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Current Understanding of Circulating Tumor Cells - Potential Value in Malignancies of the Central Nervous System.

Adamczyk LA, Williams H, Frankow A, Ellis HP, Haynes HR, Perks C, Holly JM, Kurian KM - Front Neurol (2015)

Bottom Line: Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood via so-called "liquid biopsies" carries enormous clinical potential in malignancies of the central nervous system (CNS) because of the potential to follow disease evolution with a blood test, without the need for repeat neurosurgical procedures with their inherent risk of patient morbidity.To date, studies in non-CNS malignancies, particularly in breast cancer, show increasing reproducibility of detection methods for these rare tumor cells in the circulation.In CNS malignancies, one of the main challenges is finding a suitable biomarker for identification of these cells, because automated systems, such as the widely used Cell Search system, are reliant on markers, such as the epithelial cell adhesion molecule, which are not present in CNS tumors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cellular Pathology, North Bristol NHS Trust , Bristol , UK.

ABSTRACT
Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood via so-called "liquid biopsies" carries enormous clinical potential in malignancies of the central nervous system (CNS) because of the potential to follow disease evolution with a blood test, without the need for repeat neurosurgical procedures with their inherent risk of patient morbidity. To date, studies in non-CNS malignancies, particularly in breast cancer, show increasing reproducibility of detection methods for these rare tumor cells in the circulation. However, no method has yet received full recommendation to use in clinical practice, in part because of lack of a sufficient evidence base regarding clinical utility. In CNS malignancies, one of the main challenges is finding a suitable biomarker for identification of these cells, because automated systems, such as the widely used Cell Search system, are reliant on markers, such as the epithelial cell adhesion molecule, which are not present in CNS tumors. This review examines methods for CTC enrichment and detection, and reviews the progress in non-CNS tumors and the potential for using this technique in human brain tumors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Row (A) demonstrates methods of biological CTC enrichment using magnetically labeled antibodies captured in a magnetic chamber or by posts or rods. Row (B) illustrates physical enrichment methods: membrane filtration, microfluidics, Ficoll gradient centrifugation, Dean drag forces separation, and dielectrophoresis. Row (C) outlines the most common principles of cell enumeration: IHC, RT-PCR, fluorescent antibody labeling, invasion assay, or antibody-coated beads. Based on Alix-Panabieres and Pantel (46) with permission.
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Figure 1: Row (A) demonstrates methods of biological CTC enrichment using magnetically labeled antibodies captured in a magnetic chamber or by posts or rods. Row (B) illustrates physical enrichment methods: membrane filtration, microfluidics, Ficoll gradient centrifugation, Dean drag forces separation, and dielectrophoresis. Row (C) outlines the most common principles of cell enumeration: IHC, RT-PCR, fluorescent antibody labeling, invasion assay, or antibody-coated beads. Based on Alix-Panabieres and Pantel (46) with permission.

Mentions: Figure 1 presents the most commonly described methods of CTC enrichment and detection. A standard 7.5–10 ml blood sample is processed within 2 h of withdrawal. Biological enrichment incorporates anti-epithelial, leukocytic, or mesenchymal antibodies labeled by a magnetic particle or affixed to a post or a rod (20, 39, 55). Positive enrichment relies on selective capture of CTCs, while negative enrichment through labeling of CD45 filters out cells which express leukocytic markers (22).


Current Understanding of Circulating Tumor Cells - Potential Value in Malignancies of the Central Nervous System.

Adamczyk LA, Williams H, Frankow A, Ellis HP, Haynes HR, Perks C, Holly JM, Kurian KM - Front Neurol (2015)

Row (A) demonstrates methods of biological CTC enrichment using magnetically labeled antibodies captured in a magnetic chamber or by posts or rods. Row (B) illustrates physical enrichment methods: membrane filtration, microfluidics, Ficoll gradient centrifugation, Dean drag forces separation, and dielectrophoresis. Row (C) outlines the most common principles of cell enumeration: IHC, RT-PCR, fluorescent antibody labeling, invasion assay, or antibody-coated beads. Based on Alix-Panabieres and Pantel (46) with permission.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4530310&req=5

Figure 1: Row (A) demonstrates methods of biological CTC enrichment using magnetically labeled antibodies captured in a magnetic chamber or by posts or rods. Row (B) illustrates physical enrichment methods: membrane filtration, microfluidics, Ficoll gradient centrifugation, Dean drag forces separation, and dielectrophoresis. Row (C) outlines the most common principles of cell enumeration: IHC, RT-PCR, fluorescent antibody labeling, invasion assay, or antibody-coated beads. Based on Alix-Panabieres and Pantel (46) with permission.
Mentions: Figure 1 presents the most commonly described methods of CTC enrichment and detection. A standard 7.5–10 ml blood sample is processed within 2 h of withdrawal. Biological enrichment incorporates anti-epithelial, leukocytic, or mesenchymal antibodies labeled by a magnetic particle or affixed to a post or a rod (20, 39, 55). Positive enrichment relies on selective capture of CTCs, while negative enrichment through labeling of CD45 filters out cells which express leukocytic markers (22).

Bottom Line: Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood via so-called "liquid biopsies" carries enormous clinical potential in malignancies of the central nervous system (CNS) because of the potential to follow disease evolution with a blood test, without the need for repeat neurosurgical procedures with their inherent risk of patient morbidity.To date, studies in non-CNS malignancies, particularly in breast cancer, show increasing reproducibility of detection methods for these rare tumor cells in the circulation.In CNS malignancies, one of the main challenges is finding a suitable biomarker for identification of these cells, because automated systems, such as the widely used Cell Search system, are reliant on markers, such as the epithelial cell adhesion molecule, which are not present in CNS tumors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cellular Pathology, North Bristol NHS Trust , Bristol , UK.

ABSTRACT
Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood via so-called "liquid biopsies" carries enormous clinical potential in malignancies of the central nervous system (CNS) because of the potential to follow disease evolution with a blood test, without the need for repeat neurosurgical procedures with their inherent risk of patient morbidity. To date, studies in non-CNS malignancies, particularly in breast cancer, show increasing reproducibility of detection methods for these rare tumor cells in the circulation. However, no method has yet received full recommendation to use in clinical practice, in part because of lack of a sufficient evidence base regarding clinical utility. In CNS malignancies, one of the main challenges is finding a suitable biomarker for identification of these cells, because automated systems, such as the widely used Cell Search system, are reliant on markers, such as the epithelial cell adhesion molecule, which are not present in CNS tumors. This review examines methods for CTC enrichment and detection, and reviews the progress in non-CNS tumors and the potential for using this technique in human brain tumors.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus