat field and rice field after harvest.

Bottom Line: Soil respiration, resulting in decomposition of soil organic carbon (SOC), emits CO2 to the atmosphere and increases under climate warming.Here we show significantly increased soil respiration and efflux of both CO2 and CH4 with a concomitant reduction in SOC storage from a metal polluted rice soil in China.The pollution-induced increase in soil respiration and loss of SOC storage will likely counteract efforts to increase SOC sequestration in rice paddies for climate change mitigation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Resource, Ecosystem and Environment of Agriculture, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095-China.

ABSTRACT
Soil respiration, resulting in decomposition of soil organic carbon (SOC), emits CO2 to the atmosphere and increases under climate warming. However, the impact of heavy metal pollution on soil respiration in croplands is not well understood. Here we show significantly increased soil respiration and efflux of both CO2 and CH4 with a concomitant reduction in SOC storage from a metal polluted rice soil in China. This change is linked to a decline in soil aggregation, in microbial abundance and in fungal dominance. The carbon release is presumably driven by changes in carbon cycling occurring in the stressed soil microbial community with heavy metal pollution in the soil. The pollution-induced increase in soil respiration and loss of SOC storage will likely counteract efforts to increase SOC sequestration in rice paddies for climate change mitigation.

No MeSH data available.