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Dimensional analysis yields the general second-order differential equation underlying many natural phenomena: the mathematical properties of a phenomenon's data plot then specify a unique differential equation for it.

Kepner GR - Theor Biol Med Model (2014)

Bottom Line: This yields a differential equation that describes the relationship among the physical variables governing the phenomenon's behavior.Complex phenomena such as the Standard Normal Distribution, the Logistic Growth Function, and Hill Ligand binding, which are characterized by data plots of distinctly different sigmoidal character, are readily analyzed by this approach.It provides an alternative, simple, unifying basis for analyzing each of these varied phenomena from a common perspective that ties them together and offers new insights into the appropriate empirical constants for describing each phenomenon.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Membrane Studies Project, PO Box 14180, Minneapolis, MN 55414, USA. kepnermsp@yahoo.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study uses dimensional analysis to derive the general second-order differential equation that underlies numerous physical and natural phenomena described by common mathematical functions. It eschews assumptions about empirical constants and mechanisms. It relies only on the data plot's mathematical properties to provide the conditions and constraints needed to specify a second-order differential equation that is free of empirical constants for each phenomenon.

Results: A practical example of each function is analyzed using the general form of the underlying differential equation and the observable unique mathematical properties of each data plot, including boundary conditions. This yields a differential equation that describes the relationship among the physical variables governing the phenomenon's behavior. Complex phenomena such as the Standard Normal Distribution, the Logistic Growth Function, and Hill Ligand binding, which are characterized by data plots of distinctly different sigmoidal character, are readily analyzed by this approach.

Conclusions: It provides an alternative, simple, unifying basis for analyzing each of these varied phenomena from a common perspective that ties them together and offers new insights into the appropriate empirical constants for describing each phenomenon.

Show MeSH
Laminar flow in blood vessel. The red dashed line gives the coordinates slope (v / r). The black dashed line gives the slope at this point (dv / dr).
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Figure 3: Laminar flow in blood vessel. The red dashed line gives the coordinates slope (v / r). The black dashed line gives the slope at this point (dv / dr).

Mentions: Consider the commonly used description of the velocity of laminar blood flow through the uniform length of a cylindrical blood vessel, where Rc = cylinder radius [1]. The velocity, v, is a function of the distance from the center of the vessel, r. Experimental data show (Figure 3) that v is a parabolic function of r, in this simple case, with maximum velocity at the vessel’s center where r = 0.


Dimensional analysis yields the general second-order differential equation underlying many natural phenomena: the mathematical properties of a phenomenon's data plot then specify a unique differential equation for it.

Kepner GR - Theor Biol Med Model (2014)

Laminar flow in blood vessel. The red dashed line gives the coordinates slope (v / r). The black dashed line gives the slope at this point (dv / dr).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4530561&req=5

Figure 3: Laminar flow in blood vessel. The red dashed line gives the coordinates slope (v / r). The black dashed line gives the slope at this point (dv / dr).
Mentions: Consider the commonly used description of the velocity of laminar blood flow through the uniform length of a cylindrical blood vessel, where Rc = cylinder radius [1]. The velocity, v, is a function of the distance from the center of the vessel, r. Experimental data show (Figure 3) that v is a parabolic function of r, in this simple case, with maximum velocity at the vessel’s center where r = 0.

Bottom Line: This yields a differential equation that describes the relationship among the physical variables governing the phenomenon's behavior.Complex phenomena such as the Standard Normal Distribution, the Logistic Growth Function, and Hill Ligand binding, which are characterized by data plots of distinctly different sigmoidal character, are readily analyzed by this approach.It provides an alternative, simple, unifying basis for analyzing each of these varied phenomena from a common perspective that ties them together and offers new insights into the appropriate empirical constants for describing each phenomenon.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Membrane Studies Project, PO Box 14180, Minneapolis, MN 55414, USA. kepnermsp@yahoo.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study uses dimensional analysis to derive the general second-order differential equation that underlies numerous physical and natural phenomena described by common mathematical functions. It eschews assumptions about empirical constants and mechanisms. It relies only on the data plot's mathematical properties to provide the conditions and constraints needed to specify a second-order differential equation that is free of empirical constants for each phenomenon.

Results: A practical example of each function is analyzed using the general form of the underlying differential equation and the observable unique mathematical properties of each data plot, including boundary conditions. This yields a differential equation that describes the relationship among the physical variables governing the phenomenon's behavior. Complex phenomena such as the Standard Normal Distribution, the Logistic Growth Function, and Hill Ligand binding, which are characterized by data plots of distinctly different sigmoidal character, are readily analyzed by this approach.

Conclusions: It provides an alternative, simple, unifying basis for analyzing each of these varied phenomena from a common perspective that ties them together and offers new insights into the appropriate empirical constants for describing each phenomenon.

Show MeSH