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Emotional Processing, Recognition, Empathy and Evoked Facial Expression in Eating Disorders: An Experimental Study to Map Deficits in Social Cognition.

Cardi V, Corfield F, Leppanen J, Rhind C, Deriziotis S, Hadjimichalis A, Hibbs R, Micali N, Treasure J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Participants with EDs did not display specific abnormalities in emotional processing, recognition and empathic response to others' basic discrete emotions.However, they had poorer facial expressivity and a tendency to turn away from emotional displays.Treatments focusing on the development of non-verbal emotional communication skills might be of benefit for patients with EDs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Eating Disorders, Psychological Medicine, King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, London, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Background: Difficulties in social cognition have been identified in eating disorders (EDs), but the exact profile of these abnormalities is unclear. The aim of this study is to examine distinct processes of social-cognition in this patient group, including attentional processing and recognition, empathic reaction and evoked facial expression in response to discrete vignettes of others displaying positive (i.e. happiness) or negative (i.e. sadness and anger) emotions.

Method: One hundred and thirty-eight female participants were included in the study: 73 healthy controls (HCs) and 65 individuals with an ED (49 with Anorexia Nervosa and 16 with Bulimia Nervosa). Self-report and behavioural measures were used.

Results: Participants with EDs did not display specific abnormalities in emotional processing, recognition and empathic response to others' basic discrete emotions. However, they had poorer facial expressivity and a tendency to turn away from emotional displays.

Conclusion: Treatments focusing on the development of non-verbal emotional communication skills might be of benefit for patients with EDs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Frequencies of positive and negative facial expressions shown by participants with Eating Disorders and Healthy Controls.Mean frequencies of positive facial expressions shown in response to happy displays and negative facial expressions shown in response to negative displays (i.e. sadness and anger) in participants with Eating Disorders (EDs) and Healthy Controls (HCs).
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pone.0133827.g002: Frequencies of positive and negative facial expressions shown by participants with Eating Disorders and Healthy Controls.Mean frequencies of positive facial expressions shown in response to happy displays and negative facial expressions shown in response to negative displays (i.e. sadness and anger) in participants with Eating Disorders (EDs) and Healthy Controls (HCs).

Mentions: Overall, participants with EDs displayed fewer emotional expressions than HCs (Group: F1, 107 = 18.2, p < .0001). In particular they showed significantly fewer positive expressions in response to the video clip displaying happiness (t111 = 3.5, p = .001) and fewer negative expressions in response to the video clips displaying anger (t110 = 2.4, p = .02) and sadness (t109 = 2.3, p = .02). Frequencies of facial expressions are shown in Fig 2.


Emotional Processing, Recognition, Empathy and Evoked Facial Expression in Eating Disorders: An Experimental Study to Map Deficits in Social Cognition.

Cardi V, Corfield F, Leppanen J, Rhind C, Deriziotis S, Hadjimichalis A, Hibbs R, Micali N, Treasure J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Frequencies of positive and negative facial expressions shown by participants with Eating Disorders and Healthy Controls.Mean frequencies of positive facial expressions shown in response to happy displays and negative facial expressions shown in response to negative displays (i.e. sadness and anger) in participants with Eating Disorders (EDs) and Healthy Controls (HCs).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4529105&req=5

pone.0133827.g002: Frequencies of positive and negative facial expressions shown by participants with Eating Disorders and Healthy Controls.Mean frequencies of positive facial expressions shown in response to happy displays and negative facial expressions shown in response to negative displays (i.e. sadness and anger) in participants with Eating Disorders (EDs) and Healthy Controls (HCs).
Mentions: Overall, participants with EDs displayed fewer emotional expressions than HCs (Group: F1, 107 = 18.2, p < .0001). In particular they showed significantly fewer positive expressions in response to the video clip displaying happiness (t111 = 3.5, p = .001) and fewer negative expressions in response to the video clips displaying anger (t110 = 2.4, p = .02) and sadness (t109 = 2.3, p = .02). Frequencies of facial expressions are shown in Fig 2.

Bottom Line: Participants with EDs did not display specific abnormalities in emotional processing, recognition and empathic response to others' basic discrete emotions.However, they had poorer facial expressivity and a tendency to turn away from emotional displays.Treatments focusing on the development of non-verbal emotional communication skills might be of benefit for patients with EDs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Eating Disorders, Psychological Medicine, King's College London, Institute of Psychiatry, London, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT

Background: Difficulties in social cognition have been identified in eating disorders (EDs), but the exact profile of these abnormalities is unclear. The aim of this study is to examine distinct processes of social-cognition in this patient group, including attentional processing and recognition, empathic reaction and evoked facial expression in response to discrete vignettes of others displaying positive (i.e. happiness) or negative (i.e. sadness and anger) emotions.

Method: One hundred and thirty-eight female participants were included in the study: 73 healthy controls (HCs) and 65 individuals with an ED (49 with Anorexia Nervosa and 16 with Bulimia Nervosa). Self-report and behavioural measures were used.

Results: Participants with EDs did not display specific abnormalities in emotional processing, recognition and empathic response to others' basic discrete emotions. However, they had poorer facial expressivity and a tendency to turn away from emotional displays.

Conclusion: Treatments focusing on the development of non-verbal emotional communication skills might be of benefit for patients with EDs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus