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Bacteremia Among Febrile Ugandan Children Treated with Antimalarials Despite a Negative Malaria Test.

Kibuuka A, Byakika-Kibwika P, Achan J, Yeka A, Nalyazi JN, Mpimbaza A, Rosenthal PJ, Kamya MR - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2015)

Bottom Line: Staphylococcus aureus (42%), non-typhoidal Salmonella (24%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (11%), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (9%) were the most common bacterial isolates.On multivariate analysis, history of weight loss (odds ratio [OR] = 2.75; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.27-5.95), presence of pulmonary crackles (OR = 3.63; 95% CI = 1.40-9.45), and leukocytosis (OR = 2.21; 95% CI = 1.09-4.47) were independent predictors of bacteremia.At a referral hospital in Uganda, bacteremia was a remarkably common finding in children with febrile illness who were treated for malaria despite negative malaria test results.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda; Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda; School of Public Health, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda; Child Health and Development Centre, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda; Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, California afizikibuuka@gmail.com.

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Proportions of bacterial pathogens identified. The proportion of bacteria identified from blood cultures is shown. Other species, each identified in one patient, were Haemophilus influenzae, Salmonella typhi, Streptococcus viridians, Acinobacter, Citrobacter, and Enterococcus.
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Figure 1: Proportions of bacterial pathogens identified. The proportion of bacteria identified from blood cultures is shown. Other species, each identified in one patient, were Haemophilus influenzae, Salmonella typhi, Streptococcus viridians, Acinobacter, Citrobacter, and Enterococcus.

Mentions: Bacteremia was identified in 45 (19.1%) children. The commonest isolate was Staphylococcus aureus in 19 (42%) followed by non-typhoidal Salmonella in 11 (24%) (Figure 1Figure 1.


Bacteremia Among Febrile Ugandan Children Treated with Antimalarials Despite a Negative Malaria Test.

Kibuuka A, Byakika-Kibwika P, Achan J, Yeka A, Nalyazi JN, Mpimbaza A, Rosenthal PJ, Kamya MR - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. (2015)

Proportions of bacterial pathogens identified. The proportion of bacteria identified from blood cultures is shown. Other species, each identified in one patient, were Haemophilus influenzae, Salmonella typhi, Streptococcus viridians, Acinobacter, Citrobacter, and Enterococcus.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4530747&req=5

Figure 1: Proportions of bacterial pathogens identified. The proportion of bacteria identified from blood cultures is shown. Other species, each identified in one patient, were Haemophilus influenzae, Salmonella typhi, Streptococcus viridians, Acinobacter, Citrobacter, and Enterococcus.
Mentions: Bacteremia was identified in 45 (19.1%) children. The commonest isolate was Staphylococcus aureus in 19 (42%) followed by non-typhoidal Salmonella in 11 (24%) (Figure 1Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Staphylococcus aureus (42%), non-typhoidal Salmonella (24%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (11%), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (9%) were the most common bacterial isolates.On multivariate analysis, history of weight loss (odds ratio [OR] = 2.75; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.27-5.95), presence of pulmonary crackles (OR = 3.63; 95% CI = 1.40-9.45), and leukocytosis (OR = 2.21; 95% CI = 1.09-4.47) were independent predictors of bacteremia.At a referral hospital in Uganda, bacteremia was a remarkably common finding in children with febrile illness who were treated for malaria despite negative malaria test results.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda; Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda; School of Public Health, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda; Child Health and Development Centre, Makerere University, Kampala, Uganda; Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, California afizikibuuka@gmail.com.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus