Limits...
Comparative Evaluation of Two Venous Sampling Techniques for the Assessment of Pancreatic Insulin and Zinc Release upon Glucose Challenge.

Pillai AK, Silvers W, Christensen P, Riegel M, Adams-Huet B, Lingvay I, Sun X, Öz OK - J Diabetes Res (2015)

Bottom Line: The purpose of this study was to compare two different percutaneous image-guided techniques: transhepatic ultrasound guided portal vein access and transsplenic fluoroscopy guided splenic vein access for ease of access, safety, and evaluation of temporal kinetics of insulin and zinc release into the venous effluent from the pancreas.Both techniques were safe, reproducible, and easy to perform.Statistically higher insulin concentration but similar zinc release after a glucose challenge was observed from splenic vein samples, as compared to the ones from the portal vein.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390, USA.

ABSTRACT
Advances in noninvasive imaging modalities have provided opportunities to study β cell function through imaging zinc release from insulin secreting β cells. Understanding the temporal secretory pattern of insulin and zinc corelease after a glucose challenge is essential for proper timing of administration of zinc sensing probes. Portal venous sampling is an essential part of pharmacological and nutritional studies in animal models. The purpose of this study was to compare two different percutaneous image-guided techniques: transhepatic ultrasound guided portal vein access and transsplenic fluoroscopy guided splenic vein access for ease of access, safety, and evaluation of temporal kinetics of insulin and zinc release into the venous effluent from the pancreas. Both techniques were safe, reproducible, and easy to perform. The mean time required to obtain desired catheter position for venous sampling was 15 minutes shorter using the transsplenic technique. A clear biphasic insulin release profile was observed in both techniques. Statistically higher insulin concentration but similar zinc release after a glucose challenge was observed from splenic vein samples, as compared to the ones from the portal vein. To our knowledge, this is the first report of percutaneous methods to assess zinc release kinetics from the porcine pancreas.

No MeSH data available.


Preinterventional planning CT angiography. Coronal CT angiogram demonstrating the normal vascular anatomy of the portal venous system. Note the splenoportal confluence (arrow) and the long extra-hepatic course of the portal vein (arrowheads) in relation to the pancreatic duodenal lobe (DL) and the splenic lobe (SL). Both pancreas lobes are outlined in green.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4530279&req=5

fig1: Preinterventional planning CT angiography. Coronal CT angiogram demonstrating the normal vascular anatomy of the portal venous system. Note the splenoportal confluence (arrow) and the long extra-hepatic course of the portal vein (arrowheads) in relation to the pancreatic duodenal lobe (DL) and the splenic lobe (SL). Both pancreas lobes are outlined in green.

Mentions: Prior to interventional radiology procedures, CT angiography was undertaken to obtain an idea of venous anatomy in the upper abdomen of the pig. Figure 1 is a representative illustration of the portal venous anatomy vasculature in the upper abdomen of an Ossabaw pig along with its spatial relation to the pancreatic splenic lobe (SL) and duodenal lobe (DL). The splenic vein is partially bounded by the SL of the pancreas and unites with the superior mesenteric vein to form the portal vein, to which the splenic vein drains [20]. The DL of the pancreas rests against the base of the portal vein, which has a 2-3 cm extra-hepatic course and divides at the hepatic hilum into the right and left portal veins.


Comparative Evaluation of Two Venous Sampling Techniques for the Assessment of Pancreatic Insulin and Zinc Release upon Glucose Challenge.

Pillai AK, Silvers W, Christensen P, Riegel M, Adams-Huet B, Lingvay I, Sun X, Öz OK - J Diabetes Res (2015)

Preinterventional planning CT angiography. Coronal CT angiogram demonstrating the normal vascular anatomy of the portal venous system. Note the splenoportal confluence (arrow) and the long extra-hepatic course of the portal vein (arrowheads) in relation to the pancreatic duodenal lobe (DL) and the splenic lobe (SL). Both pancreas lobes are outlined in green.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4530279&req=5

fig1: Preinterventional planning CT angiography. Coronal CT angiogram demonstrating the normal vascular anatomy of the portal venous system. Note the splenoportal confluence (arrow) and the long extra-hepatic course of the portal vein (arrowheads) in relation to the pancreatic duodenal lobe (DL) and the splenic lobe (SL). Both pancreas lobes are outlined in green.
Mentions: Prior to interventional radiology procedures, CT angiography was undertaken to obtain an idea of venous anatomy in the upper abdomen of the pig. Figure 1 is a representative illustration of the portal venous anatomy vasculature in the upper abdomen of an Ossabaw pig along with its spatial relation to the pancreatic splenic lobe (SL) and duodenal lobe (DL). The splenic vein is partially bounded by the SL of the pancreas and unites with the superior mesenteric vein to form the portal vein, to which the splenic vein drains [20]. The DL of the pancreas rests against the base of the portal vein, which has a 2-3 cm extra-hepatic course and divides at the hepatic hilum into the right and left portal veins.

Bottom Line: The purpose of this study was to compare two different percutaneous image-guided techniques: transhepatic ultrasound guided portal vein access and transsplenic fluoroscopy guided splenic vein access for ease of access, safety, and evaluation of temporal kinetics of insulin and zinc release into the venous effluent from the pancreas.Both techniques were safe, reproducible, and easy to perform.Statistically higher insulin concentration but similar zinc release after a glucose challenge was observed from splenic vein samples, as compared to the ones from the portal vein.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390, USA.

ABSTRACT
Advances in noninvasive imaging modalities have provided opportunities to study β cell function through imaging zinc release from insulin secreting β cells. Understanding the temporal secretory pattern of insulin and zinc corelease after a glucose challenge is essential for proper timing of administration of zinc sensing probes. Portal venous sampling is an essential part of pharmacological and nutritional studies in animal models. The purpose of this study was to compare two different percutaneous image-guided techniques: transhepatic ultrasound guided portal vein access and transsplenic fluoroscopy guided splenic vein access for ease of access, safety, and evaluation of temporal kinetics of insulin and zinc release into the venous effluent from the pancreas. Both techniques were safe, reproducible, and easy to perform. The mean time required to obtain desired catheter position for venous sampling was 15 minutes shorter using the transsplenic technique. A clear biphasic insulin release profile was observed in both techniques. Statistically higher insulin concentration but similar zinc release after a glucose challenge was observed from splenic vein samples, as compared to the ones from the portal vein. To our knowledge, this is the first report of percutaneous methods to assess zinc release kinetics from the porcine pancreas.

No MeSH data available.