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The Gut Microbiota of Wild Mice.

Weldon L, Abolins S, Lenzi L, Bourne C, Riley EM, Viney M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The gut microbiota profoundly affects the biology of its host.The composition of the microbiota is dynamic and is affected by both host genetic and many environmental effects.In this study we have characterised the gut (both the caecum and rectum) microbiota of wild caught Mus musculus domesticus at three UK sites and have investigated how the microbiota varies depending on host location and host characteristics.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
The gut microbiota profoundly affects the biology of its host. The composition of the microbiota is dynamic and is affected by both host genetic and many environmental effects. The gut microbiota of laboratory mice has been studied extensively, which has uncovered many of the effects that the microbiota can have. This work has also shown that the environments of different research institutions can affect the mouse microbiota. There has been relatively limited study of the microbiota of wild mice, but this has shown that it typically differs from that of laboratory mice (and that maintaining wild caught mice in the laboratory can quite quickly alter the microbiota). There is also inter-individual variation in the microbiota of wild mice, with this principally explained by geographical location. In this study we have characterised the gut (both the caecum and rectum) microbiota of wild caught Mus musculus domesticus at three UK sites and have investigated how the microbiota varies depending on host location and host characteristics. We find that the microbiota of these mice are generally consistent with those described from other wild mice. The rectal and caecal microbiotas of individual mice are generally more similar to each other, than they are to the microbiota of other individuals. We found significant differences in the diversity of the microbiotas among mice from different sample sites. There were significant correlations of microbiota diversity and body weight, a measure of age, body-mass index, serum concentration of leptin, and virus, nematode and mite infection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Bray-Curtis dissimilarity.A dendrogram showing the dissimilarity among the 39 samples from 14 mice, based on the Bray-Curtis measure of dissimilarity (range 0–1), with samples colour-coded as blue HW, green WF, and red for LU; C and R are caecal and rectal samples, respectively, all as Table 1. Subscripts i, ii, and iii refer to technical replicates for the respective samples.
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pone.0134643.g004: Bray-Curtis dissimilarity.A dendrogram showing the dissimilarity among the 39 samples from 14 mice, based on the Bray-Curtis measure of dissimilarity (range 0–1), with samples colour-coded as blue HW, green WF, and red for LU; C and R are caecal and rectal samples, respectively, all as Table 1. Subscripts i, ii, and iii refer to technical replicates for the respective samples.

Mentions: The Bray-Curtis distance data was used to measure the compositional dissimilarity between all the samples from the mice, including the technical replicates from individual mice (Fig 4). This shows that generally the caecal and rectal samples for individual mice are usually closely clustered. In general therefore, the caecal and rectal samples of a mouse are more similar to each other than they are to samples from different mice. While this was the predominant pattern, there were some exceptions, such as mouse LU273 where the caecal and rectal microbiotas differ considerably by this measure.


The Gut Microbiota of Wild Mice.

Weldon L, Abolins S, Lenzi L, Bourne C, Riley EM, Viney M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bray-Curtis dissimilarity.A dendrogram showing the dissimilarity among the 39 samples from 14 mice, based on the Bray-Curtis measure of dissimilarity (range 0–1), with samples colour-coded as blue HW, green WF, and red for LU; C and R are caecal and rectal samples, respectively, all as Table 1. Subscripts i, ii, and iii refer to technical replicates for the respective samples.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4530874&req=5

pone.0134643.g004: Bray-Curtis dissimilarity.A dendrogram showing the dissimilarity among the 39 samples from 14 mice, based on the Bray-Curtis measure of dissimilarity (range 0–1), with samples colour-coded as blue HW, green WF, and red for LU; C and R are caecal and rectal samples, respectively, all as Table 1. Subscripts i, ii, and iii refer to technical replicates for the respective samples.
Mentions: The Bray-Curtis distance data was used to measure the compositional dissimilarity between all the samples from the mice, including the technical replicates from individual mice (Fig 4). This shows that generally the caecal and rectal samples for individual mice are usually closely clustered. In general therefore, the caecal and rectal samples of a mouse are more similar to each other than they are to samples from different mice. While this was the predominant pattern, there were some exceptions, such as mouse LU273 where the caecal and rectal microbiotas differ considerably by this measure.

Bottom Line: The gut microbiota profoundly affects the biology of its host.The composition of the microbiota is dynamic and is affected by both host genetic and many environmental effects.In this study we have characterised the gut (both the caecum and rectum) microbiota of wild caught Mus musculus domesticus at three UK sites and have investigated how the microbiota varies depending on host location and host characteristics.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
The gut microbiota profoundly affects the biology of its host. The composition of the microbiota is dynamic and is affected by both host genetic and many environmental effects. The gut microbiota of laboratory mice has been studied extensively, which has uncovered many of the effects that the microbiota can have. This work has also shown that the environments of different research institutions can affect the mouse microbiota. There has been relatively limited study of the microbiota of wild mice, but this has shown that it typically differs from that of laboratory mice (and that maintaining wild caught mice in the laboratory can quite quickly alter the microbiota). There is also inter-individual variation in the microbiota of wild mice, with this principally explained by geographical location. In this study we have characterised the gut (both the caecum and rectum) microbiota of wild caught Mus musculus domesticus at three UK sites and have investigated how the microbiota varies depending on host location and host characteristics. We find that the microbiota of these mice are generally consistent with those described from other wild mice. The rectal and caecal microbiotas of individual mice are generally more similar to each other, than they are to the microbiota of other individuals. We found significant differences in the diversity of the microbiotas among mice from different sample sites. There were significant correlations of microbiota diversity and body weight, a measure of age, body-mass index, serum concentration of leptin, and virus, nematode and mite infection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus