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Feeding regulates sex pheromone attraction and courtship in Drosophila females.

Lebreton S, Trona F, Borrero-Echeverry F, Bilz F, Grabe V, Becher PG, Carlsson MA, Nässel DR, Hansson BS, Sachse S, Witzgall P - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Starvation increases, and feeding reduces attraction to food odour, in both sexes.Adding cVA to food odour, however, maintains attraction in fed females, while it has no effect in males.Knocking down insulin receptors in neurons converging onto the DA1 glomerulus suggests that insulin-signalling partly controls pheromone perception in the AL, and adjusts cVA attraction according to nutritional state and sexual receptivity in Drosophila females.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Plant Protection Biology, Division of Chemical Ecology, Alnarp, Sweden [2] Department of Evolutionary Neuroethology, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Jena, Germany.

ABSTRACT
In Drosophila melanogaster, gender-specific behavioural responses to the male-produced sex pheromone cis-vaccenyl acetate (cVA) rely on sexually dimorphic, third-order neural circuits. We show that nutritional state in female flies modulates cVA perception in first-order olfactory neurons. Starvation increases, and feeding reduces attraction to food odour, in both sexes. Adding cVA to food odour, however, maintains attraction in fed females, while it has no effect in males. Upregulation of sensitivity and behavioural responsiveness to cVA in fed females is paralleled by a strong increase in receptivity to male courtship. Functional imaging of the antennal lobe (AL), the olfactory centre in the insect brain, shows that olfactory input to DA1 and VM2 glomeruli is also modulated by starvation. Knocking down insulin receptors in neurons converging onto the DA1 glomerulus suggests that insulin-signalling partly controls pheromone perception in the AL, and adjusts cVA attraction according to nutritional state and sexual receptivity in Drosophila females.

No MeSH data available.


Graphical abstract.Starved insects, females and males, are attracted to food odour. Fed females, which are receptive to male courtship, but not fed males, are attracted to blends of cVA and food odour. Insulin signalling in first-order olfactory neurons in the antennal lobe (AL), in DA1 and VM2 glomeruli, contributes to this behavioural reaction.
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f6: Graphical abstract.Starved insects, females and males, are attracted to food odour. Fed females, which are receptive to male courtship, but not fed males, are attracted to blends of cVA and food odour. Insulin signalling in first-order olfactory neurons in the antennal lobe (AL), in DA1 and VM2 glomeruli, contributes to this behavioural reaction.

Mentions: Drosophila males and females meet on ripe fruit where they feed, mate and oviposit638. Accordingly, they perceive food olfactory cues and pheromones as an ensemble. That environmental and social cues cannot be dissociated in natural habitats is reflected by the behavioural and chemical ecology of the fly. Grosjean et al.13 established how food odours enhance the sexual behaviour of Drosophila males. Projection neurons downstream of sensory neurons dedicated to pheromone and food odours converge in the pheromone processing region of the lateral horn, to promote male courtship behaviour. We here show that females and males use a first-order olfactory pathway for the integration of male-produced sex pheromone cVA and food signals, and that the female behavioural response to sex and food odours is modulated by its nutritional state, which also influences sexual receptivity (Fig. 6).


Feeding regulates sex pheromone attraction and courtship in Drosophila females.

Lebreton S, Trona F, Borrero-Echeverry F, Bilz F, Grabe V, Becher PG, Carlsson MA, Nässel DR, Hansson BS, Sachse S, Witzgall P - Sci Rep (2015)

Graphical abstract.Starved insects, females and males, are attracted to food odour. Fed females, which are receptive to male courtship, but not fed males, are attracted to blends of cVA and food odour. Insulin signalling in first-order olfactory neurons in the antennal lobe (AL), in DA1 and VM2 glomeruli, contributes to this behavioural reaction.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4530334&req=5

f6: Graphical abstract.Starved insects, females and males, are attracted to food odour. Fed females, which are receptive to male courtship, but not fed males, are attracted to blends of cVA and food odour. Insulin signalling in first-order olfactory neurons in the antennal lobe (AL), in DA1 and VM2 glomeruli, contributes to this behavioural reaction.
Mentions: Drosophila males and females meet on ripe fruit where they feed, mate and oviposit638. Accordingly, they perceive food olfactory cues and pheromones as an ensemble. That environmental and social cues cannot be dissociated in natural habitats is reflected by the behavioural and chemical ecology of the fly. Grosjean et al.13 established how food odours enhance the sexual behaviour of Drosophila males. Projection neurons downstream of sensory neurons dedicated to pheromone and food odours converge in the pheromone processing region of the lateral horn, to promote male courtship behaviour. We here show that females and males use a first-order olfactory pathway for the integration of male-produced sex pheromone cVA and food signals, and that the female behavioural response to sex and food odours is modulated by its nutritional state, which also influences sexual receptivity (Fig. 6).

Bottom Line: Starvation increases, and feeding reduces attraction to food odour, in both sexes.Adding cVA to food odour, however, maintains attraction in fed females, while it has no effect in males.Knocking down insulin receptors in neurons converging onto the DA1 glomerulus suggests that insulin-signalling partly controls pheromone perception in the AL, and adjusts cVA attraction according to nutritional state and sexual receptivity in Drosophila females.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Department of Plant Protection Biology, Division of Chemical Ecology, Alnarp, Sweden [2] Department of Evolutionary Neuroethology, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Jena, Germany.

ABSTRACT
In Drosophila melanogaster, gender-specific behavioural responses to the male-produced sex pheromone cis-vaccenyl acetate (cVA) rely on sexually dimorphic, third-order neural circuits. We show that nutritional state in female flies modulates cVA perception in first-order olfactory neurons. Starvation increases, and feeding reduces attraction to food odour, in both sexes. Adding cVA to food odour, however, maintains attraction in fed females, while it has no effect in males. Upregulation of sensitivity and behavioural responsiveness to cVA in fed females is paralleled by a strong increase in receptivity to male courtship. Functional imaging of the antennal lobe (AL), the olfactory centre in the insect brain, shows that olfactory input to DA1 and VM2 glomeruli is also modulated by starvation. Knocking down insulin receptors in neurons converging onto the DA1 glomerulus suggests that insulin-signalling partly controls pheromone perception in the AL, and adjusts cVA attraction according to nutritional state and sexual receptivity in Drosophila females.

No MeSH data available.