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Dysglycaemia and Other Predictors for Progression or Regression from Impaired Fasting Glucose to Diabetes or Normoglycaemia.

de Abreu L, Holloway KL, Kotowicz MA, Pasco JA - J Diabetes Res (2015)

Bottom Line: Over a decade, the incidence of progression from IFG to diabetes was 18.1 per 1,000 person-years (95% CI, 10.7-28.2).Our results show a transitional process; those with IFG had risk factors intermediate to normoglycaemics and those with diabetes.This investigation may help target interventions to those with IFG at high risk of progression to diabetes and thereby prevent cases of diabetes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Medicine, Deakin University, 285 Ryrie Street, Geelong, VIC 3220, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Aims: Diabetes mellitus is a growing health problem worldwide. This study aimed to describe dysglycaemia and determine the impact of body composition and clinical and lifestyle factors on the risk of progression or regression from impaired fasting glucose (IFG) to diabetes or normoglycaemia in Australian women.

Methods: This study included 1167 women, aged 20-94 years, enrolled in the Geelong Osteoporosis Study. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify predictors for progression to diabetes or regression to normoglycaemia (from IFG), over 10 years of follow-up.

Results: At baseline the proportion of women with IFG was 33.8% and 6.5% had diabetes. Those with fasting dysglycaemia had higher obesity-related factors, lower serum HDL cholesterol, and lower physical activity. Over a decade, the incidence of progression from IFG to diabetes was 18.1 per 1,000 person-years (95% CI, 10.7-28.2). Fasting plasma glucose and serum triglycerides were important factors in both progression to diabetes and regression to normoglycaemia.

Conclusions: Our results show a transitional process; those with IFG had risk factors intermediate to normoglycaemics and those with diabetes. This investigation may help target interventions to those with IFG at high risk of progression to diabetes and thereby prevent cases of diabetes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Numbers of women in each of the three glycaemia groups who became normoglycaemic and developed impaired fasting glucose or diabetes over the 10-year follow-up. Note: missing data for 354 women with normoglycaemia at baseline, 208 women with impaired fasting glucose at baseline, and 47 women with diabetes at baseline.
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fig2: Numbers of women in each of the three glycaemia groups who became normoglycaemic and developed impaired fasting glucose or diabetes over the 10-year follow-up. Note: missing data for 354 women with normoglycaemia at baseline, 208 women with impaired fasting glucose at baseline, and 47 women with diabetes at baseline.

Mentions: All women with diabetes at baseline were again classified as diabetics at the 10-year follow-up (Figure 2). Among 335 women with normoglycaemia at baseline, 280 (83.6%) remained in this category at 10-year follow-up, 44 (13.1%) changed to IFG, and 11 (3.3%) progressed to diabetes. Among 187 women with IFG at baseline, 62 (33.2%) remained IFG, 104 (55.6%) reverted to normoglycaemia, and 21 (11.2%) developed diabetes. Characteristics of those with IFG at baseline are shown in Table 2, together with a comparison of characteristics for those who remained in the IFG group, those who progressed to diabetes, and those who regressed to normoglycaemia. A comparison between the three groups showed that those who progressed to diabetes had higher FPG and greater indices of adiposity including weight, BMI, body fat mass, waist and hip circumference, WHR, WHtR, systolic blood pressure, hypertension, serum triglycerides, and obesity; they also had greater lean body mass and lower serum HDL. When analysing metabolic syndrome, the results were similar to Table 1; more than 70% of those who remained in the IFG group or progressed to diabetes were affected. Only about half of those who regressed to normoglycaemia had metabolic syndrome. The results for metabolic syndrome when FPG was excluded showed a different pattern; in all glycaemia groups, fewer women were classified as having metabolic syndrome. There was a gradual increase in proportions of those with metabolic syndrome across the groups, from 25.0% in the normoglycaemic group to 46.8% in the IFG group and 61.9% in the diabetic group.


Dysglycaemia and Other Predictors for Progression or Regression from Impaired Fasting Glucose to Diabetes or Normoglycaemia.

de Abreu L, Holloway KL, Kotowicz MA, Pasco JA - J Diabetes Res (2015)

Numbers of women in each of the three glycaemia groups who became normoglycaemic and developed impaired fasting glucose or diabetes over the 10-year follow-up. Note: missing data for 354 women with normoglycaemia at baseline, 208 women with impaired fasting glucose at baseline, and 47 women with diabetes at baseline.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4530268&req=5

fig2: Numbers of women in each of the three glycaemia groups who became normoglycaemic and developed impaired fasting glucose or diabetes over the 10-year follow-up. Note: missing data for 354 women with normoglycaemia at baseline, 208 women with impaired fasting glucose at baseline, and 47 women with diabetes at baseline.
Mentions: All women with diabetes at baseline were again classified as diabetics at the 10-year follow-up (Figure 2). Among 335 women with normoglycaemia at baseline, 280 (83.6%) remained in this category at 10-year follow-up, 44 (13.1%) changed to IFG, and 11 (3.3%) progressed to diabetes. Among 187 women with IFG at baseline, 62 (33.2%) remained IFG, 104 (55.6%) reverted to normoglycaemia, and 21 (11.2%) developed diabetes. Characteristics of those with IFG at baseline are shown in Table 2, together with a comparison of characteristics for those who remained in the IFG group, those who progressed to diabetes, and those who regressed to normoglycaemia. A comparison between the three groups showed that those who progressed to diabetes had higher FPG and greater indices of adiposity including weight, BMI, body fat mass, waist and hip circumference, WHR, WHtR, systolic blood pressure, hypertension, serum triglycerides, and obesity; they also had greater lean body mass and lower serum HDL. When analysing metabolic syndrome, the results were similar to Table 1; more than 70% of those who remained in the IFG group or progressed to diabetes were affected. Only about half of those who regressed to normoglycaemia had metabolic syndrome. The results for metabolic syndrome when FPG was excluded showed a different pattern; in all glycaemia groups, fewer women were classified as having metabolic syndrome. There was a gradual increase in proportions of those with metabolic syndrome across the groups, from 25.0% in the normoglycaemic group to 46.8% in the IFG group and 61.9% in the diabetic group.

Bottom Line: Over a decade, the incidence of progression from IFG to diabetes was 18.1 per 1,000 person-years (95% CI, 10.7-28.2).Our results show a transitional process; those with IFG had risk factors intermediate to normoglycaemics and those with diabetes.This investigation may help target interventions to those with IFG at high risk of progression to diabetes and thereby prevent cases of diabetes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Medicine, Deakin University, 285 Ryrie Street, Geelong, VIC 3220, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Aims: Diabetes mellitus is a growing health problem worldwide. This study aimed to describe dysglycaemia and determine the impact of body composition and clinical and lifestyle factors on the risk of progression or regression from impaired fasting glucose (IFG) to diabetes or normoglycaemia in Australian women.

Methods: This study included 1167 women, aged 20-94 years, enrolled in the Geelong Osteoporosis Study. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify predictors for progression to diabetes or regression to normoglycaemia (from IFG), over 10 years of follow-up.

Results: At baseline the proportion of women with IFG was 33.8% and 6.5% had diabetes. Those with fasting dysglycaemia had higher obesity-related factors, lower serum HDL cholesterol, and lower physical activity. Over a decade, the incidence of progression from IFG to diabetes was 18.1 per 1,000 person-years (95% CI, 10.7-28.2). Fasting plasma glucose and serum triglycerides were important factors in both progression to diabetes and regression to normoglycaemia.

Conclusions: Our results show a transitional process; those with IFG had risk factors intermediate to normoglycaemics and those with diabetes. This investigation may help target interventions to those with IFG at high risk of progression to diabetes and thereby prevent cases of diabetes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus