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Genomic resources in mungbean for future breeding programs.

Kim SK, Nair RM, Lee J, Lee SH - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: In the past, there have been several efforts to develop molecular markers and linkage maps associated with agronomic traits for the genetic improvement of mungbean and, ultimately, breeding for cultivar development to increase the average yields of mungbean.Moreover, the diverse gene pool of wild mungbean comprises valuable genetic resources of beneficial genes that may be helpful in widening the genetic diversity of cultivated mungbean.This review paper covers the research progress on molecular and genomics approaches and the current status of breeding programs that have developed to move toward the ultimate goal of mungbean improvement.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Science and Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University Seoul, South Korea.

ABSTRACT
Among the legume family, mungbean (Vigna radiata) has become one of the important crops in Asia, showing a steady increase in global production. It provides a good source of protein and contains most notably folate and iron. Beyond the nutritional value of mungbean, certain features make it a well-suited model organism among legume plants because of its small genome size, short life-cycle, self-pollinating, and close genetic relationship to other legumes. In the past, there have been several efforts to develop molecular markers and linkage maps associated with agronomic traits for the genetic improvement of mungbean and, ultimately, breeding for cultivar development to increase the average yields of mungbean. The recent release of a reference genome of the cultivated mungbean (V. radiata var. radiata VC1973A) and an additional de novo sequencing of a wild relative mungbean (V. radiata var. sublobata) has provided a framework for mungbean genetic and genome research, that can further be used for genome-wide association and functional studies to identify genes related to specific agronomic traits. Moreover, the diverse gene pool of wild mungbean comprises valuable genetic resources of beneficial genes that may be helpful in widening the genetic diversity of cultivated mungbean. This review paper covers the research progress on molecular and genomics approaches and the current status of breeding programs that have developed to move toward the ultimate goal of mungbean improvement.

No MeSH data available.


Comparative analysis of the first flower (days to first flowering) QTLs between mungbean and soybean.
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Figure 1: Comparative analysis of the first flower (days to first flowering) QTLs between mungbean and soybean.

Mentions: Recent efforts to identify mungbean flowering genes have been conducted through genome-wide comparative analysis. Of the 207 Arabidopsis genes known to be involved in flowering pathways, 129 are homologous to mungbean genes, including five that are also homologous to soybean flowering genes (Kim et al., 2014). Moreover, some of these genes were localized close to SSR markers on a previous genetic linkage map by Isemura et al. (2012). This type of study enables researchers to uncover QTLs associated with specific traits. Based on sequence data from soybean and mungbean and QTLs from soybean1 controlling major agronomic traits (Chen et al., 2007), putative mungbean QTLs were also identified (Table 3). These major soybean agronomic traits include seed protein content, seed oil content, seed oil-to-protein ratios, pod number, seed weight per plant, seed weight, plant height, pod maturity, leaflet length, leaflet width, and days to first flowering. A circos in Figure 1 shows comparative analysis of first flower QTLs between mungbean and soybean as one of the examples. Of the 1,650 soybean QTLs underlying these 114 traits, a total of 1,089 QTLs were identified in mungbean (Table 4). The number of QTLs detected in mungbean is reasonable, as soybean has undergone two rounds of duplication, whereas mungbean has only undergone one round (Kang et al., 2014). Moreover, extensive conservation of synteny was observed between mungbean and soybean (Figure 1). Kang et al. (2014) performed the comparative analysis between mungbean and soybean by aligning the mungbean genome sequences against the soybean genome, revealing that synteny locks containing QTLs responsible for seed size/germination and bruchid resistance matched soybean synteny blocks containing SSR markers associated with seed weight and nematode resistance QTLs. So far, only few studies have focused on aspects of QTLs and potential candidate gene discovery in mungbean regarding major agronomic traits. The current information provides a good starting point for future molecular biological research in mungbean leading to the identification of target genes.


Genomic resources in mungbean for future breeding programs.

Kim SK, Nair RM, Lee J, Lee SH - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Comparative analysis of the first flower (days to first flowering) QTLs between mungbean and soybean.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4530597&req=5

Figure 1: Comparative analysis of the first flower (days to first flowering) QTLs between mungbean and soybean.
Mentions: Recent efforts to identify mungbean flowering genes have been conducted through genome-wide comparative analysis. Of the 207 Arabidopsis genes known to be involved in flowering pathways, 129 are homologous to mungbean genes, including five that are also homologous to soybean flowering genes (Kim et al., 2014). Moreover, some of these genes were localized close to SSR markers on a previous genetic linkage map by Isemura et al. (2012). This type of study enables researchers to uncover QTLs associated with specific traits. Based on sequence data from soybean and mungbean and QTLs from soybean1 controlling major agronomic traits (Chen et al., 2007), putative mungbean QTLs were also identified (Table 3). These major soybean agronomic traits include seed protein content, seed oil content, seed oil-to-protein ratios, pod number, seed weight per plant, seed weight, plant height, pod maturity, leaflet length, leaflet width, and days to first flowering. A circos in Figure 1 shows comparative analysis of first flower QTLs between mungbean and soybean as one of the examples. Of the 1,650 soybean QTLs underlying these 114 traits, a total of 1,089 QTLs were identified in mungbean (Table 4). The number of QTLs detected in mungbean is reasonable, as soybean has undergone two rounds of duplication, whereas mungbean has only undergone one round (Kang et al., 2014). Moreover, extensive conservation of synteny was observed between mungbean and soybean (Figure 1). Kang et al. (2014) performed the comparative analysis between mungbean and soybean by aligning the mungbean genome sequences against the soybean genome, revealing that synteny locks containing QTLs responsible for seed size/germination and bruchid resistance matched soybean synteny blocks containing SSR markers associated with seed weight and nematode resistance QTLs. So far, only few studies have focused on aspects of QTLs and potential candidate gene discovery in mungbean regarding major agronomic traits. The current information provides a good starting point for future molecular biological research in mungbean leading to the identification of target genes.

Bottom Line: In the past, there have been several efforts to develop molecular markers and linkage maps associated with agronomic traits for the genetic improvement of mungbean and, ultimately, breeding for cultivar development to increase the average yields of mungbean.Moreover, the diverse gene pool of wild mungbean comprises valuable genetic resources of beneficial genes that may be helpful in widening the genetic diversity of cultivated mungbean.This review paper covers the research progress on molecular and genomics approaches and the current status of breeding programs that have developed to move toward the ultimate goal of mungbean improvement.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Plant Science and Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University Seoul, South Korea.

ABSTRACT
Among the legume family, mungbean (Vigna radiata) has become one of the important crops in Asia, showing a steady increase in global production. It provides a good source of protein and contains most notably folate and iron. Beyond the nutritional value of mungbean, certain features make it a well-suited model organism among legume plants because of its small genome size, short life-cycle, self-pollinating, and close genetic relationship to other legumes. In the past, there have been several efforts to develop molecular markers and linkage maps associated with agronomic traits for the genetic improvement of mungbean and, ultimately, breeding for cultivar development to increase the average yields of mungbean. The recent release of a reference genome of the cultivated mungbean (V. radiata var. radiata VC1973A) and an additional de novo sequencing of a wild relative mungbean (V. radiata var. sublobata) has provided a framework for mungbean genetic and genome research, that can further be used for genome-wide association and functional studies to identify genes related to specific agronomic traits. Moreover, the diverse gene pool of wild mungbean comprises valuable genetic resources of beneficial genes that may be helpful in widening the genetic diversity of cultivated mungbean. This review paper covers the research progress on molecular and genomics approaches and the current status of breeding programs that have developed to move toward the ultimate goal of mungbean improvement.

No MeSH data available.