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Altered modulation of gamma oscillation frequency by speed of visual motion in children with autism spectrum disorders.

Stroganova TA, Butorina AV, Sysoeva OV, Prokofyev AO, Nikolaeva AY, Tsetlin MM, Orekhova EV - J Neurodev Disord (2015)

Bottom Line: Although frequency of the oscillatory gamma response increased with increasing velocity of visual motion in both groups of participants, the velocity effect was reduced in a substantial proportion of children with ASD.The range of velocity-related gamma frequency modulation correlated inversely with the ability to discriminate oblique line orientation in the ASD group, while no such correlation has been observed in the group of typically developing participants.Our findings suggest that abnormal velocity-related gamma frequency modulation in ASD may constitute a potential biomarker for reduced excitability of fast-spiking inhibitory neurons in a subset of children with ASD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Autism Research Lab, MEG-Center, Moscow State University of Psychology and Education, Sretenka 29, Moscow, 107045 Russian Federation.

ABSTRACT

Background: Recent studies link autism spectrum disorders (ASD) with an altered balance between excitation and inhibition (E/I balance) in cortical networks. The brain oscillations in high gamma-band (50-120 Hz) are sensitive to the E/I balance and may appear useful biomarkers of certain ASD subtypes. The frequency of gamma oscillations is mediated by level of excitation of the fast-spiking inhibitory basket cells recruited by increasing strength of excitatory input. Therefore, the experimental manipulations affecting gamma frequency may throw light on inhibitory networks dysfunction in ASD.

Methods: Here, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate modulation of visual gamma oscillation frequency by speed of drifting annular gratings (1.2, 3.6, 6.0 °/s) in 21 boys with ASD and 26 typically developing boys aged 7-15 years. Multitaper method was used for analysis of spectra of gamma power change upon stimulus presentation and permutation test was applied for statistical comparisons. We also assessed in our participants visual orientation discrimination thresholds, which are thought to depend on excitability of inhibitory networks in the visual cortex.

Results: Although frequency of the oscillatory gamma response increased with increasing velocity of visual motion in both groups of participants, the velocity effect was reduced in a substantial proportion of children with ASD. The range of velocity-related gamma frequency modulation correlated inversely with the ability to discriminate oblique line orientation in the ASD group, while no such correlation has been observed in the group of typically developing participants.

Conclusions: Our findings suggest that abnormal velocity-related gamma frequency modulation in ASD may constitute a potential biomarker for reduced excitability of fast-spiking inhibitory neurons in a subset of children with ASD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Visually induced gamma activity in the TD and ASD groups: grand-averaged time–frequency plots of HGO power changes elicited by gratings drifting at velocities of 1.2, 3.6, and 6.0 °/s. TF plots are shown for gradiometer’s pair MEG2112 and MEG2113 located at the scalp topographical maximum of gamma response. Color scale represents power changes in dB relative to pre-stimulus baseline. Vertical line marks the stimulus onset; horizontal lines correspond to the mean velocity-specific peak frequency (VSPF) in the TD group
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Fig1: Visually induced gamma activity in the TD and ASD groups: grand-averaged time–frequency plots of HGO power changes elicited by gratings drifting at velocities of 1.2, 3.6, and 6.0 °/s. TF plots are shown for gradiometer’s pair MEG2112 and MEG2113 located at the scalp topographical maximum of gamma response. Color scale represents power changes in dB relative to pre-stimulus baseline. Vertical line marks the stimulus onset; horizontal lines correspond to the mean velocity-specific peak frequency (VSPF) in the TD group

Mentions: Inspection of grand average time–frequency plots for power changes shows a robust increase of HGO power within 50–120 Hz frequency range at each stimulus velocity, in both the TD and ASD groups. This increase in high gamma power was sustained for the whole duration of the stimulus presentation (Fig. 1). The inserts in Fig. 2 show topographical distribution of the average HGO response power. As expected, the maximal HGO response clustered over the medial parieto-occipital cortex with a topographical maximum at the gradiometers pair 2112 + 2113 overlaying the occipital midline.Fig. 1


Altered modulation of gamma oscillation frequency by speed of visual motion in children with autism spectrum disorders.

Stroganova TA, Butorina AV, Sysoeva OV, Prokofyev AO, Nikolaeva AY, Tsetlin MM, Orekhova EV - J Neurodev Disord (2015)

Visually induced gamma activity in the TD and ASD groups: grand-averaged time–frequency plots of HGO power changes elicited by gratings drifting at velocities of 1.2, 3.6, and 6.0 °/s. TF plots are shown for gradiometer’s pair MEG2112 and MEG2113 located at the scalp topographical maximum of gamma response. Color scale represents power changes in dB relative to pre-stimulus baseline. Vertical line marks the stimulus onset; horizontal lines correspond to the mean velocity-specific peak frequency (VSPF) in the TD group
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4530485&req=5

Fig1: Visually induced gamma activity in the TD and ASD groups: grand-averaged time–frequency plots of HGO power changes elicited by gratings drifting at velocities of 1.2, 3.6, and 6.0 °/s. TF plots are shown for gradiometer’s pair MEG2112 and MEG2113 located at the scalp topographical maximum of gamma response. Color scale represents power changes in dB relative to pre-stimulus baseline. Vertical line marks the stimulus onset; horizontal lines correspond to the mean velocity-specific peak frequency (VSPF) in the TD group
Mentions: Inspection of grand average time–frequency plots for power changes shows a robust increase of HGO power within 50–120 Hz frequency range at each stimulus velocity, in both the TD and ASD groups. This increase in high gamma power was sustained for the whole duration of the stimulus presentation (Fig. 1). The inserts in Fig. 2 show topographical distribution of the average HGO response power. As expected, the maximal HGO response clustered over the medial parieto-occipital cortex with a topographical maximum at the gradiometers pair 2112 + 2113 overlaying the occipital midline.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Although frequency of the oscillatory gamma response increased with increasing velocity of visual motion in both groups of participants, the velocity effect was reduced in a substantial proportion of children with ASD.The range of velocity-related gamma frequency modulation correlated inversely with the ability to discriminate oblique line orientation in the ASD group, while no such correlation has been observed in the group of typically developing participants.Our findings suggest that abnormal velocity-related gamma frequency modulation in ASD may constitute a potential biomarker for reduced excitability of fast-spiking inhibitory neurons in a subset of children with ASD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Autism Research Lab, MEG-Center, Moscow State University of Psychology and Education, Sretenka 29, Moscow, 107045 Russian Federation.

ABSTRACT

Background: Recent studies link autism spectrum disorders (ASD) with an altered balance between excitation and inhibition (E/I balance) in cortical networks. The brain oscillations in high gamma-band (50-120 Hz) are sensitive to the E/I balance and may appear useful biomarkers of certain ASD subtypes. The frequency of gamma oscillations is mediated by level of excitation of the fast-spiking inhibitory basket cells recruited by increasing strength of excitatory input. Therefore, the experimental manipulations affecting gamma frequency may throw light on inhibitory networks dysfunction in ASD.

Methods: Here, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to investigate modulation of visual gamma oscillation frequency by speed of drifting annular gratings (1.2, 3.6, 6.0 °/s) in 21 boys with ASD and 26 typically developing boys aged 7-15 years. Multitaper method was used for analysis of spectra of gamma power change upon stimulus presentation and permutation test was applied for statistical comparisons. We also assessed in our participants visual orientation discrimination thresholds, which are thought to depend on excitability of inhibitory networks in the visual cortex.

Results: Although frequency of the oscillatory gamma response increased with increasing velocity of visual motion in both groups of participants, the velocity effect was reduced in a substantial proportion of children with ASD. The range of velocity-related gamma frequency modulation correlated inversely with the ability to discriminate oblique line orientation in the ASD group, while no such correlation has been observed in the group of typically developing participants.

Conclusions: Our findings suggest that abnormal velocity-related gamma frequency modulation in ASD may constitute a potential biomarker for reduced excitability of fast-spiking inhibitory neurons in a subset of children with ASD.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus