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Noninvasive evaluation of left ventricular diastolic function in patients with angina pectoris--pulsed Doppler echocardiographic technique.

Oh BH, Kim CH, Park YB, Choi YS, Seo JD, Lee YW - Korean J. Intern. Med. (1988)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

To assess the disturbed left ventricular diastolic filling by pulsed Doppler echocardiography in patients with angina pectoris who have normal systolic function, 55 subjects (33 angina patients with, 22 control subjects without significant (⩾75%) coronary artery narrowing) underwent pulsed Doppler echocardiography examination one day before coronary arteriography.

From analysis of the transmitral flow velocity curve, diastolic time intervals, peak early and late atrial flow velocities, the ratio of early to atrial peak flow velocity, and deceleration slope after peak early flow velocity were measured. The angina group had a significantly higher peak atrial flow velocity (50.1 ± 10.0 cm/sec vs. 43.7 ± 9.0, p<0.05) and a lower ratio of early to atrial peak flow velocity (0.91 ± 0.24 vs. 1.17 ± 0.30, p<0.005), but peak early flow velocity, deceleration slope, and diastolic time intervals were similar in both groups. Therefore, the pulsed Doppler technique using the transmitral flow velocity curve is thought to be useful in the noninvasive evaluation of diastolic function even in patients with angina pectoris who have normal systolic function and no left ventricular hypertrophy.

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Peak early flow velocity (PEFV) (left panel), peak atrial flow velocity (PAFV) (middle panel), and ratios of early to atrial peak flow velocity (PEFV/PAFV) (right panel) for control subjects and patients with angina pectoris. Bracketed values represent mean ± standard deviation.
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f2-kjim-3-1-52-8: Peak early flow velocity (PEFV) (left panel), peak atrial flow velocity (PAFV) (middle panel), and ratios of early to atrial peak flow velocity (PEFV/PAFV) (right panel) for control subjects and patients with angina pectoris. Bracketed values represent mean ± standard deviation.

Mentions: Diastolic parameters derived from the transmitral low velocity curve of the two groups were compared (Table 2). In the angina group, peak atrial flow velocity (50.1 ± 10.0 cm/sec) was higher than that of the control group (43.7 ± 9.0 cm/sec) (p<0.05), but there was no significant difference between the peak early flow velocities of both groups. The ratio of early to atrial peak flow velocity in the angina group (0.91 ± 0.24) was lower than that of the control group (1.17 ± 0.30) (p<0.005) (Figure 2). Other parameters including normalized time to peak early or atrial flow velocity and deceleration slope of peak early flow velocity (EF slope) were not significantly different between the two groups.


Noninvasive evaluation of left ventricular diastolic function in patients with angina pectoris--pulsed Doppler echocardiographic technique.

Oh BH, Kim CH, Park YB, Choi YS, Seo JD, Lee YW - Korean J. Intern. Med. (1988)

Peak early flow velocity (PEFV) (left panel), peak atrial flow velocity (PAFV) (middle panel), and ratios of early to atrial peak flow velocity (PEFV/PAFV) (right panel) for control subjects and patients with angina pectoris. Bracketed values represent mean ± standard deviation.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4532133&req=5

f2-kjim-3-1-52-8: Peak early flow velocity (PEFV) (left panel), peak atrial flow velocity (PAFV) (middle panel), and ratios of early to atrial peak flow velocity (PEFV/PAFV) (right panel) for control subjects and patients with angina pectoris. Bracketed values represent mean ± standard deviation.
Mentions: Diastolic parameters derived from the transmitral low velocity curve of the two groups were compared (Table 2). In the angina group, peak atrial flow velocity (50.1 ± 10.0 cm/sec) was higher than that of the control group (43.7 ± 9.0 cm/sec) (p<0.05), but there was no significant difference between the peak early flow velocities of both groups. The ratio of early to atrial peak flow velocity in the angina group (0.91 ± 0.24) was lower than that of the control group (1.17 ± 0.30) (p<0.005) (Figure 2). Other parameters including normalized time to peak early or atrial flow velocity and deceleration slope of peak early flow velocity (EF slope) were not significantly different between the two groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

To assess the disturbed left ventricular diastolic filling by pulsed Doppler echocardiography in patients with angina pectoris who have normal systolic function, 55 subjects (33 angina patients with, 22 control subjects without significant (&#10878;75%) coronary artery narrowing) underwent pulsed Doppler echocardiography examination one day before coronary arteriography.

From analysis of the transmitral flow velocity curve, diastolic time intervals, peak early and late atrial flow velocities, the ratio of early to atrial peak flow velocity, and deceleration slope after peak early flow velocity were measured. The angina group had a significantly higher peak atrial flow velocity (50.1 &plusmn; 10.0 cm/sec vs. 43.7 &plusmn; 9.0, p&lt;0.05) and a lower ratio of early to atrial peak flow velocity (0.91 &plusmn; 0.24 vs. 1.17 &plusmn; 0.30, p&lt;0.005), but peak early flow velocity, deceleration slope, and diastolic time intervals were similar in both groups. Therefore, the pulsed Doppler technique using the transmitral flow velocity curve is thought to be useful in the noninvasive evaluation of diastolic function even in patients with angina pectoris who have normal systolic function and no left ventricular hypertrophy.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus