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Serum and urine soluble HLA class I antigen concentrations are increased in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome.

Park CW, Yun SN, Yang CW, Kim TG, Han H, Choi EJ, Chang YS, Bang BK - Korean J. Intern. Med. (1997)

Bottom Line: Serum sHLA-l concentrations in patients with hypotensive episode were higher than in those without the episode (5,85 +/-2,184 vs. 2,389 +/- 860 ng/ml in oliguric phase, 4.11 +/- 1,952 vs. 1,502 +/- 592 ng/ml in diuretic phase, p < 0.05), and serum sHLA-l levels showed a significant correlation with blood WBC count (r = 0.75 in the febrile and hypotensive phase, p < 0.01) and serum creatinine concentrations (r = 0.64 in the oliguric phase, p < 0.01), respectively, Urine sHLA-I levels in the oliguric phase were significantly higher than those in the diuretic phase (390 +/- 155 vs. 214 +/- 45 ng/mg Cr, p < 0.05) and urine sHLA-I levels are associated with severe illness in patients with HFRS.The higher serum sHLA-I are associated with severe illness in patients with HFRS.The persistent elevation of serum sHLA-I during all phases of HFRS might be related to increased production due to prolonged cellular immunologic stimulation by the Hantaan virus rather than decreased excretion of sHLA-I through the kidney.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Catholic University Medical College, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: In order to evaluate the association between the Hantaan virus-induced cellular-immune response and clinical severity in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS).

Methods: We serially measured the serum (n = 16) and urine (n = 6) concentrations of soluble HLA class 1 antigen (sHLA-l) and clinical powameters in patients with HFRS.

Results: Serum sHLA-I concentrations in patients with HFRS were significantly higher than those in controls throughout all clinical phases (p < 0.01). The highly elevated Serum sHLA-I concentrations peaked in the oliguric phase and declined gradually through the phases of HFRS. Serum sHLA-l concentrations in patients with hypotensive episode were higher than in those without the episode (5,85 +/-2,184 vs. 2,389 +/- 860 ng/ml in oliguric phase, 4.11 +/- 1,952 vs. 1,502 +/- 592 ng/ml in diuretic phase, p < 0.05), and serum sHLA-l levels showed a significant correlation with blood WBC count (r = 0.75 in the febrile and hypotensive phase, p < 0.01) and serum creatinine concentrations (r = 0.64 in the oliguric phase, p < 0.01), respectively, Urine sHLA-I levels in the oliguric phase were significantly higher than those in the diuretic phase (390 +/- 155 vs. 214 +/- 45 ng/mg Cr, p < 0.05) and urine sHLA-I levels are associated with severe illness in patients with HFRS. The higher serum sHLA-I are associated with severe illness in patients with HFRS. The persistent elevation of serum sHLA-I during all phases of HFRS might be related to increased production due to prolonged cellular immunologic stimulation by the Hantaan virus rather than decreased excretion of sHLA-I through the kidney.

Conclusion: We suggest that the serum and urine sHLA-I concentrations can be used as a stable and objective parameter for monitoring clinical severity and renal dysfunction in patients with HFRS.

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Correlation between serum creatinine and serum sHLA-I concentrations in the oliguric phase with HFRS patients.
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f5-kjim-12-1-52-9: Correlation between serum creatinine and serum sHLA-I concentrations in the oliguric phase with HFRS patients.

Mentions: Blood WBC counts correlated highly with serum sHLA-I concentrations through the febrile to hypotensive phase (r=0.75, p<0.01, Fig. 5), but there were no correlations between the WBC counts and the serum sHLA- I concentrations in other phases (in the diuretic and convalescent phase, r=0.03, 0.08, respectively). The creatinine levels correlated sensitively with serum sHLA-I concentrations in the oliguric phase (r=0.64, p< 0.01, Fig. 6), but there was no relation to serum sHLA-I concentrations in other phases. The platelet counts did not correlate with serum sHLA- I concentrations throughout all disease phases.


Serum and urine soluble HLA class I antigen concentrations are increased in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome.

Park CW, Yun SN, Yang CW, Kim TG, Han H, Choi EJ, Chang YS, Bang BK - Korean J. Intern. Med. (1997)

Correlation between serum creatinine and serum sHLA-I concentrations in the oliguric phase with HFRS patients.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4531974&req=5

f5-kjim-12-1-52-9: Correlation between serum creatinine and serum sHLA-I concentrations in the oliguric phase with HFRS patients.
Mentions: Blood WBC counts correlated highly with serum sHLA-I concentrations through the febrile to hypotensive phase (r=0.75, p<0.01, Fig. 5), but there were no correlations between the WBC counts and the serum sHLA- I concentrations in other phases (in the diuretic and convalescent phase, r=0.03, 0.08, respectively). The creatinine levels correlated sensitively with serum sHLA-I concentrations in the oliguric phase (r=0.64, p< 0.01, Fig. 6), but there was no relation to serum sHLA-I concentrations in other phases. The platelet counts did not correlate with serum sHLA- I concentrations throughout all disease phases.

Bottom Line: Serum sHLA-l concentrations in patients with hypotensive episode were higher than in those without the episode (5,85 +/-2,184 vs. 2,389 +/- 860 ng/ml in oliguric phase, 4.11 +/- 1,952 vs. 1,502 +/- 592 ng/ml in diuretic phase, p < 0.05), and serum sHLA-l levels showed a significant correlation with blood WBC count (r = 0.75 in the febrile and hypotensive phase, p < 0.01) and serum creatinine concentrations (r = 0.64 in the oliguric phase, p < 0.01), respectively, Urine sHLA-I levels in the oliguric phase were significantly higher than those in the diuretic phase (390 +/- 155 vs. 214 +/- 45 ng/mg Cr, p < 0.05) and urine sHLA-I levels are associated with severe illness in patients with HFRS.The higher serum sHLA-I are associated with severe illness in patients with HFRS.The persistent elevation of serum sHLA-I during all phases of HFRS might be related to increased production due to prolonged cellular immunologic stimulation by the Hantaan virus rather than decreased excretion of sHLA-I through the kidney.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Catholic University Medical College, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: In order to evaluate the association between the Hantaan virus-induced cellular-immune response and clinical severity in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS).

Methods: We serially measured the serum (n = 16) and urine (n = 6) concentrations of soluble HLA class 1 antigen (sHLA-l) and clinical powameters in patients with HFRS.

Results: Serum sHLA-I concentrations in patients with HFRS were significantly higher than those in controls throughout all clinical phases (p < 0.01). The highly elevated Serum sHLA-I concentrations peaked in the oliguric phase and declined gradually through the phases of HFRS. Serum sHLA-l concentrations in patients with hypotensive episode were higher than in those without the episode (5,85 +/-2,184 vs. 2,389 +/- 860 ng/ml in oliguric phase, 4.11 +/- 1,952 vs. 1,502 +/- 592 ng/ml in diuretic phase, p < 0.05), and serum sHLA-l levels showed a significant correlation with blood WBC count (r = 0.75 in the febrile and hypotensive phase, p < 0.01) and serum creatinine concentrations (r = 0.64 in the oliguric phase, p < 0.01), respectively, Urine sHLA-I levels in the oliguric phase were significantly higher than those in the diuretic phase (390 +/- 155 vs. 214 +/- 45 ng/mg Cr, p < 0.05) and urine sHLA-I levels are associated with severe illness in patients with HFRS. The higher serum sHLA-I are associated with severe illness in patients with HFRS. The persistent elevation of serum sHLA-I during all phases of HFRS might be related to increased production due to prolonged cellular immunologic stimulation by the Hantaan virus rather than decreased excretion of sHLA-I through the kidney.

Conclusion: We suggest that the serum and urine sHLA-I concentrations can be used as a stable and objective parameter for monitoring clinical severity and renal dysfunction in patients with HFRS.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus