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Edible Bird's Nest Prevents High Fat Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance in Rats.

Yida Z, Imam MU, Ismail M, Ooi DJ, Sarega N, Azmi NH, Ismail N, Chan KW, Hou Z, Yusuf NB - J Diabetes Res (2015)

Bottom Line: Edible bird's nest (EBN) is used traditionally in many parts of Asia to improve wellbeing, but there are limited studies on its efficacy.During the intervention period, weight measurements were recorded weekly.The results suggest that EBN may be used as functional food to prevent insulin resistance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia ; Cardiology Department, Affiliated Hospital of Chengde Medical University, Chengde, Hebei 067000, China.

ABSTRACT
Edible bird's nest (EBN) is used traditionally in many parts of Asia to improve wellbeing, but there are limited studies on its efficacy. We explored the potential use of EBN for prevention of high fat diet- (HFD-) induced insulin resistance in rats. HFD was given to rats with or without simvastatin or EBN for 12 weeks. During the intervention period, weight measurements were recorded weekly. Blood samples were collected at the end of the intervention and oral glucose tolerance test conducted, after which the rats were sacrificed and their liver and adipose tissues collected for further studies. Serum adiponectin, leptin, F2-isoprostane, insulin, and lipid profile were estimated, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance computed. Effects of the different interventions on transcriptional regulation of insulin signaling genes were also evaluated. The results showed that HFD worsened metabolic indices and induced insulin resistance partly through transcriptional regulation of the insulin signaling genes. Additionally, simvastatin was able to prevent hypercholesterolemia but promoted insulin resistance similar to HFD. EBN, on the other hand, prevented the worsening of metabolic indices and transcriptional changes in insulin signaling genes due to HFD. The results suggest that EBN may be used as functional food to prevent insulin resistance.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Proposed schematic showing targets of edible bird's nest (EBN) action in the insulin signaling pathway. EBN prevents insulin resistance in high fat diet rats by influencing the transcriptional regulation of multiple genes.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig8: Proposed schematic showing targets of edible bird's nest (EBN) action in the insulin signaling pathway. EBN prevents insulin resistance in high fat diet rats by influencing the transcriptional regulation of multiple genes.

Mentions: Based on the patterns of expression in the liver and adipose tissues, we propose that EBN may be exerting its effect on insulin sensitivity through increased expression and likely activity of several genes involved in the insulin signaling pathway in the liver and adipose tissues (Figure 8). Although simvastatin is able to lower cholesterol levels (Table 4), its effects on insulin signaling genes (Figures 5, 6, and 7) tended towards insulin resistance, in agreement with previous reports. Liver and adipose tissues are involved in development of insulin resistance, and in fact they have been proposed to be the organs from where the problem is initiated. Therefore, the enhanced sensitivity of insulin in these tissues suggests that EBN is effective at preventing insulin resistance. Furthermore, we hypothesize that synergism of multiple bioactives in EBN is contributing to the overall bioactivity observed.


Edible Bird's Nest Prevents High Fat Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance in Rats.

Yida Z, Imam MU, Ismail M, Ooi DJ, Sarega N, Azmi NH, Ismail N, Chan KW, Hou Z, Yusuf NB - J Diabetes Res (2015)

Proposed schematic showing targets of edible bird's nest (EBN) action in the insulin signaling pathway. EBN prevents insulin resistance in high fat diet rats by influencing the transcriptional regulation of multiple genes.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4530265&req=5

fig8: Proposed schematic showing targets of edible bird's nest (EBN) action in the insulin signaling pathway. EBN prevents insulin resistance in high fat diet rats by influencing the transcriptional regulation of multiple genes.
Mentions: Based on the patterns of expression in the liver and adipose tissues, we propose that EBN may be exerting its effect on insulin sensitivity through increased expression and likely activity of several genes involved in the insulin signaling pathway in the liver and adipose tissues (Figure 8). Although simvastatin is able to lower cholesterol levels (Table 4), its effects on insulin signaling genes (Figures 5, 6, and 7) tended towards insulin resistance, in agreement with previous reports. Liver and adipose tissues are involved in development of insulin resistance, and in fact they have been proposed to be the organs from where the problem is initiated. Therefore, the enhanced sensitivity of insulin in these tissues suggests that EBN is effective at preventing insulin resistance. Furthermore, we hypothesize that synergism of multiple bioactives in EBN is contributing to the overall bioactivity observed.

Bottom Line: Edible bird's nest (EBN) is used traditionally in many parts of Asia to improve wellbeing, but there are limited studies on its efficacy.During the intervention period, weight measurements were recorded weekly.The results suggest that EBN may be used as functional food to prevent insulin resistance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Bioscience, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia ; Cardiology Department, Affiliated Hospital of Chengde Medical University, Chengde, Hebei 067000, China.

ABSTRACT
Edible bird's nest (EBN) is used traditionally in many parts of Asia to improve wellbeing, but there are limited studies on its efficacy. We explored the potential use of EBN for prevention of high fat diet- (HFD-) induced insulin resistance in rats. HFD was given to rats with or without simvastatin or EBN for 12 weeks. During the intervention period, weight measurements were recorded weekly. Blood samples were collected at the end of the intervention and oral glucose tolerance test conducted, after which the rats were sacrificed and their liver and adipose tissues collected for further studies. Serum adiponectin, leptin, F2-isoprostane, insulin, and lipid profile were estimated, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance computed. Effects of the different interventions on transcriptional regulation of insulin signaling genes were also evaluated. The results showed that HFD worsened metabolic indices and induced insulin resistance partly through transcriptional regulation of the insulin signaling genes. Additionally, simvastatin was able to prevent hypercholesterolemia but promoted insulin resistance similar to HFD. EBN, on the other hand, prevented the worsening of metabolic indices and transcriptional changes in insulin signaling genes due to HFD. The results suggest that EBN may be used as functional food to prevent insulin resistance.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus